Sound Silvers

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by blazedemon3, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. blazedemon3

    blazedemon3 New Member

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    This is a little early, but I want to know what flys are hot on the Sound for summer coho. Any help much apreciated!
     
  2. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

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    fresh salt or estuary fish?
    Any baitfish pattern thats flashy works for me.... silver thorn is probably the easiest to tie although i havent found one fly that out does the rest.
    In the estuaries, i like a chartruse(sp) spider size 4. :beer2:
     
  3. tomc

    tomc Member

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    As a few of you may know by my mistaking Mill creek (north of Seattle) for Mill creek in Mason County :confused: I fish the later. There are lots of silvers and decent sized cutts for those with oars. There is a public launch at Arcadia Point and if you time the tide right (about 2 hours before high tide), you can work your way into Hamersley Inlet and have a ball with nice variety of fish and nice scenery. I live near Libby Point and plan my fishing for the out-going tide. If you just drag a fly you will know if your getting followers by the "orca snacks" (seals) keeping pace with you. I tend to work the back eddies and "structure" near the shore. If your in the neighborhood, let me know. I'm always up for a row.
     
  4. hikepat

    hikepat Patrick

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    Baitfish in the summer and early fall and clam worms {think wolley Buggers} and shrimp patterns in the spring seems to be the ticket for me.
     
  5. gigharborflyfisher

    gigharborflyfisher Native Trout Hunter

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    I do pretty good on small pink and white clousers.
     
  6. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Seems like an eternity since I've been out there fishing (normally do it while on the job during my lunch breaks). I always had good luck with baitfish patterns. Nothing special really, just lots of flash. I also tied small shrimp patterns in light pink or chartreuse. Just used simple and easy patterns. I was always a bank maggot doing it though. UPS wouldn't say much about my flyrod coming with, but think if I tossed a small dinghy/pontoon in the truck they'd be a bit ticked. :D
     
  7. Anil

    Anil Active Member

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    A rule of thumb that I always follow is to decrease the size of offering, the closer the Coho get to their spawning stream. I live in the Tacoma area, so following a fish from the Ocean in, this is my interpretation of their feeding behavior.
    1.Neah Bay/Washington Coast = Aggressive actively feeding fish. I’ll usually fish large flashy patterns that either imitate Herring, Anchovies or Candlefish.
    2. Inner straits and Northern Sound = Traveling fish. These fish are often moving toward their spawning river while they feed. They tend to prefer smaller offerings and are less aggressive than open water fish.
    3. South Sound: Traveling and staging fish. Some of these fish freshly arriving fish continue to feed, while others are staging and are often referred to as ‘waiting period’ fish. Small baitfish patterns as well as soft hackle patterns are suitable, based on time of year, apparent sexual maturity of fish and proximity to home rivers.
    These are general guidelines. They are my observations and there are definite exceptions to these generalizations. I have fished tiny patterns on clear lines to selective fish in the Straits. I have also seen Coho aggressively feeding very near their spawning stream.
    One other note, on presentation: My experience has been that the established wisdom, which holds that you should slow down your retrieve, the closer that fish get to moving into rivers is usually true. Depending on where you live, pink and white would be a great option, with both Silvers and Humpies returning in the late summer this year.
    Anil
    www.pugetsoundflyco.com
     
  8. NW Fly Guy

    NW Fly Guy New Member

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    I grew up motor mooching in the south sound. Mostly around Dalco and Pt Defiance. Most of the flies I tie are bigger in that area. Usually in the 3-4" range. Mostly because the bait of choice was an uncut herring on a mooching rig. Caught a lot of silvers on full herring. Those bigger flies have caught alot of fish. Right at the mouth of the Puyallup and out around Steilacoom as well fishing around devils head and a few other places out near the islands there. Have had alot of success fishing shrimp patterns for SRC's though. Seem to catch more of those then silvers with the smaller patterns. Bigger shrimp and baitfish always get me into silvers.
     
  9. dmoocher

    dmoocher Member

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    I don't hear anyone talk about eddys beneath the bridge for coho. I grew up motor mooching the same areas as NW Fly Guy...we've probably bumped boats at the claybanks a time or two. As a kid, mom would drop us off at Owens beach and we'd walk to the lighthouse and hammer the coho on triple teasers...we'd also walk down from my friends house who lived right by the power lines at the top of the hill (before they built all the way to the water). We'd climb down the hill and fish off the railroad tracks casting into the swirling water under the bridge...using the same silver/pink head triple teaser. 10 - 12 fish each was a good afternoon...bonked, gutted and into the gunny sack for the trek up the hill (I wouldn't confess this if the statute of limitations hadn't expired).

    It's almost impossible to hold a boat there, even on slack tide, but it sure held fish...I never see boats over there...everyone seems to fish the Gig Harbor side...does anyone fish it?
     
  10. willieboat

    willieboat Member

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    I think that sometimes we make it more complicated than it need be when fishing in the salt. I have found most of the silvers in the salt to be trollers. By this I mean that they usually try to eat what they see.
    Pick a fly that you have some confidence in, and when you see the schools of feeding salmon, try and cast it ahead of where you expect them to be, so that you don't spook them, and when you feel that they are near your fly, strip, strip, strip.

    Don
     
  11. ssickle1

    ssickle1 Slow and Low

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    Are you rowing your boat in the sound?? No motor, ect?