Prep for my first deer

Discussion in 'Cast & Blast' started by Matt Burke, Oct 2, 2011.

  1. Matt Burke Active Member

    Posts: 3,642
    Kenmore
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  2. andrew Active Member

    Posts: 1,110
    Bellingham, WA.
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    Same boat Matt! I had a hell of a time zeroing my 308...I was flintchier than all get out...which doesn't make sense cause a 12 ga. turkey load has WAY more kick than my 308, and I have no problem with those. Needless to say I borrowed a lead sled and got a 3/4" group at 100 yards.

    I'm both excited and reluctant for modern firearm opener...never shot anything bigger than a turkey! Thank God my BIL is coming out from Indiana (big game fanatic), hopefully I get the chance to use his knowledge.
  3. Gary Thompson dirty dog

    Posts: 3,891
    East Wenatchee, WA
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    Matt
    Just a heads up on your sight in bench.
    You would be looking at a fat ticket for loaded fire arm on/in a motor vehicle if an LEO came along.
    Beautiful stock the Mauser!!!
  4. bennysbuddy the sultan of swing

    Posts: 2,262
    m-ville
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    I would have a gunsmith look at that mauser befor I shot it much .I have had a number of custom bulit mauser rifles over the years and to convert them to a belted magnum cartridge the bolt face must be opened up to allow the use of the larger cartridge if this is not done right the rifle might not be safe. Also mauser are used because of the fact that they reliablily feed & extract ammo , yours sounds like it has issues
  5. Matt Burke Active Member

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    Kenmore
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  6. John Dude Learned skills from George Dickel

    Posts: 329
    Kirkland, WA
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    It's a complicated way of getting rid of flinch, but you could have your guns re-chambered for 280 Remington Ackley Improved. It sends out the same 7mm bullets at the same speeds, but uses 1/3 less powder, and 1/3 less kick. Shoots tighter groups, too.

    I'm been sold on the 280 Ack for years. It's my favorite cartridge for elk-sized game.
  7. Big E Moderator

    Posts: 1,431
    Coon Bay
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    I've hunted with a 7mm Mag for quite a few years and have shot several deer in SD and MT. The first few seasons I had some issues with meat damage as the 7mm Mag is such a sledgehammer for deer. The one thing that you want to be careful with is the grain and makeup of your ammo. I would highly recommend a 140 - 150 grain bullet that will hold together and not expand much...like an Nosler Accubond or Partition. Be careful with your shot placement and stay off the shoulder.

    As far as butchering...I've always did my own. If you are going to be hunting deer, elk, bear, etc every year consistently, you need to start buying the processing equipment and learn to do it yourself. The only foreseable problem that I had sometimes was that it wasn't cold enough to keep the deer hanging in the garage but then I would just rent some cold locker space. I also made the mistake once of shooting 6 deer on opening morning...I had to take a couple days off work to process it all.

    Good Luck.

    --E
  8. Upton O Blind hog fisherman

    Posts: 2,158
    out of state now
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    I started rifle shooting at the Yakima Sportsman's Club Junior rifle team a long time ago. A couple of military rifle courses, some informal instruction by an outfitter in Africa plus some searches on the 'net and I've come to these thoughts:

    Really tight groups are great and they help the mental part of the game; the rifleman knows his equipment is sound, his basic technique is good.

    Now here is the practical part: the military learned that shooting at "bullseye" style targets wasn't helpful in training people to shoot at people. They shifted to silhouettes of humans which apparently improved the responses of combat troops in firefights. Now soldiers and Marines train on 3-D targets in life like settings prior to deployment. (I'll cite very credible references if you're interested).

    What I'm getting at is what the outfitter got me started on: shooting at photographic targets of game in the manner I would be shooting when in the field. And I'll tell you, it is really different. Now I'm finding where my failings and successes are in the "breath, relax, aim, sight picture, squeeze" technique when shooting offhand, kneeling, etc with or without the shooting sticks at varying ranges. It just feels more "real" looking at an animal in the scope rather than a standard target. I also only allow myself to take no more than 6 seconds to get my shot off, further replicating true hunting. I also restrict myself to 6 rounds of large caliber ammo per day, switching to .22 caliber for more "BRASS" practice. This reduces my tendency to flinch.

    My hunting partner and I have been doing this for a few months now and we both agree it is much better prep. Interestingly, we are the only shooters we've seen at the range using this technique except for the "running deer" contests they were holding for a couple of months. It may be too late in the season but I think it is a good idea to get a couple of paper archery deer targets and give it a try. That is my 2 cents for what it's worth.

