Salmon on a Fly

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Woollyworm, Sep 5, 2001.

  1. Woollyworm

    Woollyworm New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA, USA.
    Hey all,

    Thinking of storming a beach this weekend for salmon. I've never fly-fished for salmon and was wondering if anyone could share advice.

    Basically:

    What flies work?

    Should I use floating, intermediate or sink-tip lines?

    Which tides are best--incoming, outgoing--or both?

    Can I keep anything I catch or are there special regs I should keep in mind?


    Tight lines!
     
  2. steve

    steve New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    .
    I've been fishing for Pink Salmon in Bellingham bay for the past week, and any hot pink fly seems to work. I fish in the evening during the outgoing tide. I've been using an eight weight rod with a floating line, and 10' sink tip (Type II I think). From what I know you can keep 4 Pinks. i'm not sure about Silvers or Kings.
    -Steve
     
  3. Bart

    Bart New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kirkland, Washington.
    Wollyworm - Pink for pinks, but general all species seems to be sparsely tied herring patterns, clousers or any baitfish imitations. The folks at Avid Anglers in Lake Forest Park know the salt well and are very helpful. Main thing in the regs is single barbless hooks for salmon. The rest is in the saltwater section of the regs. I generally call a local ff shopto see if there are any current up dates to the regs. Sea Run Cutts are catch and release only.

    Floating or type II or III will cover most situations and my thoughts on tides is that the best is the one you find when you have time to go.

    Good luck and let us know what happens, Bart
     
  4. ray helaers

    ray helaers New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    1,088
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    .
    My experience is that almost any fly in any color works as long as it's a chartreuse and white clouser on a size 4 or 2 hook.

    Seriously, clousers can't be beat, but any smallish baitfish pattern should be effective, generally tied sparsely to imitate candle fish. You should carry some accurately imitative patterns, but start with chartreuse and white or pink and white, classic coho colors. As the month wears on, be sure to have some small attractors like a ferguson green and silver or a Johnson beach fly. From the beaches, an intermediate line will be the most effective. A lot of guys use the new clear lines.

    On a lot of beaches you don't need to be able to cast a mile, but of course the more line you can throw, the more water you can cover. If you can throw 40 or 50 feet, you should catch fish; if you can throw 70, you'll probably do better. Often, the fish will be just out of reach of even the best casters, and there you go.

    Start with a medium fast retrieve of foot-long pulls, but experiment a little if you're not getting hits, especially if you know fish are around (jumping, rolling, cracking bait, or everybody else hooking them).

    You can only keep coho with clipped adipose fins, I'm not sure how many, but likely not more than two (it could be one; better check). I don't know what the rules on pinks are, chinook either, but you're not likely to get one off the beach anyway.

    Different places fish better on different tides, but I think most beaches fish better towards the top of the flood. There are places that do fish well at low tide too though. Whatever, generally you want to fish the two hours on either side of the tide change. (Expect the action to slow a little during slack tide. Of course we all live for the exceptions.) Coho seem to like a big push of water, and cutts like it a little easier. Getting up at the crack of dawn won't hurt.

    Good luck.
     

Share This Page