Puget Sound steelhead declared "threatened"

Discussion in 'Steelhead' started by Nick Andrews, May 7, 2007.

  1. FT

    FT Active Member

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    Salmo,

    I agree with you that the tribes netting some wild steelhead is not the proximate cause of the decline of wild steelhead numbers. I have no animosity toward the tribes for doing what they are legally allowed to do. I too would like to see the tribes stop netting in March/April for exactly the reason you stated.

    I was simply answering a question on whether tribes were netting during wild winter steelhead time.

    o mykiss, inland, jbuehler,

    I agree, greed breeds dishonesty and is a factor in the decline of the fish.
     
  2. gt

    gt Active Member

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    yes, the PSA newspaper was reporting the fish take in the puget sound area, not the west end. sorry to say that until the native americans play by the same rules we all have to live by, recovery of wild fishes will NEVER happen. banning the net fishery by all folks is a solution that has to happen. as long as the native american fox is in the wild fish hen house, nothing of substance is going to occur. spin your wheels as much as you want, rant on about nasty developers, but until the actual killing of ALL wild fishes stops, recovery will not be a possibility.

    all net fishing is indiscriminate killing via mono filament. who does the net set does not matter. ban the nets, level the playing field allowing native americans their boldt 50% via fishing means that provide some possibility of releasing endangered fishes of all species.
     
  3. Davy

    Davy Active Member

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    the best WDFW can do is put up Data from 2002?
     
  4. Coach Duff

    Coach Duff Banned or Parked

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    That was a great post Triggs. :beer2: As for the new guides, how about an actual examination complete with first aid, oarsmanship, survival and fishing laws and then deputize those that pass. Make it a major league felony with minimum jail time to threaten or attack one of our guide/riverkeepers so they don't have to carry weapons and can take care of their sports. They would obviously only report or check out obvious infractions. Checking everyone with a fishing license would kill their trips and be completely unrealistic. Every year they would have to take a continuing education class to renew their guide's license. This will never happen and a bunch of current guides will scream bloody murder, but it could be the start of something good. It wouldn't pay much, but would help with overhead and gas, and put some more profit in a good, hardworking guide's pocket. Just thinking out loud on how to get more enforcement on the rivers and clean up the business a bit. Coach :beer2:
     
  5. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    Interesting. Do they keep stats on marked versus unmarked fish? If they are ending in Feb, then is it at the 1st or the 28th? I figured they're doing their netting to make sure they get their allotment of hatchery bonkers, but then again, there are probably people who don't give a shit and to them a fish is a fish....

    As for the Skagit, I'm *very* surprised that the tribes are netting that late into the season. Is it more of a cerimonial/subsistance kind of netting, or is it for commercial enterprise?
     
  6. HauntedByWaters

    HauntedByWaters Active Member

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    This actually may be one of the most realistic and beneficial solutions to the problem. I know many recreational fishermen who have zero problems with "poach and release" or worse. I wish they would get caught so they would at least feel like they are breaking the law. In all my years of fishing I have been checked two times..............TWO FREAKING TIMES!!!! WTF!?!!?
     
  7. Derek Day

    Derek Day Rockyday

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    I wonder if guides would really have a big problem. It would be in their best interest to be able to cite people commiting infractions, and help to maintain the viability of area rivers. I think that you could start a voluntary program to begin with, and see how it goes. I think it’s a wonderful idea.
     
  8. East Fork

    East Fork Active Member

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    My reaction exactly. Those 2002 tags had to be turned in by 4-30-03. Taking 4 years to compile the data is pretty breathtaking.
     
  9. FT

    FT Active Member

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    James,

    These tribes typically don't stop fishing until the 28th of February, which means they are taking mostly hatchery fish; but there are some wild fish taken in the tribal fishery, although usually not a large number.

    The Skagit is fished by 3 tribes (only a very small number of fishermen in each tribe though) and they typically only have nets in the river 48 hours/week (usually Sunday at noon through Tuesday at noon). The Skagit tribal fishery is both commercial and ceremonial.

    The Tulalip Tribe fishes for both commercial and ceremonial uses. The Lummi Tribe also fishes for both commercial and ceremonial uses.

    I don't know if the other tribes on the other rivers are fishing for ceremonial, commercial, or a combination of both. I suspect they are using the fish they get for both commercial and ceremonial purposes.
     
