Sea Run Cutthroat Hooks

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Jack Devlin, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. Jack Devlin Active Member

    Posts: 1,211
    Western Washington, Puget Sound area
    Ratings: +982 / 1
    Unless I've missed it, none of the major hook makers offer a BARBLESS tinned wire hook like a Gamakatsu SS15, my hook of choice. Sure, I mash down the barb but there is still a remaining "bump" and sometimes this makes removing the hook a little difficult. It makes a bigger hole and I'm sure does more damage than a barbless hook would. I now grind the bump away with a Dremel tool at the vise.
    WHAT HOOK DO YOU USE AND WHAT SIZE? As I mentioned, I like the Gamakatsu SS15 and, because I catch a lot of different sized fish, I have downsized to hook size #8 . Anything larger can really damage a small fish. I no longer use the Stainless Steel hooks.
    I enjoy fishing for Sea Run Cutthroat immensely. This year has been my best year. We need a barbless saltwater hook. What say you?
    Photos of pinched barb and ground point. (Gamakatsu SS15 #6 - I ran out of #8)
    Thanks,
    Jack

    Attached Files:

  2. Kcahill Active Member

    Posts: 894
    Renton, WA
    Ratings: +262 / 2
    I use SC15 for all my saltwater flys, mostly in size 6 or 8. I crimp the barb down. I have never had any difficulty removing the hook, most of the time it will fall right out when the fish is netted.
  3. Steve Saville Active Member

    Posts: 2,519
    Tacoma, WA
    Ratings: +343 / 1
    I use either an SC15 or an SS15 hook. I haven't noticed any difficulties but I always run my finger along the barb to make sure it's down and as smooth as possible.
  4. troutdopemagic Active Member

    Posts: 412
    Lake Stevens, Washington
    Ratings: +136 / 0
    SS15+Hemostats. No Problem for this hombre.
  5. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,527
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Ratings: +1,501 / 9
    SC15's or Glo Bug Hooks, mash the barb at the vise, generally there is no nub at all. If I'm tying a bunch of flies, I'll prep a bunch of hooks, then group materials, sort of assembly line style. I will take as much time on the hooks as needed, sometimes I'll even just mash down all the barbs for tying then pick up the actual tying part the next day.

    I like the glo bug hooks because they are very small, very short shanked and work for small flies and tube flies.
  6. ibn Moderator

    Posts: 1,885
    Federal Way
    Ratings: +10 / 0
    I use the SC15's for Puget Sound stuff, they're great hooks for small tube flies, the wide gap and thin wire is nice. Check out the gamakatsu SL12-S for bigger fish. I like the straight eye for fishing tubes, and the thicker wire gives them a lot more strength. I've caught from kings and coho out at neah bay, to sailfish and dorado on them.
  7. Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

    Posts: 3,861
    Pipers Creek
    Ratings: +1,262 / 1
    If you like to fish flies with a single stinger, Gamakatsu makes barbless Octopus hooks down to size 4.
    A size 4 Octopus is a pretty small hook compared to a size 4 J-shaped fly hook.
  8. Jack Devlin Active Member

    Posts: 1,211
    Western Washington, Puget Sound area
    Ratings: +982 / 1
    Thanks for all the comments so far. I hope there will be more. I am familiar with the barbless Gamakatsu Octopus hook. I've used them. But, I really would like to see a barbless version of SS15 and SC15. Even when the barb is mashed down, there is still a hump and the barb area is "taller" due in part due to the way that part of the hook is flattened and the barb cut in the manufacturing process. A nice, smooth, cylindrical point would, I believe, go a long way in minimizing damage. I fish a lot for Searuns. I just love the darn things and I want to minimize my impact as much as possible while still enjoying the catching. It is a wonderful fishery.
  9. colton rogers wishin' i was fishin'

    Posts: 874
    gig harbor, washington
    Ratings: +10 / 0
    diachi 2546 is the best SRC hook bar none. metal is soft enough that when you mash the barb there is no bump and if your really worried about that little bump... ide hate to see what happens when a fish looses a couple scales
    Beachmen likes this.
  10. jwg Active Member

    Posts: 551
    West Richland, WA
    Ratings: +110 / 0
    Interesting about the diachi 2546 being soft enough. Its listed as a stainless steel hook.

    all my stainless steel hooks are hard and brittle and the barbs are more likely to break off than press down.

