Puget Sound Fish Boat

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Michael Dunn, Sep 29, 2007.

  1. Wayne Jordan Active Member

    Posts: 1,061
    Ratings: +14 / 0
    I'd recommend getting an open bow boat if you intend to fly fish from it. Make the deck area as clean as possible because fly line has a bad habit of wrapping around anything and everything. Glass is pretty, but you'll cringe whenever you go over those unexpected boulders when chasing fish along the shoreline. I guided off the coast of Maine from a Lund Alaskan, and worked on a 100' boat in Key West before moving out to Seattle...

    My buddy who still guides in Maine has a Pacific Skiff. I had the chance to take it out when I went home this summer. This probably what I'll be buying when I move back to Maine in the next couple of years....
  2. Jeff Dodd Active Member

    Posts: 1,573
    Langley, WA
    Ratings: +355 / 0
    For 5K, my opinion is your best bet is a 15-16 aluminum skiff with open floor (no bench seats), a console and a 4-stroke outboard. Then ensure it has running lights, anchor with lots of rode, extinguisher, bilge pump, battery/alternator, VHF and sonar.

    These boats are light so you'll have to watch the wind and not run too far from shore, but they are tough and don't cost a lot to repower. They DO NOT ROT! Having a console makes the trip comfortable, but will cost less than a windshield and windows, etc.

    Put your money into the basic hull and a good motor. The older 2-stroke motors are the hole you throw money into the water :) and cheap for a reason. (Can you tell I'm not good at working on motors, esp. while drifting toward the main shipping chanel)

    I'm sure you are also keeping in mind weight for towing. Also storage. Don't buy a nice boat and then have the pretty cushions fade and rot in the rain. Aluminum is easy to maintain.

    My last boat was an old fiberglass boat, and while it always made the old guys long for days gone past, it just made me nervous the transome was going to fall off because a stringer was rotted somewhere I couldn't see :(
  3. gt Active Member

    Posts: 2,616
    sequim, WA
    Ratings: +6 / 0
    don't cheap out now, check out www.westportyachts.com, hire the crew and go fishin' :)


    (try the photo tour to blow yur mind.)
  4. hendersonbaylocal Member

    Posts: 966
    Seattle WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
  5. frankrutledge Guest

    Posts: 0
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I gotta say I love whalers and almost bought one this year. I don't know if anyone saw the 20' Boston whaler outrage with a 200 2 stroke for 8k. an unbelievable deal. granted you had to drive to Quilcence to see it and that was the reason it didn't sell in the first day, but a great boat. That said, one of the reasons I'm glad I didn't buy it is because it's exposed. The older whaler shown is small, exposed and comes with a 2 stroke, but you can't add a smaller 4 stroke kicker to it. older glass boats on a trailer, that are taken care of, won't have rot, they will most likely provide some protection from our common weather, and have the adequate gunwale and transom for down-riggers and kickers. Those are just the obvious things the others are the ability to cruise to your fishing spot with more comfort, have a place to have a porta potty (and don't laugh), and for me a place to be able to lock up those rods and reels are nice. Here is one of my qualifiers for getting a boat for fishing the sound, since I start pretty early, I want a place to close off and have an air-pot of coffee. Just one of my wishes.
    I think now is a great time to get a deal on a good used boat. Damn I wish I could buy a boat!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:beathead:
    F.
  6. Nutty Squirrel Says: Smoke Salmon not Crack

    Posts: 49
    Ballard, Wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I am seriously thinking of selling my 14' Livingston that has a oil injected 30 Yamaha 2 stroke and 2004 Yamaha 4hp 4 stroke + Shorelander trailer all in excellent condition soon. It's a very clean boat with low hours on the both engines (I will have to verify on the meter but it's under 100 on the 30hp. The kicker probably has less than 25). I have been religious about always flushing the engine throughly when I get home and washing whole boat and trailer down as well. Always coverd or garaged. The boat is very stable and seaworthy. Whaler's are great, have a great history, classic lines etc. but they are a wet ride since there is little freeboard if you are looking at a 13'-15'. If you are looking to spend 5k or less you are looking at a 13' or 15' that needs TLC. Good luck finding a Whaler in W. Washington for less than 4.5k with anything newer than a 15-20yr old Merc. A classic 17' will set you back 9-10K (used of course) & a 16' Dauntless is very nice but very pricy. A friend of mine has a new 15' Whaler and it's great but also 20K+. Duroboat's are good too and about 5K for a used boat.

