"Skating A Fly"

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Bucktail, Oct 12, 2004.

  1. Bucktail

    Bucktail New Member

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    Will someone please explain to me what is meant by "skating a fly". Where would a person apply this type of technique and for what type of fish? Your enlightenment would be appreciated.

    Bucktail
     
  2. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    From what i have seen in my videos, skating a fly is dry fly fishing with drag, making sure that your dry fly creates a wake as it skates acrossed the surface. don't dead drift it, but lead it with a little tension on the line. Lanny Waller presents this pretty well in one of his steelhead videos.
     
  3. Matt Burke

    Matt Burke Active Member

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    I never have skated a fly until last week on the Methow river. There were these great pools or even near tail outs, where there was turbulence from boulders under the water, but not enough to disturb the glass like top water. I had been holding off on the skating thing because I don't know how to tie a riffle hitch. I did it with a clinch and it worked OK. I think with a riffle though, one could angle it better and get it to skate at more of an angle. As it was, I kind of played with it a bit and got it to make S curves with the wake. Rainbow were hitting it so I know those Steelhead must have been staring at it pretty good too, but they didn't show themselves. It really adds a whole new level to imitation in your swing. Very kewl stuff. A dry fly with life.
     
  4. BOBLAWLESS

    BOBLAWLESS New Member

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    About the Kewl

    Here are a few things to think about, Matt, my dearest and only friend:

    Just tie two half hitches behind the head of the fly; now the fly is being pulled from the side instead of the front and will move away from the line of pull, off to the side, and will create more disturbance of the surface.

    Mend your line upstream immediately when the fly touches the water. This will help hold the fly on the otherside of the river longer.

    While I like the fly on the surface, if it is an inch or two below it is still a dry fly in my book.

    Cast across and sligtly down unless you have reason to do otherwise.

    Keep the fly in the seam as long as you can.

    Never strike when you see an open mouth-always wait for the fish to turn--then sock him three times.

    Don't remove the fly when the swing is over--fish it directly below you and even retrieve it some before you start your backcast.

    When the water is low, find white water areas of turbulence and fish the fly through the bubbles.

    The best dry fly is the muddler minnow with a marabo tail so that you get some action from the snake- like movement of the tail.

    I believe steelhead see the fly as a mouse, rat, snake, animal of some sort and view it as a threat to spawning and will move to kill it.

    Anyway, don't be too smooth--jerk the fly around a lot.

    Always stay in good contact with the fly as a strike may come at anytime.

    Challenge yourself to get the fly in hard to reach places or to come in back of rocks just so--tons of fun here.

    Be sure you mention to others that you have been fishing dry flies, lift your nose a bit and play the role. Even ordinary flyboys will think you are are pretty hot stuff.

    You are at the top of sport fishing with a dry fly. Not only have you burdened your self with fly gear but you have taken on the most difficult of flies to fish properly. There is no up from here.

    Keep a pencil for autographs.

    Bob, the middle name is dry flies, Lawless :thumb:
     
  5. Bucktail

    Bucktail New Member

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    Thanks for the enlightment, guys - - I need to try this technique at my first opportunity. Sounds like it might be a lot of fun providing the fish are cooperative.

    Bucktail
     
  6. Nailknot

    Nailknot Active Member

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    Bob is right on.

    Key to skating is a v wake. Live it. Learn it. Love it. Put drag on the fly, work your line, present the fly. ID the lies. Start upstream of the prime zone, and move down. The fish see all. As the wake moves into the zone, aggression will take over (if the fish is a taker). Skating is a technique for taking fish, not for hard hat fish or winter fish, generally speaking. Find good water. let the fly hang. Keep it in the film where you can see it. Strip retrieve. Try a #6 muddler, grease the heck out of it, keep it floating, swing it... get a feel for the technique. Nothing better than the surface take. Good luck!
     
  7. coachdean

    coachdean Member

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    Try using a high-rod to hop the fly

    I just got back from fishing the Wallowa river last week with my dad. We primarily used orange stimulators to simulate the multitudes of October Caddis flies that were skittering about, and we had quite a bit of success fishing on the top

    If you've never seen these flies, they're about 2 inches long and flitter about quite erratically. They land on the water to deposit their eggs, but it is only a moment before they take off again to flitter to a different spot.

