Question for the oldtimers

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by guest, Dec 12, 2001.

  1. guest Guest

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    This is a big one for THIS oldtimer - How do you tie your flies to the leader when you are missing most of your upper-front ivories.

    It seems you need three hands or two hands and a good set of teeth to make and tighten the knots on your leader. I cann't manage this procedure well as I do not have a third hand nor the teeth to grip the leader end. I've tried attaching a large pair of hemostats (surgical locking pliers), used to grip the leader end, to a loop on my vest to do the job the teeth should be doing and have had mixed results. I've contemplated making leaders at the vise and carrying them afield but wonder what type of connection would be right once in the water (a loop like the multiple head systems use?).

    Okay, I've let it hang out there for all to see; an email via this forum's links would protect your privacy should any wish to respond.

    Old man, challenged in the tooth department, who finally tied his shoes...:BIGSMILE
  2. Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

    Posts: 1,343
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
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    I have no problems tying the Trilene Knot. Twice through the eye, then finish with a clinch under both of the loops at the eye. Pull it tight and clip off the excess.

    My brother, 10 years my senior swears by a little clip that he holds his fly with. Its a little 3 inch tube that has a small spring loaded loop at one end. Put the fly under the loop and release the knob, and it holds the fly tight wile tying the knot.

    Rob :pROFESSOR
  3. guest Guest

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    My problem is that I have the shakes. And when I get hot or tired I shake worse. I've tried one of those fancy things for holding the fly but it still doesn't work. I have resulted in not going smaller that a size 16 as the eye is too small and it moves around too much. As for using the teeth, I don't think that I've ever used my teeth to tie a knot on a fly. Heck they are both false so the feelings are different. I've thought about charging admission when I tie on a fly. It's down right funny. In fact I even laugh at myself.:TONGUE
  4. o mykiss Active Member

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    Cantcatchem:

    Sounds like your difficulty is threading the leader/tippet into the hook eye. Have you thought about using a threader? A stand alone threader may not be all that helpful streamside, but there are fly boxes (I think the maker is CF, or something like that) that have a row of threaders. At home (sitting down, well rested) you load all the flies you think you might need on the threaders (poke tip of threader through hook eye, then slip the fly down the shaft so that it sits below the threader opening. Streamside, you open the box, slip your leader/tippet through the opening of the threader (which is a lot bigger than the eye of the hook), pull the fly up, a voila, you're threaded. I know Kaufmann's sells these kinds of fly boxes, as I bought one there for my dad earlier this year. Good luck.
  5. Bart New Member

    Posts: 332
    Kirkland, Washington.
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    Stumpfisher - maybe we could tag team the tying. I've got teeth but my Jimmy Dean fingers are less than nimble. 'Course we'd have to deal with anybody in sight looking at us out of the corner of their eyes for the rest of the day. :BIGSMILE. I remember seeing a needle threader in Mom's sewing kit and was thinking about going to a sewing shop to see if they were still around.

    BTW, is your loss of teeth related to tying your shoes. That's impressive - I can barely reach mine with my hands some days.

    Thanks for "hanging it out". You made a point that we all deal with "stuff" and that somebody else has also.

    "I don't need glasses, the rest of the world just needs to get in focus"

    Bart
  6. guest Guest

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    I don't know if another fly box is the answer. When I get real shaky. I usually find some place to sit down and put my hands on my legs to steady my hands,then I can find the eye. As I am somewhat big around the middle and my waders fit like a glove I find a log to sit on. If I sit on the ground I can't get back up as my waders are too tight. They don't stretch. Light weight waders have no give in them. If everything worked right I don't know if I would have any fun fishing. All my problems seem to make it a good day. Everybody needs a good laugh now and then. Jim S. :BIGSMILE
  7. shortline New Member

    Posts: 15
    Tacoma, WA, USA.
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    Bart-- you may be on to something with the needle threader. I've never used one to put line through the eye of a hook or fly but I use them all the time when I use my sewing machine. They are a triangle of very thin spring wire that compresses to go through the eye and then springs open on the other side providing a much larger opening to put thread through and drag back through the eye. They are readily available in the sewing notions section of any fabric store. They cost less than a buck for a package of 2 or 3.
  8. guest Guest

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    Rob,

    Checked out the trilene knot and find the same problem as when I tie the improved clinch, namely not enough hands/teeth.

    One hand holds the fly, one hand holds the leader taut while one hand pulls the leader end tight to finish the knot. I still come up with three hands:DUNNO

    Me thinks ya use what ya got... I'll just get better using the hemostats (foreceps) to substitute for the teeth/third hand and get on with it. My other idea of tying the flies to leaders at the bench and using loops to attach while streamside seems overly burdensome. Now in a perfect world, I would have a young groupie giving me a hand when not keeping me supplied with hot coffee:DEVIL

    Thanks, all

    Oftentimes, whimsical old man
  9. guest Guest

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    Hey old man. I went out and bought a book on fly fishing and it has a easy knot to tie in it. It only takes two hands. It is called a weavers knot. The book is called The Fish Bums guide to catching larger trout. By Mike Croft. The book doesn't look like much but has lots of info in it. I like to read so when I'm stuck at home I start to read. Jim S.:THUMBSUP