Rod for Alaska?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by flyfishnm, Jan 27, 2003.

  1. flyfishnm

    flyfishnm Member

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    What other rod do you think I should buy for my trip to alaska. I am already bringing a 5 weight sage, 4 weight St. Croix and I am thinking about getting a 7/8/9 weight for large trout/small salmon. What weight and brand do you think I should get? I am going to the Kenai Penninsula.

    Thanks,
    Ryan:D
     
  2. maluce

    maluce New Member

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    I would recommend a 7wt minimum. Brand is a personal choice though most guys I fish with swear by GLoomis or Sage. I think the 4wt or 5wt will be too light. Most of the bows are 14-18" or more and they fight hard. Then there are the hugh dollys. Oh and the salmon that you will hook on accident. Back to the bows, I've personal seen 27" plus trout caught. See the attached picture of my friend for an example. You lucky dog!!!!


    Mike
     
  3. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    I've been up that way for a week each June the past 4 years. I agree with the other post about needing a minimum 7wt . . .I use an 8wt for sockeye and they occasionally get the best of me. I'd imagine you'll want something pretty fast action for chucking sink-tips and heavily weighted nymph rigs. Haven't tried a fly rod for kings yet.

    There are some monster rainbows available even in the heavily fished sections of the Russian river. A buddy landed one in the 30" range while fishing for sockeye :eek , I told him to quit fishing right then and there. He may as well work on getting a family started and tell the grandkids his big fish story over and over.

    The 4 and 5wt would be perfect for grayling and lakes fishing.

    Have fun,
    Rod
     
  4. Crump

    Crump Member

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    I would say go with an 8wt an a reel with a good drag, those sockeyes run alot, and you will catch a bunch of them. Also the 8 will al least give you a chance at a king. The brand is up to you, for that fishing all you will need is something somewhat durable and something that can cast heavy sink tips.
    crump
     
  5. speyneznbhm

    speyneznbhm New Member

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    the wind will be a factor in the great north that and the size of the trout flies alaska trout flies are big. a 5# will be only big enough for grayling on dries If it were me and I've been there I would take the 5 and a rocket 7\8 for the rest of the trip depending on when you are going the trout your targeting will be in and behind the salmon your sure to hook as well.
     
  6. flyfishnm

    flyfishnm Member

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    Thanks for the info guys, I have narrowed down my choices to possibly a 7/8 weight: gl loomis, sage or ll bean. I might get a sage because of how my 5 weight sage held up against a King salmon. I was up in Montana and hooked a King on a woolly bugger by accident. It was 48 inches with a weight around 30 pounds. My sage held up really good, so I am partial to sage right now.
    Still debating however, cost is a major issue right now

    ~Ryan
     
  7. greyghost

    greyghost Member

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    Ryan,
    I agree with the others...out on the peninsula you will want at least an eight weight, especially if you will be fishing the Kenai river itself. It is a big, heavy river, and a bright sockeye will surely do some damage to a seven or smaller. Also, many of the rivers have runs of Kings that are big, really big. I personally used a 9 weight Sage when I was fishing for Kings up there, some guides would recommend a 10wt. If cost is an issue, the Sage DS2 is about $225, and I think it is the best rod you can get in that price range. However, having a great casting rod will be less important than making sure you have a good disc drag reel with plenty of backing. Good Luck
     
  8. Dutchman

    Dutchman Tom Van Gelder

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    I agree with most of the posts. I would bring an 8wt for most of the salmon,it may be a bit lite for kings but handle the rest fine. I have used a 6wt for pinks and sockeye but feel the 8wt will give more coverage. Overkill on the pinks, fine for silvers and a little lite on the kings.
    I have not fished on the Keni, but have had good luck on trips to Kodiak,Juneau and Ketchikan with a fly.

    Good luck and have fun.:beer1
     
  9. DW

    DW New Member

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    Ryan -

    If you need an 8wt, shoot me an email. I have a SAGE I'd be willing to get rid of at a reasonable price.

    - DW

    dwlandis@hotmail.com
     
  10. Big Ben

    Big Ben Guest

    Grayling are really fun on a 4wt, the 5wt would just be redundant and a Sage could end up "lost." A couple rules I live by when I'm in Alaska are: Never have more than you can carry at a dead run and always be prepared to sleep in your clothes. Bring an extra fly line too, Rangers will cut your $60 fly line if a bear is anywhere near you. If money is a concern you might look into the sage DSII, similar to a RPL. The St. Croix Avid is also a good choice around $200. Sockeyes will wear you out on a 7wt, regardless of reel, the wind can really push you around. Buy an 8wt (winter steelhead back home) or borrow a 9wt and you'll be in good shape. Some good cigars will keep the helicopters, oops mosquitoes, at bay also. I like the Orvis Rocky Mountain III for a reel.:thumb
     

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