Rigs for Coho in the Rivers

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Luv2Spey, Sep 28, 2002.

  1. Luv2Spey

    Luv2Spey Member

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    Location:
    Sammamish, WA, USA.
    I understand that Cohos are notoriously hard to hook once they hit freshwater and that they are even harder to catch on a fly. Nevertheless, if one were to target 'em, what fly setups have been successful for folks?

    Float vs Sink tip?

    Color, Size, pattern?

    Presentation - Deep, subsurface, or waked? Dead drift or swing?

    Water type - Slots? Tail-outs? Riffles? Frog-water? ???

    Cheers,

    Michael
     
  2. SpeyRodBeBop

    SpeyRodBeBop Member

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    Location:
    Mission, British Columbia.
    Here in the lower mainland of BC typicaly a 6/7wt Rod loaded with clear or camo intermediate tip line would be the norm.
    Fly patterns: The ones I use the most are green and black buggers, natural and green muddlers and Kevins Koho Killer all tied on size 8 2xlong hooks.
    They seldom take a swung fly, so mostly I fish em in frog water, usually close to the bottom. I vary the retrieve but rarely make it real fast or real slow. First and last light is best. Coho, around these parts at least, are way spookier than steelhead, so I usually fish 8lb tippet and sometimes go as low as 6lb.


    For when sleeping I dream of big fish and strong fights.

    Tacitus
     
  3. Luv2Spey

    Luv2Spey Member

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    Nice fish, wa_flyfisher. The water in which you are standing looks pretty froggy. Did you catch the fish in frog water? If not, can you tell me something about the water these pods tend to hold in?

    Cheers,

    Michael
     
  4. Randy Knapp

    Randy Knapp Active Member

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    I've caught a few with various flies including beadhead nymphs. The one consistant factor for me in the salt or freshwater is stripping the fly fast away from the fish.

    Randy
     
  5. wa_flyfisher

    wa_flyfisher New Member

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    Location:
    Port Orchard, WA.
    I am not certain what 'frog water' is but the location was on a river in a pool.
     
  6. wa_flyfisher

    wa_flyfisher New Member

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    Location:
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    First of all I would like to know of anyone else fishes the following technique for silvers in the river:

    In my opinion they are one of the easier fish to catch (if the conditions are right). The most successful method for me:

    Low light (doesn't matter what time of day).

    Water slightly off color or clear. Stream flows coming down and clearing after a rain seem to make them bite more aggressive. I swear by polarized glasses. Sometimes the take is only the fish "mouthing" the fly. If you see it happen then you catch the fish.

    Depth needs to be in front of the fish at whatever level it is in the river. I fish an 7 wt rod with and 8 wt floating line and adjust the leader size and weight accordingly.

    Fishing location in the river system depends on the size of river you are fishing. For a shorter stream where the fish will only run about the first 3-4 miles to spawn then the first mile to mile and half of stream the fish will be more aggressive. Plus, I think the chances of them "remembering" what they like to eat is greater. Above the first mile or so you can usually still pick one off in every hole. The lower stretches of river I have caught 15 of 20 fish in a pod with this technique.

    I like to approach from upstream or get above them and cast for a good swing into or in front a pod of them. Let it hang for for a few secs at the end of the swing and then strip like mad.

    Fly of choice (for both fresh and salt) is definately a clouser. I tie mine in sizes 4-8. An Orange Comet with bradied silver tinsel body is my next best choice.

    If the fish aren't seeing lots of pressure I assure you some good success with this method. Here's a grainy picture of my success. I'd like to hear how you do. :HAPPY
     

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