Spey Rod info.

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Big Tuna, Feb 23, 2005.

  1. Big Tuna

    Big Tuna Member

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    I have a Sage GFL9140-4 spey rod that I bought for cheap from my brother. Can anyone tell me what kind of action this rod has? Fast? Slow? (You might have surmised that I am a novice spey caster:) Also, it seems that spey casters are very particular about which lines work best with which rod. Any ideas on a line for my rod? Thanks in advance for the good info and advice.
     
  2. Big K1

    Big K1 Large Member

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    Depending on which version it is it is either slow or slower! :D
    As far as lines 9/10/11 windcutter with tip 2 removed, 7/8/9 full length windcutter, 7/8 midspey.
     
  3. Big Tuna

    Big Tuna Member

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    K1,
    When you say to remove tip 2 are you referring to the floating tip?

    Thanks.

    Jon
     
  4. Big K1

    Big K1 Large Member

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    Jon,

    Tip 2 is the middle section of a windcutter. Remove that and attach your sinktip to the main line.You will then have a 35' head including sinktip (Mike Kinney style).
     
  5. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

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    At the risk of being too "Inside Baseball": The 9140-4 has a reputation as a versatile, user-friendly, easy- to-learn-with rod, rather slow in action, with not an excess of power in the butt. Some say it's more of an 8- than a 9-weight. I consider mine to be lively and with plenty of backbone for most purposes. I've cast it with a heavy-wire 2/0 fly and dense sinktip with no problems. The original "brownie" (brown shaft) version made its reputation. The newer dark green, olive, and dark brown versions are slightly stiffer. George Cook calls it "the all-purpose Northwest spey rod, from the Umpqua to the Babine and all points in between." He recommends the Rio WindCutter 8/9/10 or the MidSpey 8/9; I use the very similar S. A. Mastery 8/9.
    The 9140-3 is a different animal, stronger and faster, with a great rep for handling sinktips.
     

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