    I feel my Livingston is a much dryer ride than a Whaler and more stable due to it's wide beam, freeboard and catermeran style. I use it to cross the sound to from Shilshole to Jeff Head W. Seattle to Dolphin Pt. and Tofino B.C and fishes two people very comfortably. Top speed is about 22 mph with downriggers/gear and two guys. For O.B. I would stick to a Yamaha or Honda but can't atest to newer Mercs. Johnson/Evinrude were great in their day but have heard they are not what they used to be. I have also heard that Honda parts are much more than Yamaha but I wouldn't know since the only thing I have had to change on my Yamaha is a fuel filter and sparkplugs. My asking price for Boat, Trailer both engines + anchor, bumpers, lines, fishfinder, and more would be $4700 or $3900 without the Yamaha 4hp 4 stroke. Everything is turnkey. Attached is a ok picture
  7. Benni Member

    Posts: 59
    seattle, WA
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    gotta give another thumbs up to whalers. grew up fishing on them, and recently bought a used 13 footer for the sound. it took some searching, and time but i found a newer one (2002 with 40horse merc) for under 8k, the size and the money were what i could afford. it does great around the sound, and being a whaler, i feel totally comfortable in medium swells that the sound has to offer. great open bow for casting, fishes two easily. of course i want a bigger boat, maybe some day. it would be nice to get out of the wind on occasion!! the design of the hull on whalers is made to shed water away from the boatm thus making a dry ride.
  8. Michael Dunn New Member

    Posts: 186
    Vashon, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Thanks for all the replies and advice fellas. This mightr be my last chance to get on line for a few days. Thanks for the boat pic. I may be interersted. Talk this weekend maybe. I am in the the UP in Michigan this week and not always able to get to a computer. Wish I was fishing but helping my wife get her Ma re-located. She lives all alone on Lake Superior and winter is coming!
  9. Denny Active Member

    Posts: 4,046
    Seattle, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +46 / 0
    13' Montauk?
  10. Denny Active Member

    Posts: 4,046
    Seattle, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +46 / 0
  11. D3Smartie Active Member

    Posts: 1,987
    WA
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    having fished a lot of days on the sound from both aluminum and glass boats, glass is the hands down winner if you want to be able to fish every day and not worry about your back. I fish out of a 17' grady which have been going for about 10-12.5k on craigslist. My friend just sold his lund and bought a 17' whaler. (an old outrage i think) And it was 11k.
    The aluminum boats are easy launch and beat around on the beach. they are not a comfortable ride in any sort of chop and basically can ruin a day of fishing if the wind comes up. There is an ease that comes with having an aluminum boat and it stays in your price range, but your days out on the water are limited by weather.
    If you want to fish year round in the sound from a smaller boat, i think you need a glass hull. if you want to fish just the nice days, then an aluminum boat will get the job done.
  12. Nutty Squirrel Says: Smoke Salmon not Crack

    Posts: 49
    Ballard, Wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    13' Whaler Montauk? Doesn't exist as a model as far as I know. The classic 17' Montauk is a classic though. I thought the budget was 5K or less and now people are recommending boats that cost anywhere from 9K for a 1980's 17' Montauk to a Pacific Skiff which are 15-30K. It's fun to dream though. Under 5K look for a 15' Arima, 14' Lund, 13' B. Whaler 14' Livingston, Duroboat & maybe a smokercraft Alaskan model. If you are set on a Whaler goto: http://continuouswave.com/whaler/reference/ or check out http://continuouswave.com/whaler/cetacea/ if you just want to drool over nice photos. This is the best site there is for used Whaler information. Good luck.
  13. gt Active Member

