Reverse/Backhanded Single Spey Question

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by James Waggoner, Feb 10, 2011.

  1. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

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    Dan, if you can get someone to video on the water, that helps tremendously. The first thing you'll notice, is you don't look as rediculous as you feel and then you'll see your mechanics from a better perspective, that way you can review streamside and make corrections accordingly.
     
  2. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

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    Bruce, another question pertaining to either hand Single Spey or Snake Roll: At what point am I fighting physics...at a full downstream dangle, the best I can do, consistently, is around a 1/4 or more downstream cast. Directly across at times works but I find it's easier to snake roll it out to change the angle, then fire it out with a single. Would I be correct in saying the answer lies in foot position and rotation? Or is the answer simply to combine a setup cast?

    By the way I know a double spey solves this delema...I just want to keep it touch and go, for the sake of practice and fundamentals.
     
  3. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    You're only fighting physics when you're asking the line to do something it doesn't want to do. If your back loop is right, you can do anything. Start thinking more about fishing, than casting. In other words, less about foot position, and more what position your body is facing for that one cast. Yes, if you are casting over and over in a practice session, you have to worry about tweaking your back and shoulder if your feet are downstream and your torso is facing across. But in fishing, not so much. Try less casting in your sessions, and more thinking, prior to your casts, just like you would analyze things when fishing. you know, "okay, I need a 70 foot cast, I have a tree behind me, I want to face my target..." for every cast, and change up your targets. Foot position is something you can't count on in fishing situations. Much like a hunter, if all you shoot from is a perfect level prone position on a pad, your first goat trip is going to be a rude awakening. Or your first time in the bow of a rocking boat with a wind in your face in the salt.

    But here's a dirty little secret. On a long cast. And we're talking long, you can accomplish the same swing, with much more control, at a very tight angle downstream that you can with a shorter more across cast. And if you need more sink, just pull back A LOT to make slack when it lands, and feed that back prior to the swing.
     
  4. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

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    Thanks Philster. All great points, but still learning and understanding the casting fundementals affords me the ability to adlib in the field.

    I know the dirty little secret and I use it a lot. What I really like about "the Dirty Little Secret" is how slow the fly swings, compared to a shorter steeper angle. Of course there are uses for both to meet conditions, therefore it's important to be able to employ both.

    I was actually thinking about summer, long leaders, full floaters...its the weather I guess.
     
  5. fisshman26

    fisshman26 Member

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    James a snake roll without the single would be the cast to do if you want to cast straight across the stream, you can do it with the single but takes alittle practice and patience. Think of the cast in parts, stand sqaure facing where you want the cast to go and the line dangling, turn the upper body to the dangle, lift the rod to clear the line, turn the upper body and once the turn is made flip the line into your d loop and fire out. Simple to say but deceptivlly dificult, the shorter scandi line will help. Nothing fishes slower btw, than a loooong line swinging at a steep angle.
    Hope this helps.
     
  6. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

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    Thanks Bruce. I now see where I was going wrong, I was trying to bring the line around as I was squaring, pulling the line into me as it passed or should I say tried to pass in front of me. So once I've completed my turn, then flip the line back; got it!

    Yeah, I know long and steep is the slowest but some times, in deep runs 6+ feet I like to pitch it straight accross and get a good sink before it swings. In one particular run I like to fish I'd say I get 50% of my takes before the swing or right when it starts to swing and rise. And whose to say that some of the other 50% aren't follows from the deeply drifted fly into the swing?
     

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