Reel seat came off!

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by Josh Smestad, Jan 12, 2008.

  1. My reel seat came apart on me yesterday. This is my cuttie rod, a st. Croix I've had for ever and there is no warranty on it. The reel seat slipped right off. underneath was what looked like cardboard wrapped around the but of the blank. I cleaned everything up, just wondering what would be the best way to put it back together.
    Heres what I have to work with.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. That should be an easy fix. I use U40 Rod Bond, which is a 2 part epoxy made for rodbuilding. It mixes into a paste, so that it stays put as you slip the piece on. It takes about 24 hours to cure, and the working time of it is very long, so you have a chance to make sure everything is lined up straight before it starts to set up. You can get the Rod Bond from any of the shops that sell rod building supplies.

    Wayne
     
  3. Look up how to attatch a reel seat to a blank when rod building to get some images and more thorough direction. But as Wayne says, it'lll be an easy fix.

    1) Wrap masking tape around the blank in two places. Keep checking the thickness of your tape wrap by sliding the reel seat on. You want the tape to be thick enough so the reel seat will sit on there firmly enough. But not too thick so its uber tight. This will help ensure that your reel seat stays on straight when the expoxy is setting.


    2) Once the tape is on mix up some epoxy and smear it all over the inside of your reel seat and all over the masking tape, blank etc.

    3) Throw the reel seat on, make sure its straight.

    4) Gob a little more epoxy intothe bottom of the reel seat and throw the base on.

    5) Clean up any rouge epoxy before it dries.

    6) Tape the base of the reel seat 'up' by running lengths of tape from your cork handle around the base of the seat up to the handle on the other side.

    7) Enjoy your favorite beverage.
     
  4. I'd add to that... Use the masking tape to keep things centered. For *structural support* please use fibreglass tape bonded with epoxy. This will ensure a nice tight glue bond across the board the entire structure. Also if RodBond isn't in the cards for you, any 1 hour cure epoxy will work. Lots of folks have had good luck with things like PC-7 epoxy.
     
  5. Remove as much of the old glue as possibe first. Sand it, or scrape it off. Not to counter what Sloan says one bit, I use 1/2" masking tape and leave equal spaces of tape, and no tape, the whole way under the seat. Maybe a little more than equal in the non taped areas. This is the support, and spaces for glue to run to and still keep in contact. Put the seat on dry, then mark with tape on the grip, and on the seat where it is straight so you can lign it up easier. Slowly spin on the seat as it goes on, so the glue will spread out a little better instead of just pushing it up to the grip...

    It's simple, don't worry a bit...
     
  6. Is that a Pro Graphite rod?
     
  7. Thanks guys, I'll give it a shot:beer2:
     
  8. ...can I ask an additional question? I too have this rod and reel seat (yes mine is a 6-7 pro graphite model), but still attatched to rod. The question is, I would like to have a fighting butt. Do I have to change the entire reel seat(if possible) ? Can I adapt a fighting butt to existing seat? Should I forget about it? Thanks.
     
  9. It is possible...

    If you can, pop off the butt cap and see if the blank goes all the way to the end, (and it probably is), that is your first quest. Once you get the cap off and decide, take the butt section of the rod to where your going to get the fighting butt to match the size of the interior diameter of the reel seat.

    You "could" use a dremel or something like that to drill out about 3/4" to make room for the fighting butt, then glue it all back into place.


    Just take your time and don't go nuts drilling it out like a crazed dentist. You don't want to crack the blank. Hollow the whole thing out to the depth that will accept the fighting butt.

    Sorry, I'm at work, and going way too fast typing this.

    Greg
     
  10. ....so would it be easier to heat the seat and replace, or cut the butt section back? (maybe I should start a new thread) :p
     
  11. Either way would be not that hard. I would first see if you can pop the butt cap off and take a look, then decide from there. You more than likely will have to cut the butt section back even if you do the whole reel seat.

    If you want a new seat because the old one is looking shabby, go for it. If you just want a fighting butt, I'd stick with using what is already on there.
     
  12. ...can I ask an additional question? I too have this rod and reel seat (yes mine is a 6-7 pro graphite model), but still attatched to rod. The question is, I would like to have a fighting butt. Do I have to change the entire reel seat(if possible) ? Can I adapt a fighting butt to existing seat? Should I forget about it? Thanks.

    Easier and more practical would be to pop off the butt cap and find a pliece of blank that will fit snugly inside the rod blank. Build a fighting but with 2-3 corks, sand down and then either permanently glue the blank piece into the existing rod or carry with to insert it when you need it. I have found that because it lengthens the rod section I have strung the fighting butt on a short piece of old fly line and attached it to my vest when I needed it. I now just build the fb directly on the rod when I'm building them.
     
  13. ...That sounds like a good idea...... Thanks
     
  14. I recommend using fiberglass tape. Much stronger and the epoxy will penetrate it for a better bond.

     
  15. This is definately the easiest way. To make it easier, you can even purchase pre-shaped fighting butts that would cut down the amount of work you'd need to do (shaping the cork).
     

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