"S" river report...

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by stewart dee, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. stewart dee Guest

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    Out early on the "S" River for a day of all out grabs, lots of Dollies in the three to four pound range. Today I was blessed with a fresh chrome bright Native Steelhead - Made the sweet sound of music on the clicker.
  2. Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

    Posts: 6,285
    Duvall, wa
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    wish I could've went with you! after this week, i'll be available once again. my summer has been stupid busy
  3. TomB Active Member

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    seattle,wa
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    Not to take anything away from your fish, which by the way is beautiful, but that is a native resident rainbow, not a steelhead. the river you were fishing has quite a few that size.
  4. Sean Beauchamp Teepee Creatchin'

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    Shoreline, WA, U.S.
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    what makes you say resi fish over anadromous summer steel Tom? i'm curious.
  5. stewart dee Guest

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    Please let me know your outlook for my reference in future ID.
  6. Big Tuna Member

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    Wenatchee, Washington
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    I'm always curious on these id's. Is it the spotting below the lateral line?
  7. TomB Active Member

    Posts: 1,620
    seattle,wa
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    The spotting below the lateral line is the first clue...the second is pink hue near the belly, and the pointy snout, finally, the belly has the slightly loose look of a kelt, not the firm look of a fish with enough fat reserves to fast for the next 9 months. the later factors are indicators of recent spawning by the fish this late spring/early summer. if you don't believe me, get a second opinion from smalma.
  8. Panhandle Active Member

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    Selkirk Mountains, Idaho Panhandle
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    Before I even read Tom's response, I was going to reply that-that fish is the most "rainbowy" looking steelhead I'd ever seen. Nice fish regardless.
  9. Panhandle Active Member

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    Selkirk Mountains, Idaho Panhandle
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    By the way, if that is a resident rainbow, its bohemith! Is that at all common in the 'S' rivers? Furthermore, how could a rainbow, over there (being so sterile), get that big without going to the salt? Could it be a mature rainbow that, let's say, spent many years in its natal river and didn't go to the salt for whatever reason, then, 6 years into adulthood it went to the ocean for a few months to a year and then returned. I'd love an explaination, being that my understanding is that those rivers don't have the genetic components to kick out resident trout that large. Thanks.
  10. Sean Beauchamp Teepee Creatchin'

    Posts: 2,068
    Shoreline, WA, U.S.
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    i was just talkin about this same thing with a buddy. i recently had a great day where i landed several 15-20" resident rainbows way up on one of the local drainages and we were both surprised about the number and size of the fish. there isn't too much for insect activity, everything is pretty sporadic but some do offer some sustainance. mayflies, caddis, october caddis, some summer stones, etc.

    but once a year (especially odd years) they do get a protein buffet when the salmon head up and spawn. last year was out of this world how much flesh and egg was available. the trout and bulls i saw during this period were grotesque. all the salmon/steelhead smolt, whitefish and a ton of sculpin.

    they dont necessarily need to head to the ocean so much as migrate to where the feeding is good. and with low numbers of fish per mile this all seems rather doable to me.

    those rainbows i got were predators, fought hard, jumped high. not your average BWO sipper.

    on the same note i caught a gorgeous resi rainbow 16-18" on the snoqualmie just above fall city 2 weeks ago. that froggy stretch is prime ambush feeding for smolt and sculpin (SRC's loved it) and i guarantee you that fish migrated down from somewhere to strap on the feed bag when it encountered my streamer.
  11. Panhandle Active Member

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    Selkirk Mountains, Idaho Panhandle
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    Good point. I didn't take into account the diet of eggs and flesh. A few dominant fish on their game could make a good living.
  12. doublespey Steelhead-a-holic

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    Bothell, WA
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    If i'm guessing correctly, this fork of a popular "S" river has had a long history of larger than average rainbows.

    Not many, but I've encountered a few as well. About 3 to 5lbs and shaped like footballs, they certainly make the clickers sing. Jump like crazy too.

    Funny thing - years ago I thought they were a lost strain of native summer-runs. A biologist informed me what they were.

    FWIW,

    Brian