Pontoon boat anchor

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Greg Gilliland, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. ust crious what everyone uses for a float tube anchor and how heavy. I am looking at a # pound one that has the folding hooks or what ever you want to call them. Will that be enough to hold my toon on stil waters.


    Thanks Greg
     
  2. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

    I don't have a pontoon boat, but I've long used a small Achilles LT2 and now have a Watermaster. I use a 5# window weight for my anchor. It holds any place I think I have any business trying to anchor in moving water. For still water, the folding fluke one you mention should suffice.

    Sincerely,

    Salmo g.
     
  3. Jerry Metcalf

    Jerry Metcalf FishyJere

    For pontoon boats, I have found that a 10# pyramid will do the job in all but the most ferocious winds.
     
  4. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

    Greg, I'm confused by your post. The title mentions an anchor for a pontoon but your body text says float tube.

    A recent thread pretty much beat the sh!t out of the float tube anchor question. But anchors for pontoons on stillwater is another question. Here's why.

    The design of most pontoons sits you up high and out of the water with only your legs from below the knee in the water. This high position has several tradeoffs.

    Because so much less of you is in the water than in a float tube (and because you can actually pull your legs out altogether), pontoons offer much less water resistance making them easier to propel, with either fins or oars. But because of the very lack of underwater resistance, your body and the pontoons themselves can act like a sail, catching the wind and sending you scooting across the water much more readily than in a float tube.

    IMHO, because of their greater tendency to be affected by wind, they need a larger anchor than a float tube. I have two for my pontoon: a 13# and an 8# mushroom. I don't think the design matters as much as the weight.

    I've been on Lenice or Nunnally and had the wind actually pull my 13# anchor loose. Using the second 8# anchor holds the boat better in the wind while also maintaining it's orientation. The second anchor prevents the boat from pivoting on the single anchor line, a real advantage when fishing chironomids over picky fish, or for that matter, any pattern that you don't want to have suddenly zoom across or through the water when a gust comes up.

    K
     
  5. I was tired when I wrote that lasst night it is a pontoon boat. Thanks for pointing that out. I re read it even and still missed it last night.

    Thanks again

    Greg
     
  6. WoollyBlogger

    WoollyBlogger Rich McLaughlin

    I'm interested to know how you set the second anchor on your pontoon boat. I've used a single anchor on mine and experienced the pivot effect.

    Rich
     
  7. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

    Here's what works for me: I installed a 3" nylon rope cleat from a boating store onto the frame rails just behind each oar pivot. I carry the anchors inside each of the left and right side pockets. When I want to anchor up, I'll drop the heavier anchor off the right hand side and then kick a bit left before tying it off on the cleat. If necessary, I then reposition the boat using oars or fins and repeat the process using the left hand anchor.

    K
     
  8. WoollyBlogger

    WoollyBlogger Rich McLaughlin

    Thanks, Kent

    I've been using the anchor pully mount on the back frame for my anchor which appears to be flimsy at best. I'll be hitting up the boating supply store.

    Rich