    We were having our best luck when we landed the fly briefly and then used a high-stick to lift (hop) it off the water and then let it drop. I would land the fly, hop it by lifting the rod, let it settle and drift a moment as I'm hand-retrieving some line, then lift it again.

    Your arm gets a bit tired by the end of the day from holding the rod high, but it worked well.

    BTW, I've also had luck just downstream swinging the stimulator on the yakima...not sure why it works differently there than the Wallowa (I've had my best luck on the yak by just causing a v-wake behind the fly), but you might want to experiment a bit with the presentation, wherever you go.
     
  8. BOBLAWLESS

    BOBLAWLESS New Member

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    Old nailknot

    Old Nailknot knows his stuff. Listen up!

    Bob, the just call me waky. iagree
     
  9. Jaybird28

    Jaybird28 Member

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    Dosewallips River

    Headed over to the canal this weekend. Anybody have any advise on fish in the river, be it--searun cut's, trout, metalheads????? I'm staying at the State Park so walking is my only option.

    Thanks in advance!!! :beer1:
     
  10. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    I tried skating flies but everytime I cast my fly out the skates made it sink. What am I doing wrong :confused:

    Jim
     
  11. Longs for Cutts

    Longs for Cutts Member

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    Keep the rod tip up, grease the bug (try this: dissolve a container of Mucilin in as little acetone is needed to dissolve it. Dip the fly. Or order a bottle of Magic Sauce from Parks' Fly Shop at 406-848-7314), and make sure to keep it under lots of tension. If you tye your own flies, put a "slope" on the bottom of your muddler heads so they like to ride head-up out of the water. If all else fails, add a bit of foam to head and tail of the fly.
     
  12. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Geez Bob, that was almost verbatim from McMillan's book. LOL.

    But was good info (you know Bob, you could've called it a Riffled Hitch lol). It's really an experience everyone has to have. Nothing like a big steelhead coming up after a dry. I still want to make that 20# club. I'm close, but not quite. I know your heart skips a beat when you get that rise. I normally will keep extra line out so I don't strike to fast. I tried the dip the rod, then set hook, technique. But I get that "knee jerk" response. LOL. So I leave a bit extra line. That makes me strip in, giving the fish an extra second to get a good grab before the line is tight and I can set the hook.
     
  13. BOBLAWLESS

    BOBLAWLESS New Member

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    Riffling hitch

    You know Jerry, there is very little that is genuinely new in this game of ours. I'm not familiar with McMillan's book (he probably stole his stuff from me lol), but what I know is from experience or some one told me or I read it somewhere or it came in a dream lol or I saw it on a toilet wall.

    I am an old fart and in mucking about for 67 years, I have picked up a few clues here and there.

    And yet, I really don't know anything about fishing and I am reminded about this everytime I go out. One time I didn't even have a leader and had left the ones I had at home. I had to humble myself and borrow one and I could hear my partner mumble,"Shit, he doesn't even have a leader. How did he expect to fish?"

    Bob, the There's a bunch of stuff I still don't know and hey, I'm a smart dude." :(
     
  14. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    LOL. Actually, alot of this was stuff he published almost 30 years ago in STS and old flyfishing mags. Was compiled in a book that came out back in 87'. Great book to read actually. All it is, is his articles combined (with little excerpts he added afterwards updating info). Pretty good read actually. Though I have a bunch of old STS's with him in it from the 70's. If you can find the McMillan book (not the intro he has in the Jock Scott book), I'd get it just to read it. They only did a limited print, so hard to find it. I won't lend it out. LOL. Did it once, and took FOREVER to get it back.

    Actually, the riffled hitch was something I had read from some old Atlantic Salmon fishing books. Tried it on a few of my dries and the success went well up.

    I learned alot from my Dad and Grandpa about fishing here. My Dad's your age. Funny how much stuff I hear as "new tricks" he had done in the 50's. LOL. Usually just refinements of old techniques.
     

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