Realistic Tailhook leech

Discussion in 'Patterns' started by Tracy Lauricella, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. I had some fun figuring out how to do this pattern for the fly swap, so I decided to write up a tutorial, as it's kind of an unusual method.

    Here's the finished fly. Click the picture to go to the tutorial.
    [​IMG]

    This is the first time I've written a tutorial, and I'm still a beginning tyer, so please feel free to offer any suggestions.
     
  2. Tracy, nice work, great tutorial and the hemostats clipped to the hook that you are clipping is great. I tend to hold mine inside a trash can benchside, but sometimes the clipped portion goes flying across the room anyway. Thanks for the pictorial step by step and great tip.
     
  3. Looks good. Don't think I would have gone with the snelled hook. The eye of the hook looks like it could get in the way of a good hookup.
     
  4. you might want to look into the barred marabou for wrapping the collar with
     
  5. I like it Tracy. Well done on the tutorial. One of the better ones I've seen in awhile.
     
  6. i can't wait to recieve mine in the swap!
     
  7. I would prefer to go with a straight-eye hook, I just don't have any good ones in that size/form factor. I'm going to take a look and see if I can find some this weekend.

    I don't know that it'll interfere- this is an egg hook, like you'd tie a glo-bug egg on, so having the eye hang down a bit shouldn't get in the way of a hookup. That said, it does look a bit funny, and might alter the motion of the fly a bit.
     
  8. I did a sample one with barred marabou at the collar, and didn't like the way it came out. I can post a picture if you like to see the difference.
     
  9. Thanks for the tutorial! I'm going to try making some up this weekend.
     
  10. That's a nice fly Tracy, very natural looking, should fool educated fish!
     
  11. I re-did these with a level eye hook and they look much better. I updated my tutorial with a few tips at the end about using the level eye hook, gluing the thread, and locking in the braided cord.
     

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