    Good luck with the hunt, enjoy the surroundings, stay downwind and shoot straight.
  9. Greg Armstrong Active Member

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    Pugetropolis
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    Six deer shot by you on opening morning?

    You must have more to say about this - care to elaborate?
  10. ribka Active Member

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    E WA
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    In some states in a few selected hunting area one is allowed more than one deer. Typically extra doe tags are issued. I have done this in WI, PA, NJ, MD, MI, VA. In Arkansa you can shoot one deer per day for over 2 months. Many people in that state live on venison.

    I hunted Wy last year. I shot one buck and purchased an additional 4 does tags. As soon as antelope were shot I skinned out , deboned and placed meat on ice in a cooler in the back of my truck. I took 4 does in 30 minutes. All meat was deboned and in a cooler in about 2 hours. Approximately 30 lbs of deboned meat per doe.

    So yes, it is possible to take more than one game animal in certain states
  11. Big E Moderator

    Posts: 1,431
    Coon Bay
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    Not really...it was in SD. As Ribka said, lots of excess doe tags. The area I was in was part of a depredation hunt which is one way the fish and game can get rid of excess deer that are destroying crops and such in particular areas. I think the limit that year was 20.

    I was hunting an area that was about 5 miles square with a river cutting through it. I set up shop on a large alfalfa field and had a herd of deer a visible at daybreak. At shooting time I took down the largest doe. The herd, partially startled by the gunshot, ran towards me and then settled down at which point I took out another doe and then another. I walked back to my truck to drive out in the field and recover the deer and shot another near the truck. I gutted it and loaded into the back of the truck and drove out to the others. While gutting those, I shot another. I then drove to another spot which was a hillside overlooking another field and shot another one.

    The year before was about the same deal. I got four deer that year. Didn't buy much beef during the time I lived in SD and got real good with my butchering skills.
  12. Greg Armstrong Active Member

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    Pugetropolis
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    Thanks for the reply Big E - great explanation, and it sounds as if you ate well.
    According to what you've made us all aware of along with the "Coyote/Deer" thread, it sounds as if South Dakota must have a deer/coyote "imbalance".
    May be a good idea for that state to set up a "yote hatchery" of sorts and plant them amongst the herds, to thin them down a little.
    Hatchery 'yotes could have clipped tails for hunter harvest without affecting the native gene pool. A coyote punch card would be a good idea, too.
    Shouldn't be a big problem I wouldn't think, as the Dakotas have been famous for years for their pheasants originally imported from China.
    note; I hope you find some humor in this, as that was my only intent.
  13. Alex MacDonald Dr. of Doomology

    Posts: 3,315
    Haus Alpenrosa, Lederhosenland
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    The reason why we don't notice flinch when shooting a shotgun is because we tend to yank the trigger as opposed to gently squeeze on a rifle. You should be putting the fleshy part of your index finger on the rifle trigger, and for those bench shots, it should surprise you when it goes off. Gary raises an interesting question; one that bears looking into. Personally, I doubt any leo's around here would have a problem with it, but next time I run into Bob Francis, I'll ask. I shoot that way frequently, with a heavy moving pad blanket set up on the hood of the truck.

    Good hunting, Matt, and if you're hunting 245, you might think about dropping the meat off at Dan's Market in Leavenworth; their butcher won't have any problems with it!
  14. Gary Thompson dirty dog

    Posts: 3,891
    East Wenatchee, WA
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    Alex
    I got a ticket up in Okanogan Co.
    My loaded rifle was leaning on the truck tire while I was having a cup of coffee in the cab.
    I told the LEO he was being pretty chicken shit after he gave me the ticket.
    The judge cut the fine in half, it still cost me $75.00
  15. ribka Active Member

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    E WA
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    That is a CS charge there Gary
  16. John Dude Learned skills from George Dickel

    Posts: 329
    Kirkland, WA
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    Actually in the photo the weapon is unloaded and the action is open. In Washington if there are rounds in the magazine its considered loaded even if the action is ;locked shut on empty chamber. My ticket was 450$, cut to 50$ with enough trips to the courthouse.
    However, you would get dinged for shooting across the roadway.
  17. Upton O Blind hog fisherman

    Posts: 2,158
    out of state now
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    Gary,

    A true CS charge, most likely a "westside users supplemental tax" I imagine.
  18. Alex MacDonald Dr. of Doomology

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    Haus Alpenrosa, Lederhosenland
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    the roadway has to be "maintained", and that one doesn't look like it. We hunt up here on Ski Hill all the time, for grouse, deer, bear, and coyotes. Of course, the fuzz can't drive up here anyway, since the road access gate's locked. Only the Forest Service has a key.