RF Evening Bugs?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Woollyworm, Aug 13, 2001.

  1. Woollyworm New Member

    Posts: 129
    Seattle, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Something was bringing the RF trout to the top the other evening. I managed to hook a couple of fish using a parachute Adams.

    However, I didn't officially ID the insect. Can anyone tell me which species of bugs the trout were likely sipping?

    PEDs? Callibaetis?
    (I couldn't figure it out from the RF hatch chart that I have. It lists callibaetis occurring in September....)

    Thanks for sharing wisdom.

    Tight lines!
  2. steve s Member

    Posts: 442
    Issaquah, Washington
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    well i was there just a week ago, and saw a callibaetis hatch, you can identify them by their size(about a 14) the grayish body color, and the most notable trait is the mottled wings. and the last couple of years i've noticed the callibaetis hatch can start in early august.
    hope this helps
    steve s
  3. Woollyworm New Member

    Posts: 129
    Seattle, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Thanks,

    Come to think of it...I'm pretty sure it was indeed the mottled-wing mayfly.

    Here's what threw me off: The hatch guide I was reading suggested Callibaetis emergence was a midday occurrence.

    In your experience on Rocky Ford, do these insects typically hatch towards dusk?

    Any tips for fishing this hatch?

    Cheers!
  4. Peterp New Member

    Posts: 30
    Hamilton, Montana, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Pete Pilkey
    Hi Wooley,
    Havent been up there in about 10 days, but let me relate what happened about 3 weeks ago.
    I was fishing up there about everyday through the first 2 weeks in July, and was sitting in a friends trailer parked in the south parking lot. I had just arrived, and he was tying flys. He said look on the screen next to you. There on the window of the trailer, was what I can only describe as an encyclopedia of Mayflys. There were Baetis, Mahogany, Cahills, Pmds, Peds, all sizes, and I was getting PMS just looking. We counted about 8 different types just on that window.
    Now this is about 2 in the afternoon, so I can only say that Rocky Ford just doesnt fit the hatch schedule profile as far as I am concerned. I have watched this occur before, and it was not an unusual situation.
    So when it comes time to match the hatch, lets say we want to fish a mayfly. First lets size it. 14, 16, 20?? Lets throw a 16 on there just to start. Thin mayfly body, with tails, and probably a neutral color like gray or tan. Hackle Optional, if you can get it to float. something like a parachute adams would probably be a good starter, then you could fine tune it in accordance with what the fish tell you. No response, change size, color or all of the above, but make sure that any fly that you have on is presented properly. Presentation is EVERYTHING.
    I have watched several varieties of mayflys coming out of the schuck within inches of each other. I have seen huge drakes flying by, or sitting on the water get blasted. Sometimes a really large dry will work like nothing else, especially in the wind.
    Its fun to tie exact hatch matching flys, but most of us just dont have a gun bearer to carry them all. Rocky Ford has lots of different mayflys, so I dont think that they would be too shocked by anything that you throw at them.
    Hey hope to see you up there sometime, but I'm taking off a few days til the moss, heat, and snakes subside. Also, not much of a grasshopper population this year.
    Peterp
  5. steve s Member

    Posts: 442
    Issaquah, Washington
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    [font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON Aug-14-01 AT 07:45 AM (PST)[/font][p]i think that the hatch can last throughout the day, when i was up there just a week and a half ago, i saw a few coming off in the midday, but right before dusk they really started to emerge. to fish it, i usually start out with a nymph down deep, and because the fish are so picky, i usually start out with a nymph a size or two smaller. if that doesn't bring anything to the net i'll try floating a nymph, and then on to an emerger and/or cripple. i rarely have luck with a traditional style dry, usually an emerger in the film or on top if they are rising. if i'm not getting any takes, i may end up going through almost my whole arsenal of flies before i find a pattern that they seem to want. another way is to just stick with one pattern and keep moving around until you find a fish that wants it. each fish may be keyed on a different stage of the hatch and therefor each fish may want not only a different pattern, but want it at a different depth than all the others. and then there are the ones who seem not even care what is hatching and just eat scuds all day. i've found that rocky ford can be just as technical or difficult as some of the more popular waters in the west. i had always heard that the henry's fork was the hardest place to hook a fish, but rocky ford can be just as difficult.
    good luck
    steve s
  6. Woollyworm New Member

    Posts: 129
    Seattle, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Thanks for the info.

    Yeah, you're right. RF is a bug factory, and you could probably go nuts trying to match hatches exactly all the time.

    I find that persistence is usually the key. I think the spring-creek trout reject offerings a lot due to "micro-drag" on the fly. When I find a steady riser, I keep drifting an imitation over him until I hit the magic cast, where drag is nil and I catch the trout's rising rhythym just right. Then they'll bite.

    Anyway, I'm taking a break from the desert heat for a few weeks too. Maybe I'll see you out there later on in September.


    Cheers!