SHR: Load Your Gun and Do Good!

Discussion in 'Cast & Blast' started by ceviche, Feb 1, 2007.

  1. ceviche

    ceviche Active Member

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    I know most of you hunters know about the good you guys (as a political force) have done towards habitat preservation already, but you all need to listen to this audio clip from the Seattle Audubon Society's BirdNote series. It's on "Birders and Hunters" and was broadcasted on KPLU this morning at 8:59. Here's the link to the page with the audio clip. Enjoy!

    http://www.birdnote.org/birdnote.cfm?id=1016
     
  2. Itchy Dog

    Itchy Dog Some call me Kirk Werner

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    I kept expecting them to say something slanderous, but it was actually a pretty positive broadcast. They're acknowleding that hunters are more than just bloodthirsty savages toting guns and killing things. Almost seems like the beginnings of the end of bi-partisanship politics!
     
  3. ceviche

    ceviche Active Member

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    Totally! But ain't it true? Think of the African safari hunters and their habitat conservation. It sure was better for the animals before the British left. But the point is that any hunter with brains will optimize habitat to provide better hunting. Real hunting ain't "canned" hunting. Habitat is the difference. Both fly fishers and hunters understand this.

    I only wish the automobile industry would do the same thing about fuel efficiency and fuel supply--least they (and everyone else) go the way of dinosaurs.
     
  4. andrew

    andrew Active Member

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    Where was this broadcast 10 years ago! I would have these knock down drag out fights with a classmate of mine in college about how hunters are 'major players' in terms of conservation and habitat for wildlife. His argument was that I was a murderer, while I would acuse him of supporting illegal bird importation because he had this beautiful cockatoo that would take flight and leave had he not clipped its wing feathers (not to mention that those birds can live to 100 in the wild!).

    I believe I got the last laugh with my version of "God Father"...vacume packed a goose head from one of my hunting trips and placed it in his drafting table drawer....wAY in the back! :rofl:
     
  5. seanengman

    seanengman Trout have no politics

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    Andrew... you are a man of exquisit taste. Oohrah!
     
  6. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    Nice link!

    I suspect my experience in the "marsh" is much the same as most waterfowl hunters. I spend way more time watching wildlife than I do killing ducks. In fact if were not for the wildlife watching and dog work I would not be a waterfowl hunter.

    I'm no longer surprised that when hunting that when my path crosses a "birder" that they seem astounded that I can converse with them on any number of bird species and usually can direct them to additional "viewing" opportunities that will enhance their day in the field. The numbers of raptors that I see are just an example - In the past season I have enjoyed watching everything from snowy owls to barn owls to peregrines to bald eagles.

    It is too bad that we can "hook-up" more often with our natural allies on resource protection issues. We all would be much more effective and a larger political force. My time dedicated to DU is now approaching that time I directed towards salmonid recovery and management issues. There are significant cross-over interest between the birders, waterfowlers, and salmon habitat.

    Tight lines
    Curt