    I like the SC15 for my tube flies, whether saltwater pink fishing or freshwater trout fishing with a tube fly.

    Jay
    Duane J likes this.
  11. Jack Devlin Active Member

    Posts: 1,211
    Western Washington, Puget Sound area
    Ratings: +982 / 1
    The 2546 is a nice hook but I stopped using it some time ago. The 2546 and the mustad 34007 were the hooks I used for stripers and bluefish on the east coast. I had a few occasions of breakage on fish with the 2546. They seemed to break rather easily. Perhaps a bad bunch and hopefully not a problem now. I have a few left but have tried to get away from the stainless steel.
    Jack
  12. Steve Saville Active Member

    Posts: 2,519
    Tacoma, WA
    Ratings: +343 / 1
    I tie almost all of my flies for Dorado on the 2546. I bent one on a sailfish but have never had one fail on a Dorado of any size. I use the 3/0 and 4/0 so they are pretty hefty; not much chance of breaking.
  13. Billy Vanosdol Fly Chuker

    Posts: 26
    Puyallup,Washington
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Heck Jack! I have seen you catch em with broken hooks on your popper." Quick Release"
    Show Off.
  14. Jack Devlin Active Member

    Posts: 1,211
    Western Washington, Puget Sound area
    Ratings: +982 / 1
    Hi Billy. Been trying to get back to my routine after Alaska. Broken hooks work fine. It's amazing how long they hold onto a fly sometimes.
    Jack
  15. Jack Devlin Active Member

    Posts: 1,211
    Western Washington, Puget Sound area
    Ratings: +982 / 1
    If anyone can explain how this bent hook I would appreciate it. I can only think that the fish really clamped down on it. An 18inch cutthroat did this. "Landed" the fish and had a heck of a time getting the hook out(Gamakatsu SS15 #10). Buried in lower jaw. It didn't break, just bent. Beautiful fish.

    DSC03999.jpeg DSC04000.jpeg DSC04001.jpeg
  16. Billy Vanosdol Fly Chuker

    Posts: 26
    Puyallup,Washington
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Sorry bad post.
  17. Kcahill Active Member

    Posts: 894
    Renton, WA
    Ratings: +262 / 2
    I cant explain how it happened but I will admit I had the same thing happen once on an SC15, also on a large SRC. My guess at the time was the ferocity of the take because he hit the thing like a freight train.
  18. Mike T Active Member

    Posts: 853
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Ratings: +55 / 1
    If I'm using the SS or SC-15's in size 6 or 8 I now file the barb off after having too many hooks break while mashing the barbs. Despite the added bother I do like these hooks for smaller tube flies, amphipods & euphasids. All my clousers are tied on 2546's. Do try the glo bug hooks for polychaete worms and stingers.
  19. James Harrington Member

    Posts: 188
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Ratings: +26 / 0
    Think Colton nailed it with the 2546 recommendation. #6 for sea run Clousers; #4 for resident coho clousers and baitfish patterns. Bigger sizes for migratory silvers and such.
  20. Anil Active Member

    Posts: 1,061
    Tacoma, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +210 / 6
    I agree with most of the posters thus far, in preferring the SS15 and SC15 over the 2546, Mustad 34007, or TMC 811S.
    These ‘stainless’ hooks us a softer steel, that is necessarily thicker (to prevent bending of the softer steel). Colton’s comment that they pinch nicely is accurate (again, they are softer) but I worry about two factors with these hooks for catch and release:
    1. Leaving one accidentally in a fish. Stainless hooks will take much longer to dissolve.
    2. Diameter is much greater and creates a larger more damaging hole in the mouth.
    Neither one of these may prove to be fatal, but it seems better to use the modern thinner/stronger high carbon ‘tinned’ hooks from Gamakatsu.
    With any hook, I know several of my customers who also use a Dremel tool to completely grind away the barb. A hand file and some patience (and a fair amount of dexterity) will work as well. I've spoken to several hook manufacturers and they all point out that many customers still want barbed hooks and that removing barbs is much easier than adding them.
    The best way I know of to not injure these fish, is too cast and fish poorly...