Reaming out cork handles

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by mike doughty, Oct 23, 2005.

  1. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    anybody got an easier way of doing this besides cranking on a rat file? It makes my sissy hands a little sore.
     
  2. Big Tuna

    Big Tuna Member

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    I'm not sure if it's easier, but Madison River Fishing Company sells a cork reamer. It's basically a dowel dipped in some adhesive with very coarse grit sand. I used one once and it was pretty slick. I'm sure you can find it online.
     
  3. islandfisherman

    islandfisherman islandfisherman

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    Mike,Look on E-Bay in the rod building section,also lot's of other "stuff"you might need..Alan
     
  4. Tony Mull

    Tony Mull Member

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    My least favorite part of rod building! Cork reamers work better than a rat tail. You can buy them at most rod building stores or catalogs or you can easily make your own. You need grit, dowel or more commonly pieces of old rod blanks and masking tape. Wrap the tape in a spiral with space in between. Now spread epoxy getting most of it on the exposed parts of the spiral. Now roll it in grit, then roll it on newspaper to embed the grit well in the epoxy. Now peel off the masking tape and let the thing dry. The ungritted parts of the spiral let the cork fragments escape and make reaming easier. Most of the reamers you can buy are just solid grit and are much harder to turn. Starting with small and working up to large is the easiest way to ream cork. You will still need a rat tail to finish up. If you have the nerve and are willing to ignore all good advice, you can try using a power source such as a variable speed drill. I must admit i've done it, but i've also ruined a piece or two of cork. definitely work from small to large doing this and if you go too fast the epoxy will melt from friction. Pain in the butt any way you go about it.
     
  5. FT

    FT Active Member

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    Mike,

    You can buy ready make cork reamers is several sizes just down the road from Burlington at Greg's in Lake Stevens or from Ron at All About the Fly in Monroe. I think the sell for about $8.00 each. You need at least two sizes for single-hand rods (small and medium) and if building 2-hand (spey) rods, you will need the large size too.
     
  6. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    Thanks for the inputs gentlemen
     
  7. Randy Diefert

    Randy Diefert aka: Longears

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    Mike , I just picked up one at Anglers Workshop in Woodland today.
    They have an online catalog I believe and a good printed version.I'll PM you the phone number if you can't locate them.
    Randy
     
  8. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    Thanks randy, i already have there web site on my computer, i will check it out.
     
  9. willieboat

    willieboat Member

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    Mike,
    I've used a drill with various sized bits.

    Don
     
  10. Craig M

    Craig M Almost Senior Member

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    Try a rat tail file in a drill motor.
     
  11. Wayne Kohan

    Wayne Kohan fish-ician

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    I have a set of reamers that I got with my rod building set. I think they are more difficult to use than a rat tail file. I broke one handle putting too much pressure on it to get the reamer through it. When I did my spey rod, I really had no choice but to use the reamer, but trying to ream out 11 or 12 inches of cork was a bugger and I had blisters on every finger. Also be careful because sometimes the grit material will stay in the cork and will scratch your blank as you slip it on.

    Wayne
     
  12. luckybalbowa

    luckybalbowa Member

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    i agree with craig m.... i have used the reamer with a drill a ton of times and it works great. It is a little scary the first time you use it, but just take it slow and stop and make sure you don't ream out too much cork
     
  13. mtlhead

    mtlhead Member

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    sounds as i'm a bit late on this, but what the heck...better late than not at all.


    After beating up my hands on the first dozen or so rods I built using the cork reamers everyone already mentioned, I got smart and did exactly what they tell you not to do; put the darn things in my drill press. use the slowest speed you can, they will take the material away REAL FAST! It takes me about 15 seconds now and I get perfict results every time.:cool:
     
  14. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    In general if the reamer is too hard to push through, you are using the wrong sized reamer! I've got 4 different reamer sizes and I start at the smallest and go up to the largest. The idea is to knock off cork slowly, and for the smaller grips this is a pretty fool proof way to go. Using it in a chuck is all fine, until you get off center and the hole is really large and nowhere you want it :) Now for the *really* the spey grips I will agree that the longer cork grips are a pain. We did a BC style mooching rod and cussed it till we were blue! A friend of mine and I spent like an hour reaming that thing, but we found a website that has a pretty cool solution! You can make a pretty cool stand up reamer!
    Take the butt section of and old 2 piece nk old blank, do the epoxy grit thing on it. Next take it and epoxy it *SECURELY* to a tapered metal dowel. Then put it in some form of fixed stand and ream away! Since it's an up and down motion, and the reamer is standing up on end, you can use 2 hands to get it done.

    Finally, if you are getting grit in the cork with the reamer, you can generally get that out by taking a couple of quick passes with a file to know it out, or hit it with a blast of air from the vaccuum cleaner
     

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