Roberts' Palmered Caddis SBS

Discussion in 'Fly Tying Step by Step' started by ScottP, May 8, 2014.

  1. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    Devised by Clarence Roberts for the golden drake and golden stonefly hatches. Tied here with the spent paired wings in the horizontal, I've seen them at the 3/4 position, too; sidearm is much easier on the rotator cuff (see Dan Quisenberry).


    hook - TMC 5212 #6
    thread/rib - UTC 70 hopper yellow
    tail - pheasant tail
    egg sac/body - Congo Hair yellow
    body hackle - brown (undersize by 2)
    wing - grizzly hackle tips (paired/spent)
    front hackle - brown

    mash barb, start thread at 2/3 mark, wrap back to point above barb

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    measure (hook length+) some pheasant tail fibers; tie in, smooth butts, return to 2/3 mark

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    tie in a hank of CH (original calls for wool yarn - sheep don't swim and the first thing Norwegian fishermen do if they fall overboard is peel off those heavy sweaters, hence the Congo Hair), wrap back to tail

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    create a loop over the pheasant, tie down, then wrap yarn body

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    tie in hackle, then move thread back to point above barb

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    wrap hackle to the back, capture tip with rib, then spiral rib forward through hackle; trim hackle tip

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    pair up 2 pairs of hackle tips (each pair should be convex-to-convex), measure (hook shank), tie in at 75% mark, trim butts; pull up and set with a few wraps in front

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    separate wing pairs with finger, secure with Figure-8 wraps

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    tie hackle in front of wings

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    wrap hackle, tie off, half hitch x 2, SHHAN

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    looks like a Fokker D7

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    Regards,
    Scott
     
  2. Rob Ast

    Rob Ast Active Member

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    With those paired wings looks more like a dragon fly. I did not realize caddis have four wings.
     
  3. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    Rob,

    Don't think they do. The "Michigan Caddis" was a reference to the Hexagenia mayfly (which, also only has 2 wings); think Mr. Roberts was just trying to create the illusion of fluttering wings? I just thought it was a cool looking fly.

    Regards,
    Scott
     
  4. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

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    Taxon could correct me if I am wrong, but I am pretty certain that all insects except for the order diptera (true flies) have 4 wings. In many cases the second set of wings are shrunken and/or vestigial, but they exist nonetheless. The second set of wings can be seen in this photo hexagenia_dun_300.jpeg
    Also here is a nice picture of all 4 caddis wings
    picture_2650_large.jpg
     
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  5. ScottP

    ScottP Active Member

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    Gary,

    Thanks for the cool pics and clarification. I love Troutnut.

    Regards,
    Scott
     
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