Rod Repair Question

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by Big Tuna, Oct 30, 2005.

  1. Big Tuna Member

    Posts: 1,958
    Wenatchee, Washington
    Ratings: +39 / 0
    I have a 6 wght. rod that I really like, but it has a regular reel seat with a wood insert. Is it possible to replace that with a new reel seat that is saltwater safe and has a fighting butt? If so, any ideas where it I could get it done, or the cost? Thanks in advance.
  2. Tony Mull Member

    Posts: 832
    Lake Stevens, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Yes. Any rod repair shop can do it. You might even do it yourself. The epoxy under the reel seat is softened with heat and it will come off. Then its just a matter of sizing up the exposed butt and epoxying the new seat on. If you buy the seat from a shop they might even do it for free or at least pretty cheaply. So shop it around.
  3. Banzai FFing and VWs...Bugs & Bugs

    Posts: 786
    Bremerton, WA
    Ratings: +3 / 0
    I recently did that operation by heating a metal rod and inserting it in through the butt of the rod (after first heating/ removing the butt cap).Try to find one that closely matches the inside diameter of the blank it will hold heat longer and transfer it through the blank faster and to the glue more efficiently. Make sure it is long enough to hold with a pair of locking pliers like Vise-Grips or similar. I used a propane torch to heat the metal rod, but a heat gun(hair dryer on steroids)will also work as will a kitchen stove burner. DO be careful about the amount of heat you use the blank could be damaged. Several applications of milder heat to the butt will loosen the epoxy. If you insert the rod into the blank and see smoke , REMOVE IT IMMEDIATELY,and let it cool a bit. You will feel the heat penetrate to the outside of the seat. When it begins to feel very warm to the touch and you smell the epoxy strongly, begin to test the bond by gently twisting/ pulling on the butt. This relaxation of the glue bond does not happen all at once, IME, and you may need to wear heat resistant gloves. I was a weldor for 20 yrs so my sense of heat may differ from yours. My wife accuses me of having asbestos hands. If you have an old rod to practice on first it will help but with some care you can do it with no problems. Low and slow is best for the heat. Good luck.
  4. Big Tuna Member

    Posts: 1,958
    Wenatchee, Washington
    Ratings: +39 / 0
    Wow! That's good information. Unfortunately, it sounds like this operation is over my head:beathead: