SFR: How many miles on your truck?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by JesseC, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. I'm just clicking over 170k on my 2000 xterra. Yeah, that's right it's not a truck damnit. But, I'm in the market for a long bed truck for purely utilitarian/fishing/light towing purposes. How many miles do you have on your rig? What's the total maintenance cost been? What's the secret to your long life?
     
  2. Just turned 200,000 on my 2000 Tacoma last week! Secrets, just take care of it and it takes care of you.. most of my maintenance has just been regular stuff over the years and it's been paid off for quite a while. Need new tires and will get them soon...
     
    JesseCFowl likes this.
  3. 2004 GMC 3/4 ton, 130,000. No problems.
    Secret of maintenance: Stay close to the gas pump
     
  4. Jesse, how is a body-on-frame X-Terra not a truck?

    Anyway, my 2013 Subaru Outback truck substitute has 4k miles. Fricking awesome vehicle. It's going to some lakes near Coulee City tonight.
     
  5. 1993 Ford Explorer 144,000. Like Willie Nelson says in a song "nothin' lasts forever, but old Fords and a natural stone"
     
  6. Long-life any more is being smart about the routine stuff. The owners manual is a guideline and works fine for some items but not for others.
     
  7. My 96 Chevy Blazer is just about at 200k, and doing just fine.

    My brother bought it a few years ago with 140k. I got it from him last year and have kept putting on the miles. All it has needed is routine maintenance. Oil changes, belts, brakes, the usual stuff.
     
  8. 2001 F150 SCrew Cab 4x4. A pickup not a truck. Rolled over 200K recently. Maintenance cost has not been too high for me on this truck. Last year I spent about $1,200 to have a local shop do the front brakes, lower control arm, and tune up. First time I've paid someone to do work that I was capable of. Still, I dropped it off in the morning and picked it up after work and it was done. 2 years ago I had to replace a couple injectors and that was about another $1,000. Other than that yearly maintenance has been about $100 every 3 months for oil changes, wipers, etc. That is a high guess to be sure I account for everything. Tires and shocks (I always replace both at the same time) ran me about $1,200 for all 4 the last time I put them on. That was for Toyo All Terrains and Gabrielle shocks (don't like the shocks). Fuel economy isn't great. I average between 15 - 17 mpg. This is higher than I've seen most other people claim. More typical for this truck is 13 - 15 mpg. I've added some after market components and drive pretty mellow. When I tow my travel trailer I average about 8 mpg and that sucks! Especially with a single 22 gallon tank. The truck is still in very good condition. The interior has been kept clean (I like a clean interior) and the drive train is in excellent condition. The rear leaf springs squeak and honk like a Canada Goose stuck in a barbed wire fence and that is driving me nuts. Have to take care of that this summer maybe. Engine runs strong and no oil drips. It does seem to burn a bit of oil when I haul my oversized travel trailer over the pass.

    I recently rented a brand spanking new F150 SCrew Cab 4x4 equipped with ECO Boost (whatever that is) while on a business trip for a week. Running it back and forth from Augusta, GA to Aiken, SC and back every day it averaged right about 16 mpg (it had a digital readout in the dash that kept track of your average mpg). So, it seems even the newer F150 with technology that is supposed to improve fuel economy isn't much different than the older one. From my limited experience anyway.
     
  9. Shoot, I have an 2006 F350 Crewcab that's averaging 15.2 running around town and 12 mph with an 11' camper and a 3500 lb boat.
     
  10. The newer F150 with EcoBoost engine seems vary significantly on fuel economy. Some are reporting 20 to 25mpg and others 15 to 20mpg. I think these have a transmission that "learns" as one drives, so resetting the computer from time to time might help.
     
  11. Right now 1,300. Just got rid of a 2002 Tundra with 214,000 and still running strong.
     
  12. 2000 Tundra, just turned 100K. Runs great.
     
