Rickards

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Nick Clayton, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. tkww Member

    Posts: 469
    WA
    Ratings: +71 / 2
    Rickards....

    My conclusion was the same. There really wasn't anything that earth shattering in there. Nothing really stuck, or stuck out. I might go peruse it again with preparation for lakes on my mind. He did convince me to pick up an intermediate line, which I'm anxious to use more and get more familiar with.

    He is very oriented towards biggest fish, oriented towards shallower water, very much prefers attractors and suggestive pattens to strict imitators..... And he really needs a better editor. That book could have been 1/2 as long.

    All fishing comes down the same thing: where are the various food items located, which food item are they choosing at this time, and then fly/presentation to match. He concentrations more on things he says are going to catch bigger fish. Personally I'd rather start out with a broader view, and would happily trade some numbers for some size. Love catching big fish--who doesn't--but I don't feel compelled to narrow the scope quite as much as he seems to. But to each their own. It's not going to hurt anyone to read his book, but it's not some sort of crucial work on the subject.
  2. Nick Clayton Active Member

    Posts: 2,999
    Ratings: +1,307 / 4
    Rickards....


    PM, I definitely believe you were being sincere. I also believe you don't purposely try to come off as an arrogant one-upper either. I'm sure face-to-face you are a truly swell guy. I would suggest, however, before you go accusing people of being super sensitive, that you go back and read through some of the recent threads you have participated in, particularly the Chironomid thread. There seems to be a pattern that has developed of people getting mildly upset over your posts and being "super sensitive". Well maybe the problem is not with other's, but more so how you deliver your intended message. Point the finger at others if it helps you sleep at night, but I can count at least 3 other folks in the past couple months who reacted similarly to your posts.

    A DB is an unflattering term and I'll leave it at that. I will say that I didn't say you ARE a DB, rather that your posts make you come off as one at times. Take that for what you will.

    Like I said, I'm sure you're a great guy and I'm sure we could fish a lake together and get along splendidly..... But I would highly suggest you take a long hard look at some of your posts, other people's reactions to them, and possibly reevaulate your approach.
  3. Nick Clayton Active Member

    Posts: 2,999
    Ratings: +1,307 / 4
    Rickards....

    I cetainly don't think this book is an earth shattering revelation that will change the way I fish forever. Nor am I one to hang off any "celebrity's" dangly parts, but I would argue that if reading this book was what it took for you to start using an intermediate line in stillwaters then it was MORE than worth the cover price.

    Nick


  4. pond monkey Member

    Posts: 51
    Portland , Oregon area
    Ratings: +13 / 0
    Rickards....

    I am sorry that I have offended. I'd like to think that I could express my opinion and allow others to respond in kind without taking everything that I say so personally.
  5. speyfisher Active Member

    Posts: 1,067
    State of Jefferson U.S.A.
    Ratings: +139 / 3
    Rickards....

    The last time Denny did a presentation at our club, he was touting a new camo intermediate line with a five or six foot sink tip that Cortland had just introduced at his behest. Stripping the fly while using this line would cause it to rise, triggering a strike from the fish. This was over five years ago.

    We had long ago discovered that use of the intermediate line, combined with rod tip in the water, resulted in a much more direct contact with the fly, enabling detection of finer takes. There was a problem, however, of break offs due to violent takes. Our solution to that was a 10 inch section of Rio Shock Gum between the fly line and the leader.
  6. troutpocket Active Member

    Posts: 1,787
    Ellensburg, WA
    Ratings: +337 / 0
    Rickards....

    Bingo. And while that is a very concise summary of what it's all about, it's also deceptively difficult to put it all together and translate it into fish in the net. I would say that Rickards puts himself out there as a mentor and has been able to turn that into a career for himself. While not everyone needs or wants his help, he must be doing something right.
  7. tkww Member

    Posts: 469
    WA
    Ratings: +71 / 2
    Rickards....

    That may well be true. I haven't used it enough to develop that appreciation yet, but I look forward to it upping my success that much. :)
  8. Nick Clayton Active Member

    Posts: 2,999
    Ratings: +1,307 / 4
    Rickards....

    I'm confident you will be very pleases with the results. My intermediate is easily my most used and most versatile line. I have several but my favorite is the Rio Camolux. I also recently picked up a Rio hover line that sinks even slower and look forward to playing with it.
  9. speyfisher Active Member

    Posts: 1,067
    State of Jefferson U.S.A.
    Ratings: +139 / 3
    Rickards....

    We missed a lot of strikes before we all started using intermediate lines for still water. his was mostly due to the ripple effect always putting just enough slack in the line that soft takes went undetected.
  10. guitarfisher Jeff W.

    Posts: 129
    SLC, UT
    Ratings: +5 / 0
    Rickards....

    Nick, after witnessing your intermediate leech stripping class at Lone last weekend, I had to follow suit. I picked up a Camolux yesterday and looking forward to getting the new line coils stretched out of it somewhere this weekend. ;)
  11. Nick Clayton Active Member

    Posts: 2,999
    Ratings: +1,307 / 4
    Rickards....

    Good call Jeff! I think you will enjoy experimenting with it. It truly is very versatile. Hopefully you will feel a nice tug or two on that new rod as well. I'm hoping to make it out this weekend as well. Had a week full of doctors and tests and desperately am in need of some down time.
  12. Drifter Active Member

    Posts: 1,638
    Ratings: +649 / 2
    Rickards....