  10. Wild Fish Conservancy

    Wild Fish Conservancy New Member

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    PRESS STATEMENT
    Wild Fish Conservancy
    PO Box 402; Duvall, WA 98019 · 425/788-1167 · Fax 425/788-9634 · info@wildfishconservancy.org

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 5-08-07

    WILD FISH CONSERVANCY SUPPORTS ESA LISTING
    FOR PUGET SOUND STEELHEAD

    A statement from WFC Executive Director Kurt Beardslee:
    “Wild Fish Conservancy welcomes the announcement by NOAA Fisheries that Puget Sound steelhead will be listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The loss and degradation of steelhead habitat and the adverse ecological and genetic impacts from steelhead hatchery programs have limited the viability of PS steelhead, and current protective measures by state and local agencies are not adequately mitigating those threats. Without federal protection, PS steelhead would be more likely to face extinction within the foreseeable future.

    “However, we do not support the decision to include several hatchery-steelhead populations in the listing. We are also concerned about NOAA’s decision not to list resident rainbow trout populations with PS steelhead. Available evidence suggests that at least some populations of resident rainbows contribute to the productivity of some steelhead populations, and could be essential for the recovery of PS steelhead. Failure to adequately protect resident rainbow populations in Puget Sound could jeopardize steelhead recovery.

    “While NOAA’s decision is in general appropriate and welcome, it is hardly good news. Taken with the previous listings of Puget Sound chinook salmon, Hood Canal summer chum salmon, native bull trout, and Southern Resident killer whales, it is further acknowledgement that the ecology of Puget Sound and its tributary streams is in serious peril. Like wild salmon and resident killer whales, steelhead are an ecological and cultural icon of the region, but over recent decades they have declined dramatically. Despite that dramatic decline, the responsible state agencies have consistently failed to take needed management actions to protect steelhead habitat and end the harmful hatchery practices that erode the fitness and productivity of wild steelhead.

    “NOAA’s Listing Decision for PS steelhead describes in frank detail instances of past and present management characterized by faulty assumptions, misjudgment, and inappropriate action. While steelhead and chinook have different life histories and only similar habitat needs, they share the same Puget Sound rivers and streams; they and their overlapping habitats are managed by the same agencies. Puget Sound chinook were listed as a threatened species in 1999, but nearly a decade later, chinook recovery in Puget Sound is still far from certain. Now Puget Sound steelhead are listed as threatened too. Clearly, a new approach is needed. More foot dragging, empty promises, and half measures will not recover Puget Sound steelhead.

    “Wild Fish Conservancy urges NOAA Fisheries to use all the discretion and authority granted it under the ESA to take the strong, decisive actions necessary to recover Puget Sound’s wild-fish ecosystems.”

    Wild Fish Conservancy is a nonprofit conservation-ecology organization dedicated to the recovery and conservation of the Northwest’s wild-fish ecosystems. Through science, education, and advocacy, WFC promotes technically and socially responsible habitat, fisheries, and hatchery management to better sustain the region’s wild-fish heritage.
    # # #
     
  11. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Your Preferred Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide

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    I support the idea of mandatory safety training and certification, periodic recertification, and some qualifications, testing etc for the guides. New York and Maine have such a system and have since the late 19th century. Roughly a five year cycle. This is especially important as far as water safety, rescue and first aid in remote areas. ( I Hold the N.O.L.S. Wilderness First responder certs.) Most guides would not want to be involved in law enforcement on the water, deputized etc. And I must say from my own experience that you wouldnt want most of them in that role either. It should be enough to be responsible citizens with the freedom to call in violations as witnessed. And quite a few already do.

    Some guides are very hard on our remaining wild steelhead. :rofl:
     
  12. brooky 1

    brooky 1 New Member

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    I am curiouse. I fish the winter run on the snoqualmie. I know that the hatchery run comes in before the nates do. Does my fishing effect the native run? You would think that removing hatchery fish would be better for the wild run. I would hate to see the winter hatchery fishing closed down. The summer run gets pretty hammered. Gear heads ball up at the base of the falls for summer steelhead. The fish have no where to go. I planned on going down and filming it wih the camera this year. Maybe it would turn some heads to see what actually transpires down there. They hammer the fish pretty bad. They just keep plucking away until they catch the one they want.
     

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