  13. Our 1997 Jeep Wrangler is just about to reach160K and we've had only a couple minor things happen over the years that have needed repaired. So just mostly routine maintenance costs. We've probably spent much on tires as anything else with it. Our other car, that is also a fishing rig when I don't need to go bouncing down rough dirt roads, is our 2000 VW Golf and it's right at 170K. We've had more things go wrong with it than the Jeep but our Mechanic says we should easily be able to get at least 250K out of it before an engine rebuild might be necessary. We plan to run both into the ground but we've got money saved for two new ones whenever that day arrives.
     
  14. Last pickup was a 2001 Ford F150 4x4 Supercab. I put 218,000 miles on it and the engine ran as good when I traded it as the day I got it. Dropped a tranny out of it going down Shoemaker grade but, that was my fault. Regular maintenance, tune ups and oil changes most vehicles will last over 200,000 easy. Current vehicle is a 2007 F150 in the same config as the last one. It currently has 80,000 on it with no issues.
     
  15. I come from an aircraft maintenance background so my rigs get better than average attention. My 94 Ram (factory ordered) only has about 140,000 on it by now but has been mostly trouble free. In 19 years it has used a starter and a fuel pump. The original brakes went to 108,000 miles despite towing a 21' fifth wheel for the first 15 years. Good maintenance is really the only secret and that involves replacing things before they fail such as belts, hoses, plug wires (a biggie), flush the brake lines periodically, a steady diet of Mobil I on all my rigs since 1977 and routine flushing of the torque converter every 40,000 miles or so.

    The old dear still has zerk fittings so it gets regular lubes. I took it in for a laser alignment when it was about 15 years old and it only required minor adustment. The tech said all the ball joints and suspension components were still tight and nothing needed replacement.

    Keep it clean, maintain it at a level that you could get in it tomorrow and drive to Maine and back with nothing more than a fillup and tire pressure check and any modern rig will last an easy 200,000 + miles.

    Ive
     
    constructeur likes this.
  16. 2006 Dodge 2500, 5.9L CTD, 84K on it's way to 500K... or so many Cummins owners say. I had 170K on my Ford Ranger, 4.0L and have always subscribed to and followed the oil & filter changes as being a key to beating the odds on engine life.

    Jesse - you might want to check locals reg's on "big truck ownership" where you live... kinda like a Cube being parked on a Texas ranch ;)
     
  17. 1996 Cherokee with 278,000 miles. Bought for $4200 in 2002 with 120K on it. Maintenance? Yes. What? Plenty of stuff, but nothing drastic--just your $400 jobs once, maybe twice a year. It's an old truck with lots of miles so I don't have any maintenance-free fantasies. Certain "elective" things have stopped working which I have elected not to fix, like the radio lights (STOCK AM/FM Cassette baby) and shifter lights and the passenger side power window just cree-ee-ee-ee-eeps up and down, if you're lucky. No real complaints for a daily driver. Ol' Whitey mostly stays in the barn until weekend fishing/Home Depot trips or if we need a 2nd car for some errand nowadays. I've got a gas-sipper to commute in now.
     
  18. 645,000 on my 95 Toyota.. Rebuilt the bottom end .005" over at 194,000, and rebuilt the top end at 264,000 when the head started leaking.
     
    Patrick Gould, olypenjeeper and TD like this.
  19. 1994 Dodge Ram Cummins Diesel 3/4 Ton long-bed with 209,000 miles. It was our farm pickup and when we sold the farm we just kept it. Used it for everything from hauling hay to towing balers to camping trips with Boy Scouts. Two-wheel drive. Paid $16,000 for it when it had 30k on the odometer... at a small dealership in Kellog, Idaho.
     
  20. 179K on a 99 Explorer. Oil change every 3K and tranny service every 30K.
    Other maintenance items as needed. Still running strong except it is time for some new rubber.
    I've owned three of these all with over 150K, but this has been the best of the bunch as far as reliability.
    Went and looked at new 4Runners recently for some sticker shock therapy.
     

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