    Paul I love this statement! in about the mid 80's I made a rule for myself I would not fish lakes unless they had at least a chance at a 6 pound trout. same with rivers, they needed to have 20" trout in them or they weren't worth my time. there just became a time when small trout were no longer as challenge to catch, and handling small fish in small streams does not help them at all. If your not fishing waters with a 6 pound or above trout then you wont catch a 6 pound trout. now just getting back into fishing for trout mostly the last couple years its only lakes. and i think coldwater has the smallest trout I fish for but they are beautiful and wild and have heard of a 27 incher being caught so it's my favorite close to home lake but still have to travel 2 hours each way to fish it in one day - but oh so worth it.

    I used to fish for steel in the teeny nymph days, when teeny was the man and his lines actually got down to fish but I never tied a teeny nymph on my tippet. many people used his flies but I created my own that worked just as good if not better. proved it one day with him at my side! I tied a few of rickards flies but just kinda have always tried not to use other peoples patterns, and invent my own that might be close - like his still water nymph - to me is just a tied down caddis with a bushy tail. I can make my own without his formula's.

    I do want to read his book or books because chan's first book showed or taught me nothing, very basic. what I'm looking for is information like how a dragon fly nymph swims-damsel-callibeatis-and many other insects and how they move under the surface to imitate they're movements so I can better match they're swimming actions. does rickards books go over these types of movements? how long of strips-speed-up or down actions?

    From what I've heard I will read his books anyway - many people talk very highly of them and it's just more info to add to what I already know.

    I am by far a great fisherman or even compare to these fisherman in knowledge but I have always tried to be self taught and most of my best lessons were getting skunked during a major hatch. going back and figuring it out - is the best thing in fly fishing to me. AND YES i FAIL SOMETIMES! My friend and I fished a lake today and landed around 40 fish mostly stockers with two around 18" but we knew they stocked excess steelhead in the lake and wanted to see if we could get one with indi's and mini leaches, didn't happen but we tried! two years ago I learned about strike indi's and chiro's and went on a crave because it was new. now i find myself going back to my techniques also and carrying 3 to 4 rods with me one for each different technique. indicators has upped my game a bunch to say the least. just like spey rods has changed the way people fish for steel for the most part.

    MORE TOOLS IN THE SHED IS ALWAYS A GOOD THING!

    WOW that came out long-sorry!
  13. Nick Clayton Active Member

    Posts: 2,999
    Ratings: +1,307 / 4
    Rickards....

    Well said Mark! I completely agree. I don't take his book as the Gospel and try to emulate everything he does. Rather I just take what I find useful and what I didn't already know and add it to my own tool shed.
  14. pond monkey Member

    Posts: 51
    Portland , Oregon area
    Ratings: +13 / 0
    Rickards....

    \
    Mark,
    I am glad to hear that you got out today...I do a lot of pond fishing in the winter myself as it is a great escape. I have caught 27 recycled steelhead and about twenty brooders this winter plus a bunch of smaller 'bows ... I am glad to hear that there are stocked winter ponds in PDX area. We are planning a move to Portland this fall. Probably Lake Oswego area... any winter ponds down there?
    Thanks....Paul
  15. dbk Active Member

    Posts: 205
    Spokane, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +62 / 0
    Rickards....

    Having problems reading the last two pages of this thread... they will not load on the computer- just get a blank page with "500" in upper left hand corner.
  16. trout123z New Member

    Posts: 19
    wenatchee wa
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Rickards....

    The first time I met Denny was when he was the owner? bartender, repairman, fly fishing guide at Rocky Point Resort on Klamath Lake in Oregon seems like about 25 years ago. My brother and I stayed there for a week while fishing the lake and the Williamson River. Denny was good to us and made us maps of the lake and shared his techniques and strategies for the lake. He even rolled up on us in his boat now and again to check on our progress. The one thing I did learn from him was the importance of lake fishing with an intermediate line and bought my very first one from him on that trip. Denny at that time liked to pitch big meals to trout that moved from the safety of cool spring fed areas in the lake to forage in the shallows for dinner. It worked well, but my brother and I grew up fishing the rivers of Colorado and we enjoyed the river much more than the lake even though the fishing was a push. Shortly after that I think I boarded plans on various trips on two occasions and had the seat next to him, which was odd and very random, especially considering that I don’t get out much. He was always good to me and was knowledgeable, but also seemed to be a little slick and always selling. I attributed that slick salesman behavior to an occupational hazard of trying to make a living in the fishing industry. I have not read his book and just enjoy reading the water itself making my own assumptions and using my own flies. I am sure the book is good and am grateful for the diversity in the sport we all love otherwise we would all be standing on the same rock! Time to go fishing!
  17. Vladimir Steblina Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working

    Posts: 739
    Wenatchee, WA
    Ratings: +241 / 0
    Rickards....

    For some reason I cannot access page 2 or 3 of this thread.

    So maybe somebody has covered it.

    I like Rickard's books. My sense is that he tends to fish eutropic trout lakes. Which is really where you find the big fish.

    Back in my college days I did water sampling for several fisheries classes and had to write a paper on the results. What Ilearned that on many euthropic (sp?) lakes there was ZERO oxygen for extended periods in deep water.

    I wonder if Rickard's bias towards the type of lakes he fishes accounts for his statement??

    One of these days I will buy one of those fancy oxygen meters. But I sure do miss those days of titrating chemicals using my mouth for suction in a small, rocking boat.