Question on switch rods

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by ArmandoG, May 30, 2012.

  1. ArmandoG

    ArmandoG Member

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    Hi
    Ive been wondering if I could take a switch rod with me to my trout fishing in stillwaters.
    Totally new to this concept, been single hand flyfishing and tying for almost 20 years now.

    My questions are, if I get a #4 switch rod as the lines to match it will be from 200 gr to 400 gr could I be casting flies like sex dungeons and any other big streamers? Or as any other #4 rod I'll have to fish small flies? I weant to keep the rod as light as I can, will be fishing from a float tube.
    Best lines to match this number of rod in still waters, plus heads to fish different depths.

    Is a switch rod a gooda idea for stillwater fishing?
    Best rods out there up to 400 dollars.

    Thanks for any advice you guys can give me.

    Armando
     
  2. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    I casted a really sweet n11'7" 2 wt. at the Sandy Clave. It was built by Gary Anderson. He had a 230 gr floater on it and it casted a mile so to speak. Something like that might fit the bill. The "Plain Janes" run in the neighborhood of $500. A little higher price but a really well built, nice rod. It may be more difficult from a tube but it catsed really nice single handed as well. The rod comes in either 2,3, or 4 wt. You might want to check it out.
     
  3. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    Gary builds incredible rods; have several. Not a 'clinker' in the lot. Thing I really line about his rods is if he says it's a '5,' or a '6,' or a three .. that's exactly what he means. No multi-line weights in his 'stuff.'
     
  4. yuhina

    yuhina Tropical member

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    I am not sure if it is easy to fish two handed rods from a float tube. If you want to do spey cast, it is better have a solid ground to cast from. 4 weight spey rod has a lot of capacity for throw big flies... but there are also a lot of different lines designed for different goals...big, small, float, sink etc... a good article written by Ed Ward about light trout spey fishing... link below. Mark

    http://2handedtrout.com/?p=1934
     
  5. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    I love switch rods in the right situation. Sitting on my butt in a float tube does not strike me as ideal. Tight or small rivers and at the beach a switch rod is the go to tool for the job.
     
  6. Jim Ficklin

    Jim Ficklin Genuine Montana Fossil

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    I tried it, Ed . . . didn't like it. Went back to 1 of my several 9.5 & 10-foot single-handers matched to the target & planned offerings.
     
  7. ArmandoG

    ArmandoG Member

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    Thanks a lot for your answers, was thinking more about overhead casts while on the float tube, but definetely having a good range of flies to cast with the rod.
    Ill be casting some switch rods before buying.

    Thanks again
     
  8. hydrological

    hydrological beads are NOT flies and snagging is just ghetto

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    i find a 425 skagit short with a heavy MOW tip pretty much the lightest line i can throw a bulky weighted fly like a sex dungeon or other massive streamers decently with. and thats on a 6wt tcx. if i want to throw it well, i'll use a 475 on my 7wt tcx, which is what i always use for the big junk. so relatively, a 4wt would be way too wimpy. but that is using sustained anchor spey casts. overhead might be doable, but i hate to be undergunned. a 4wt 2 hander is probably best suited for trouting with much smaller flies, swinging a soft hackle, or skating caddis. one advantage is being able to use lighter tippet. there might be some TRULY great spey casters able to do it, but must of those guys dont like to be undergunned either. why work harder than you have to?
     
  9. Rick Sharp

    Rick Sharp Member

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    I have a Meiser 10'6" 3/4 switch and I've switch (spey) cast it and cast it overhead from a boat, on the beach and out of a pontoon. It has a godshall 265gr line he made for this rod and with changing of tips it lays down dries or chunks weighted nymphs with not much fuss at all. I'd recommend giving Bob a call and get his thoughts or Gary Anderson as well, both experts in my opinion.
     
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  10. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    OH SOOOOO YES, YES, AND YES.

    I'm sure I'm repeating myself here but you have one of Steve's lines for a specific rod (I've got several) you're in casting Heaven. The Man is, as are Bob and Gary, Master's at/of their trade.


    You have a 2-hander that 'this thing just doesn't cast like I think it should?'

    Call Steve.

    You soon will.

    PERIOD.

    fae
     
  11. Rick Sharp

    Rick Sharp Member

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    I agree wholeheartedly Fred, I have two spey rods and a switch that Steve has made lines for and at a cost of much less than store bought lines especially when you factor in the sweet spot feel. All three rods cast so sweet, Steve is in my opinion the only way to go. He knows pretty much all rods not just Bob's and if your rod is in question send it him and he will test it and tell you exactly what line setup works best.
     
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  12. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    Can only think of one time where I could see (mentally) scratching his head. Off memory here, but it was a 'Say What/Say Who?' switch that the manufacture was a 5wt. HA! Total 'not even close.' Steve had the fellow do a 'common sense' test (rod at 11' would (my guess) fall under those general guide lines.

    Rod rated in at almost a 9wt! Now that's not a close 'miss,' we're talking about a total new Ball Park.
     
  13. Matthew Joyce

    Matthew Joyce Member

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    Skagit/ sustained anchor style casting maximize the size of fly you can throw with a given weight rod. I have a 5wt Deer Creek switch I use for bull trout commonly to 4lbs, often bigger. The Deer Creek bends right into the cork and the 5wt is a great match for these fish. I throw a 360gr skagit head/ up to 9' t-8 sink tip and cast weighted 3" rabbit/wool head sculpin easily. I'd think a 4" rabbit strip sculpin would be challenging though to give you an idea of the upper limit for 360gr skagit. I suspect you'd be able to throw any fly that would be appropriate for fish you feel 4wt is adequate for.

    TFO Deer Creek switch rods are very good for the money. The built is aesthetically pleasing and the components are good enough. The cork is only decent. The rod is light and casts nicely, that's where the R&D money went, the blank, which is a good thing. Was based off some of Bob Meisers blanks. Cast well and very, very nice feeling while playing a fish. I love feeling head shakes bending the blank underneath my hand.

    Wool and rabbit strip both absorb water make for hard-to-cast flies. Flies such as intruders are designed to cast small, and fish big.

    A stiffer leader (ie" 10lbs Maxima UG) will help in casting larger flies so that the last 10' of tip and fly don't merely collapse in a heap.

    I haven't personally used switches for stillwater, but its possible. I'm not convinced its the ideal tool, but they'll work in some situations.
     
  14. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    +1 to what Matt just posted.

    fae
     

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