Polishing Epoxy Finish

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by JE, Dec 10, 2011.

  1. JE

    JE Active Member

    Just finished turning my first spey rod. I tried out my first feather inlay as well on this one right above the cork. Above the inlay are some simple decorative wraps and the script that includes maker and specs - no hook keeper. The finish extends about 10" from the cork. The finish ended up too uneven and thick as it took a couple extra layers of flex coat lite to cover the inlay. I sanded it down with 350 grit and then 400 wet dry sandpaper. I sanded it down to my liking and it actually looks pretty cool with a light matte look. I don't want to risk messing it up again with another layer of flex coat. That being said, I thought maybe I could polish it to a shine with some type of rubbing compound ensuring the current thin taper and lack of potential fuzz, dust air bubbles.... Anyone try this or have some input?
     
  2. Matthew LeBret

    Matthew LeBret Active Member

    I have had that same problem with uneven finish in the past. I have just sanded down what I needed *like you have already done* and mixed a batch of finish and coated the area as thin as I could get away with. You have the pain in the ass part done, this last coat is not to add volume it only has to be thick enough to cover a 400grit mark. If you are using Flex coat lite it is ideal for thin applications. I would think that finish would be to soft to buff or polish for it doesn't set like a enamel would. That is the only advice that I got for ya. If you happen to go with the polishing please keep an update and let me know how it turns out for I have never tried that on a rod finish.
     
  3. JE

    JE Active Member

    I'll goof around with it tonight and try to post up some before and after pics. Stay tuned.
     
  4. JE

    JE Active Member

    Went to McClendon's in Woodinville and talked to the guys in there. Love that place. They recommended a bottle of a product called Gel-Gloss. I buffed that stuff in with a handi wipe for about 10 minutes on one side and it is looking nice and glassy. Basically just squeezing a drip or two every couple of minutes and rubbing it in. Working up to a higher grit sandpaper to prep like an 1800 wet dry (with water) would certainly cut down on the polish time. Kind of excited - no air bubbles or poker uppers in the finish. Until looking over some threads in this forum I hadn't even thought of sanding. I'm going to go back over a few of my other unevenly finished rods and take care of them with this process as well.
    -JE
     
  5. Greg Holt

    Greg Holt Active Member

    JE,
    I've never been able to duplicate the high gloss of original epoxy, regardless of the product used in the repair or re-do. Fiberlass repair techs use Gel Gloss regularly, along with even finer polishing compounds such as "new car wax", even toothpaste! If you go that route, finish with a pure carnuba wax like classic car wax after a thorough alcohol cleaning, knowing two things: one, you'll have to re-apply the wax from time to time, and two, it won't be as durable as the epoxy. You mentioned Flex-coat, and I haven't used it, so if it's a one part no mix, it may recoat without roughing up the entire area. Epoxy sure won't, it accepts fresh re-coats, or well cured sanded-in-between ones. This from an old (60's) McLendon employee!
    Greg

    PS: I often wonder about the headlight lens restoring kits, as they have to leave a near perfect finish?