Spring Steelhead in the PACNW

Discussion in 'Steelhead' started by Great Lakes Man, Jan 6, 2008.

  1. Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

    Posts: 3,861
    Pipers Creek
    Ratings: +1,263 / 1
    And now, back to our regularly scheduled programming.

    GLM,
    As you can see, you'll want to be sure to bring both your steelie and trout outfits.
  2. FT Active Member

    Posts: 1,242
    Burlington, WA
    Ratings: +102 / 0
    Salmo G,

    Scott told me the same thing about doing it just to p.o. the sportsfishers that blame the tribe for the lack of fish when he allowed Robert to net in March. He knows I disagree with his reason for doing so, but the handfull of fish Robert got was really of no consequence to the run. In fact, the poacher (a "sportsfisher from Ferndale) that got busted in April that year had far more wild fish in his freezer than Robert got in his net.

    Folks, the Upper Skagit, Sauk-Suiattle, and Swinomish tribes are not the problem. They have only fished steelhead 2 days/week in December to mid-February for the last 10 years. Typically the tribes fish the Skagit from Sunday at noon until Tuesday at noon. And yes, they have quite a few fish cops out enforcing it. This means that there is ample opportunity for fish to get upriver and avoid the nets the other 5 days/week when the nets are not in the river.
  3. Smalma Active Member

    Posts: 2,831
    Marysville, Washington
    Ratings: +707 / 0
    Will posted the following link in the Skagit/Sauk closure discussion - Take a look at the graph and apy close attention to the harvest levels of wild fish in recent years and for that matter who has caught the fish over the years.

    http://www.wildsteelheadcoalition.or...rts 2006.pdf


    What you folks want the agency to do different that would improve the returns. It is clear that the major factor driving the current status of the Puget Sound and Georgia Basin steelhead returns has been exceptionally poor marine survival. As indicated in the graph provided by Will harvest has not been the problem (except who gets to have that little bit of impact).

    One of the frustrating things is that when marine survivals improve we will still have an ESA listed stock and best guess is that it would take most of a decade or more for the Feds to be comfortable in de-listing the populations. I can foresee a situation where the good runs without any target fishing for several years; unless they are willing to think outside of past boxes. Given as often as they have been sued in the past over allowing "excessive" incidiental impacts and with folks like CCA rattling their lawsuits sabers it would be surprising that they would risk another suit to allow a target impact regardless of how minimal it might be.

    Tight lines
    Curt

    Tight lines
    Curt
  4. Jeremy Floyd fly fishing my way through life

    Posts: 2,568
    Quesnel, BC
    Ratings: +322 / 0
    broken link Curt
  5. Smalma Active Member

    Posts: 2,831
    Marysville, Washington
    Ratings: +707 / 0
  6. Jeremy Floyd fly fishing my way through life

    Posts: 2,568
    Quesnel, BC
    Ratings: +322 / 0
  7. Great Lakes Man New Member

    Posts: 10
    Burlington, NJ
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    Wow folks,
    I didn't mean to start a fire here. I guess I should consider our great lakes steel head fishery a blessing. We had a similar problem here with the Atlantic Salmon. Development and over fishing when they used to commercial fish the great lakes, caused a Catastrophic loss of Atlantic Salmon Stocks. But when development slowed down and the Clean water act started making the great lakes a viable fishery they stocked King, Coho, and Steel head into the system. They started to put Atlantic back into the system but they have to compete with the Invasive stocks. There is evidence that the Atlantic Salmon are successfully breeding in Lake Ontario, on the Salmon River but it is limited. Protect your natural stocks. Running hatcheries also causes Nitrate problems. The PA Hatcheries have been under fire for Nutrient pollution causing crashes in natural brook trout populations. C&R is a way to restore the natural stocks in any fishery. But everybody has to agree to it, including the Tribes and the Commercial lines. All need to come to the table. It is unfair that only the guys who wet lines on vacation or on weekends are the only ones that have to comprimise. Humans have put a lot of pressure on nature. I am afraid of the day when Mother Nature strikes back. I hope my kid can someday catch one out there. I will bring my 5 wt to see if I can get over to the Yakima. Thanks to all for the Info. and good luck to the hawks.

    GLM