    Posts: 2,616
    sequim, WA
    Ratings: +6 / 0
    there are all sorts of plusses and minuses to whatever boat you look at. no matter, it will always come down to a compromise.

    when i was shopping my spec sheet for reelfast, i also looked at several high quality glass boats. you may be surprised to learn that at least 6 different mfgs use the same sort of foamed in, sealed construction that made whaler, at one time, a one and only stand apart from the rest of the boat building industry, not any more.

    while i found two glass boats that were close to meeting my spec list, neither one of them could match a single and important factor, weight. let me be more specific, reelfast is 31.5LOA, mounts twin yamaha 150s and can hold 135g of fuel. with 40g of fuel on board, 5 deep cycle batteries, both motors and ansillary gear, she weighted in at 5,100#. the closest glass boat in the same length, without motors, fuel batteries.......weighed in at 6,500#.

    what that translates to is speed, fuel economy and a better carry capacity. having run aluminum boats in moving water as well as blue water, i can testify that they take a beating without complaint. in fact, reelfast already has several 'battle' scares which would have not been a pretty thing had she been made from glass.

    however, aluminum in saltwater is going to require your attention. being a 'less noble' metal, you will need to be attending to cleaning her up with some religious zeal. watch the anodes carefully and if you are going to moor your boat, you had best invest in a bottom paint job, two parts - a barrier coat followed by the actual bottom paint.

    if you are shopping actively for a glass boat, check the current web sites to investigate just how they are laid up. you will be surprised to learn that boats mentioned in this thread are still using the old style wood stringers put in place with a chopper gun. the glass boats i had my choices down to were vacum bagged and were totally composite in their construction. a bit more $$ but zero worries regarding eventual water penetration and rot. that will be one of the things you will have a very hard time investigating in a used glass boat with wooden stringer system.

    but no matter what you do, its going to be a compromise so get used to living with the various shortcomings and just go fish!
  14. Michael Dunn New Member

    Posts: 186
    Vashon, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    What do you think of this for $2500?
    Actually belongs to a freind of mine that commuted from Bainbridge to the locks in it for a few years. Has a different motor on it nowI guess. He built the house.
    I'd need to get my own trailer.
    [IMG]
  15. Michael Dunn New Member

    Posts: 186
    Vashon, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Crap. Can't seem to attach the photo he sent me.
    The boat is a 19 Southern Skimmer that he built his own house on. It looks really well done. 90 Horse o.b. and not exactly what I was lookin for but could fit the bill.


  16. D3Smartie Active Member

    Posts: 1,987
    WA
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    what do you want to use this boat for?
  17. Michael Dunn New Member

    Posts: 186
    Vashon, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
  18. frankrutledge Guest

    Posts: 0
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    It looks fine, but I'm not sure (of course) how sea worthy it is. It's sort of a hybrid Whaler and fishing boat. What I see it doesn't have is a deep, or somewhat deep hull to combat ferry and other fishing vessel wakes. The fact that your standing in a shallow boat, but in a home made cock pit make me wonder if it's not a little dangerous. a sort of false sense of security. I'd try for something that was built to be what it was, by an engineer, taken care of, powered by motors that where taken care of, and a trailer too. I wouldn't settle for something that is home made.
    Good luck on your moving the in-laws.
    F.
  19. D3Smartie Active Member

    Posts: 1,987
    WA
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    havin seen Tom;s boat A LOT, i would say its a decent boat for the sound. Any rough weather and you arent going fishing though IMO. He has taken it across in some rough stuff though.
    The cabin is well built so i wouldnt worry about that part too much. A good fly fishing boat and one i wouldnt worry about beaching on a gravel beach.
  20. Michael Dunn New Member

    Posts: 186
    Vashon, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Fishing the sound. I live on Vashon and would be primarily fishing Dalco/Pont Defiance.