Posting location specific reports on the interwebs: A collective discussion

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Evan Burck, Nov 29, 2010.

  1. That shit happens everywhere, not just Texas. Spend some time on some hillbilly waters and you'll see LOTS of that right here in good ole liberal Washington.
     
  2. Think I could make a bundle of money by designing some kevlar chest waders?
     
  3. ;) You may be onto something.
     
  4. based on the guns while fishing threads, and meth, i would say there is a market
     
  5. ...........perhaps design in a conceal carry compartment for your favorite hand gun. It will need to be dry and quickly accessible for those occasions when you are wading deep and assualted by meth crazed gear chuckers.
     
  6. No need, already exists...

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  7. I've been a member for 5 years and consider this one of the best sites for great information and passionate discussions! I don't post much and when I have, it hasn't been a fishing report. I have seen information on this site absolutely over populate one of my favorite North Idaho rivers. I can always tell one someone opened their pie hole about it because the numbers of people on the river are threefold! Plain and simple, go find the river fish it and keep the report in your head otherwise next time you might not be able to have the experience you shared with thousands of people. Go get the report from your local flyshop and spend some money while you are there. Mumbles, I hope they at least fed you beers when you were blindfolded!
     
  8. Exactly the point of my original post. I just think that far too many people underestimate what posting their report has the potential to do. If you do want to share the experience with us (which I think is a great part of the site), leave the location to our imaginations.
     
  9. Meth-heads do not fish, fly or gear, they wait for you to fish and steal your shit.
     
  10. Amongst the pissing matches, head butting and bitch slapping, Lugan's post has made the most sense here.

    Everyone has good opinions.
    Post what you want if that's what you want everyone here to read.

    If a particular spot on a river means that much to you, then just say "HOT DAMN i caught it on the Cowlitz with JimmyJoeyEarlyBird below Blue Creek this morning, aint it a beaut?!!" (with enthusiasm and joy)

    Hell, i'm cool with that.

    It's better than getting your panties all in a bunch...
    Unless that's what you're into..:clown:

    And Larry.... STFU! :clown:
     
  11. It was a joke son............................................
     
  12. We all feel disappointment when we get to our favorite pullout and see another rig there. Every avid fisherman has his "secret" spots. Every one of those "secrets" is known by several other fisherman. I believe in not sharing those spots with everyone who has an internet connection. That said, here is something to consider:

    The popularization of a place, in many ways, will help to preserve it. It is popularity (money) that keeps the fishing lobby in Olympia rolling. There would be NO special regs or attempts to preserve rivers and streams ANYWHERE if nobody used and/or cared about them.

    To reiterate I'm not advocating posting the location of your "spot". Just food for thought.

    Tony
     
  13. I'd like to offer a bit of different perspective on this thread, which I find to be a fascinating discussion. As someone entirely new to the art of fly fishing specifically river fishing, I'm still trying to figure all this out. Entering the sport as a "newbie" has been difficult if not down right frustrating as I've had a difficult time figuring out the whole "what line, fly, presentation" package that makes fly fishing so darn much fun. It's the sharing of information amongst fishing enthusiasts that helps keep people interested and in the sport. That being said I don't think its a smart thing to share the "honey hole" with everyone online. I've seen a great spot be over run and covered in trash on the banks by a bunch of red necked yahoos. So I like to protect my spots as best I can.

    So as a counter offering to the sharing of the sweet spots. It would be cool if we had maybe weekly or monthly get togethers where those who happen to be more experienced in the sport could impart their knowledge on us eager to learn and who want to help keep the sport alive. More and more we hear about how hunting/fishing is dying off as kids stay inside watching the box and not getting outside. Then when we do have kids getting outside its as if we are shutting them out because we don't want to impart knowledge on them because we are scared they might come back and fish the river? Seems like we are wanting to grow the sport but not ever see someone else on our rivers. So the answer really seems to be not that we share the secrets with the world but with one another in person.

    That being said is there some place everyone is meeting to do stuff like this already and I just wasn't privy to the info?
     
  14. Well, anyone that wants to haunt my fishing hole, is welcome to join me. Skunk taste just the same to two or more as it does to one. I catch a lot of skunk.

    But I sure enjoy being out there in the water.
     
  15. KP good thoughts and a valid question. Obviously a formalized version is not realistic but informally it's going on all around us. It just happens (or should happen) a little differently than experienced guys showing newer guys where the fish are. As it should go, methods of finding good water, not the good water itself, should be shared just like techniques, gear tips, etc. And I know first hand those methods are being shared freely and openly...look no further than this site. Problem is a sort of "gift horse" issue exists, whereby many would rather skip the education and work, and just have that water handed to them. What should happen is you learn to search it out yourself, do the work, find it, then share with trusted friends who have done the same and can share equally...it shoud go both ways. I only wish the web had been around years ago to tell me how to look for good water. Took a while to learn back then.
     
  16. In other words, "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime." Except please don't literally eat the fish and turn it into a fudge dragon unless it's an adipose-clipped hatchery fish, of course.
     
  17. 5 years ago, I was on the jury for a murder trial involving one methhead killing another methhead. Believe it or not, the victim was a fly fisherman.
     
  18. there's two kinds of fishing...before the internet and after.
     
  19. Kingpuck,

    I'm puzzled. It looks like you registered on this site 3 years ago. I don't know how often you check WFF, but in the last three years you should have learned what fly rods, reels, lines, flies, and techniques are most popular for fishing trout, steelhead, salmon, and a few other species in various parts of the state. Numerous general locations, including how to find the good water, have been posted innumerable times. About the only things that haven't been posted are things that need to be seen in person and detailed maps to water bodies with a red X spray painted on the rock to stand on. But if one paid attention to the information that is frequently presented here, you don't need that map anyway.

    A fair amount of mentoring and lots of networking among WFF members occurs. Look at it this way, how many times have you invited WFFers to join you on a fishing trip in the last 3 years? So yes, there is a place. This, WFF, is one of those places. And I don't know how you missed it, unless you weren't paying attention. You really do have to do your part; no one else can.

    Sg
     
  20. I know of no honey holes, secret spots and still post reports from my outings. There are times that fly swaps are face to face, fly tying can gather groups and most of the time members of this fine place need little arm twisting to gather for a beer. Set one up and post it and see who responds.
     

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