Spray-On UV

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by Stonefish, Feb 5, 2013.

  1. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    Since some materials are now available in UV, I've been toying around with spray-on UV.
    It seems to do a pretty good job of making the material pop under UV light, especially the flash material.
    Here is a bucktail I tied. I then sprayed it with UV and litit up with my UV curing light. Not the best pics, but bottom fly pops pretty good compared to a untreated fly. I kind of gives off a blue hue.

    I haven't fished it yet, so I'm curious how long it will stay on the materials.
    Has anyone else played around with this stuff? If so I'd like to hear your thoughts on it.
    Thanks,
    SF photo.JPG UV.JPG
     
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  2. jwg

    jwg Active Member

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    What brand spray on?
    looks nice!

    Jay
     
  3. Gray Ghost

    Gray Ghost Member

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    I been using CS Coatings UV Blast on many of my flies the last couple of years, along with a lot of uv materials. It is the most visible on metallic, mylar and seams to be fairly permanent stuff after applying it. I have not noticed it wearing off much. Keep it off your leader, it will not come off. I try to spray it very sparsely and not saturate the fly. I'll tape off the hook on flies tied on to a hook before spraying it. Tube flies work great, because the hook and leader are added after the uv spray.

    UV sprayed flies have fished well, the fish seem to like the added dimension to them.

    GG
     
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  4. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    GG,
    Thanks for the input. Good tips on taping off the hook and keeping it off the leader.
    I'm using the UV Blast as well. I've been using it for awhile now on some gear, but this is the first time I've used it on flies. I'm glad to hear it stays on the materials.
    SF
     
  5. Irafly

    Irafly Active Member

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    I like it!
     
  6. Jeff Dodd

    Jeff Dodd Active Member

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    This is very cool. Last time I looked into this I was told it would not last long, but that was from a tackle salesperson....
     
  7. Tacoma Red

    Tacoma Red Active Member

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  8. Eyejuggler

    Eyejuggler Beech Nut

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    Could you coat it under a UV head dressing or other head shellac and have it last indefinitely on specific parts of the fly?
     
  9. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    EJ,
    Yes, you can do that.
    You can also use the UV Blast Clear Seal Coat Tacoma Red mentioned to seal your head.

    I just painted a bunch of jig heads with vinyl paint for a friend. I used a clear non UV clear coat first. I then applied UV Blast. When the UV Blast dries, it looks milky and dulls the first coat of clear coat. The UV Blast dries really fast. Once the Blast dried, I applied another coat of clear coat to get a glossy head. The head really pops with the UV sealed between the two layers of clear coat.

    All of the CS Coatings clear coats and seal coats products give you a very durable finished product which would be great for beach fishing.
    SF
     
  10. Drifter

    Drifter Active Member

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    WOW great thread guys and thanks for the information and links! I started using a UV dubbing for tails on my mini buggers and seemed to work real well. love the idea of the markers - glowing blood red chiro's
    OH MY!!!
     
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  11. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    Here are a couple of pics of chironomids treated with UV Blast. Sorry not the greatest pics.
    These are Chromies. As you can see the bug on the right in the first picture has kind of a white milky color to it. That is how the UV Blast looks when it is dry.
    The second picture shows it under UV light. It glows kind of white. I think putting a coat of Hard as Nails over the top of the UV Blast will tone down the glow a bit.
    I agree with Gray Ghost regarding putting it on sparsely. Since it is clear it is a bit difficult to gauge how much you are putting on. I put way too much on this chromie. I think you could make some pretty cool mottled patterns with it as well.
    photo.JPG
    photo.JPG
     
  12. Drifter

    Drifter Active Member

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    I have fished vertical in 35 feet of water with chiro's and this would be the cats meow for deep water fishing!
     
  13. silvercreek

    silvercreek Active Member

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    Think about it guys. This is NOT UV reflectance. It is fluorescence.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescence

    If it were UV reflectance, the UV would be reflected back WITHOUT ANY COLOR CHANGE. Instead the UV radiation is absorbed and emitted at a lower (visible) wavelength. Basically, this is what laundry detergents with UV "whiteners" do. They absorb invisible (to us) UV in sunlight and emit white light making whites look "whiter". So they make things brighter by taking radiation we cannot detect (UV) and converting it into radiation we can detect (visible spectrum). That additional visible radiation is added to the radiation we can see and so there is more light coming from the fluorescent item. Hence the term "brightening" because the items appear as if they reflect more light.

    Fluorescence involves a conversion of energy. No energy conversion is 100% efficient, so a high energy photon of light is converted into a lower energy photon of light. That is why the the UV light is converted into visible light. UV light has a shorter wavelength and is higher energy than visible light. So UV invisible light is converted into the lower wavelength visible (blue and lower) end of the spectrum. The emitted color has a longer wavelength and lower energy than the energy absorbed. That is also why we don't have a visible fluorescence with red light because it would convert the red into invisible infrared radiation.

    There is a difference between the two forms of light we see. The normal light is reflected so the amount of light reflected depends on the color of the item and the amount of that color in the incident light. The fluorescent light is not reflected. It is emitted and it depends upon how much of the incident light is absorbed and transformed into the emitted light.

    We do not see UV radiation below 380 nm. So if the spray on stuff reflected UV below 380 nm, we would not see it at all. But we are seeing the fly on the right "glow" and that is fluorescence.

    Fluorescent tying materials have been around for a long time. In my opinion this is marketing using the current "hot" phrase "UV" to sell a fluorescent spray.

    Finally, a mirror reflects all light and you cannot "reflect" more UV light than is available at the water depth. So tinsel should reflect the upper UV light that is available and visible to fish. Furthermore, fish are not sensitive to the entire UV spectrum and there is debate whether adult trout lose or retain the UV cone that they had as parr.

    My belief is that these activated flies do NOT mimic nature, but stand out and act as attractors. The only way a fish has to investigate is to take it in it's mouth, and that is how attractors flies work.

    How much the flies that are treated with this spray will glow depends totally on how much UV light is at the depth of the fly. If you want a fly to glow, use a long delay spray on phosphorescent or phosphorescent tying material and activate it with sunlight during the day and a UV light at night. Then it will continue to glow even if there is no light at depth.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphorescence

    The tying materials below a phosphorescent and will continue to glow in the absence of light.

    Fire Fox Yarn

    Yarn Material for Fly Tying (Fly Tying, Fly Tying Materials, Yarns at TCO Fly Fishing)

    Lilleys' Landing Tackle Store :: Fly Tying Materials :: Thread, tinsel, vinyl rib :: Fox Fire Yarn (Phosphorescent) on spools

    Phosphorescent Tinsel

    Loon Phosphorescent Hard Head
     
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  14. jimmydub

    jimmydub Active Member

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    I think silvercreek really nailed it with that post, from what UV truly is to how it relates to fish. It could be possible that fish that feed at low light have more UV detecting cells, but fish can basically "see" vibrations in water with their lateral lines, and don't rely as much on vision in low light. I think patterns with a focus on vibration, reflection, and silhouette are the way to go in deep-water or low light conditions.

    There are some food items for salmon that do glow, like squid. Phosphorescent materials can go a long way to imitating naturally phosphorescent creatures.
     

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