"S" River Report

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Jon Brengan, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. sopflyfisher Active Member

    Posts: 487
    Where the fish are located
    Ratings: +250 / 0
    Both. poppers are more durable. make no mistake, these fish and all their anadromous relatives can be very aggressive at times and not so others. salmon can be enticed most of the time. however just swinging like one would for steelhead is very unproductive. you need to think outside the box. there is no book on salmon in rivers that i know of, and that's gray and great. discovery of a tactic that works and refining your fly design and lines to suit is fun and rewarding. often the outlandish works for salmon. big bright stuff twitched on the swing or stripped rediculously fast works at times. sometimes not. i would love a sub forum on salmon as coho are likely my favorite fish to target with flies. and yes the two hander is appropriate much of the time. i would love to compare notes with folks as i trend to develop my craft in a fly fisherless vacum. i learn lots from gear anglers.
  2. Skyler Evans Active Member

    Posts: 219
    Fort Lewis
    Ratings: +32 / 0
    I went out on friday and i caught 13 pinks on the nisqually and i was able to get out for about an hour today and caught 4. I will post up a fly when i get home from work. this has been the ticket. Lately i have been swinging my fly and allowing it to get into the pool at the end of my swing, let out about 10 feet of line and do the 6 inch pull with a little pause after a few strips, they will usually take it on the first strip after the pause.
  3. Checkthisout Member

    Posts: 59
    Redmond, Washington
    Ratings: +8 / 0
    Keep it simple. Just tie on a hoochie with some sinking line or a small weight in it and call it good.

    Cast slightly downstream then strip back with quick little motions and maybe some minor up and down with the rod so the hoochie will "jig" and get 1 fish per cast until tendonitis kicks in and you wish humpies never existed.
  4. ten80 Active Member

    Posts: 516
    Bothell, WA
    Ratings: +84 / 0
    Lol, are you serious? A fly is pretty simple, especially when it works. Besides, hoochies take a fair bit of weight to sink and aren't fun to cast.

    Not sure what sopflyfisher is complaining about given that the report is both too specific, not specific enough, and on the wrong forum, according to his first post.

    I like to read reports from rivers, this thread has some good info for my next pink river outing.
    Checkthisout likes this.
  5. Checkthisout Member

    Posts: 59
    Redmond, Washington
    Ratings: +8 / 0
    You don't need them to sink far, maybe 4 feet? Sometimes you just gotta cheat......
  6. sopflyfisher Active Member

    Posts: 487
    Where the fish are located
    Ratings: +250 / 0
  7. sopflyfisher Active Member

    Posts: 487
    Where the fish are located
    Ratings: +250 / 0
    not complaining
  8. ten80 Active Member

    Posts: 516
    Bothell, WA
    Ratings: +84 / 0

    Ok, no worries, then. I may have misunderstood the context of your post. Do tell more about your interesting take on coho in rivers as they are starting to show up in "S" rivers and they are also my favorite salmon to fish for.

    Checkthisout, I've found that marabout or Finn Racoon can make a similar profile to that of hoochies, but have even better movement and don't weigh as much, especially the racoon, which doesn't pick up water. Add a conehead for sink and tie on an octopus hook. I'm not one to shy away from throwing "gear" on my fly rod, but I think that hoochies aren't the best option.
  9. Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

    Posts: 852
    Des Moines
    Ratings: +588 / 0
    and its more fun to tie a fly anyways
  10. Checkthisout Member

    Posts: 59
    Redmond, Washington
    Ratings: +8 / 0
    Aint no one got time fo dat. Kids and work ya know.....
    Fishee likes this.
  11. Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

    Posts: 852
    Des Moines
    Ratings: +588 / 0
    I'll skip the sleep
    ten80 likes this.
  12. Jon Brengan flyfishing addict

    Posts: 395
    Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.
    Ratings: +6 / 0
  13. Jon Brengan flyfishing addict

    Posts: 395
    Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.
    Ratings: +6 / 0
    ok today - at Ben Howard launch on the Sky, I caught 20 on a green/white/blue clouser minnow. This fly seems to work when all others have failed.
    PT likes this.
  14. Jon Brengan flyfishing addict

    Posts: 395
    Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.
    Ratings: +6 / 0
  15. Jon Brengan flyfishing addict

    Posts: 395
    Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.
    Ratings: +6 / 0
    figures that someone would have to accuse me of "snagging" - isn't flossing just about the same. Only problem is that you have to cast a crossed current then wait for the line to tighten, but I'm swinging the fly and getting my fish on the swing....technically that's fishing. Just like fishing for Steelhead.
  16. Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

    Posts: 852
    Des Moines
    Ratings: +588 / 0
  17. Cascadian New Member

    Posts: 19
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    See any cohos today Jon Brengan?
  18. ten80 Active Member

    Posts: 516
    Bothell, WA
    Ratings: +84 / 0

    I disagree with Pat Lat. Sure, it's possible to floss all salmon, but conversely, it's possible to get salmon (both bright and dark fish) to eat flies. Pinks can be aggressive in rivers regardless of their color; I've had pinks with one eye molded shut bite jigs and spinners, that is they were hooked INSIDE the mouth with the hook going from the inside out. Flossed fish are generally hooked from the outside in. I've also had lots of coho and a few kings destroy stripped, twitched, and jigged flies. Just because flossing and snagging work doesn't mean that you can't get salmon to bite.

    If you are hump-hooking pinks because they are in a tight school then try a different presentation (lighter or heavier sink tip, dangling flies from upstream, indicators, etc) or move to a different section of the river where the fish are more spread out.
  19. Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

    Posts: 852
    Des Moines
    Ratings: +588 / 0
    Well I would think that there is no way to solve the debate fully, I know the other species get caught quite regularly using standard methods, especially when bright, but the last few pink runs Ive witnessed (since about 03 was my first) Ive always seen banks full of anglers fishing for them and the only ones consistantly hooking them are the ones flossing their way through the slots. It would be nice to find a pocket of activley biting humpies, Im sure there are plenty throughout the system and good for those who have. Im just not going to try to find them amongst all the non biters and zombies in the system. There are a lot better places to fish in September of all months, than the middle of Snagville, PNW.
    PS hook placement is not always consistent either. I just recently landed a pink from the salt that had my stinger punched through the outside of the lip, just as a flossed hook could miss the first spot and end up inside.
  20. ten80 Active Member

    Posts: 516
    Bothell, WA
    Ratings: +84 / 0
    I had many good days at a nice hole full of biting pinks on a river, where there were few other anglers and I didn't snag a single fish. Forget all the gear flossers, they have nothing to do with non-biting fish. I think you need to change your mindset and explore some new rivers.
    Gregg Lundgren likes this.