Simple Chum Dressing

Discussion in 'Patterns' started by miyawaki, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. miyawaki

    miyawaki Active Member

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    Tacoma Red likes this.
  2. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    Tie that in pink and you have a killer Pink Salmon fly.
     
  3. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Unfortunate name. Question: what is the point of the bead chain eyes tied in at the rear?
     
  4. miyawaki

    miyawaki Active Member

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    This is an excerpt of my opening statement at the beginning of this thread,
    ". . . . ties the Chum Turd, a variation of Brian O'Keefe's great bonefish fly, The Turd." Bonefish flies are almost always tied hook up, eyes forward at the bend. The name is not unfortunate as it has become one of the most famous bonefish flies invented. Steve is also correct. In chartreuse it is a great chum fly and in pink, it is an awesome pink salmon fly.

    Leland.
     
  5. cabezon

    cabezon Sculpin Enterprises

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    Many bonefish flies are shrimp imitations. Shrimp use their tailflip to escape backwards from potential threats. Thus, unlike a baitfish mimic, shrimp eyes are located near the bend of the hook.

    Steve
     
  6. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Okay, I was just wondering. The patterns I use with great success for chum in Oregon rivers are versions of a chartreuse Woolly Bugger. The chum fresh in from the ocean as you guys catch would be more apt to take something that looked like a shrimp. Now it makes sense. The name still sucks :)

    (I'm not exactly sure why there are so many pattens that are named "turd"... doesn't fit the image flyfishing attempts to project ... more or less :D )
     

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