SRC spawning time

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by tackleman, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. tackleman

    tackleman New Member

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    With some recent rains bringing local streams and rivers up after being relatively low, I'm thinking its spawning time.
    Are the fish in the sound doing the same? Certainly seems to be a lot less fishing activity being reported even though Ed can find 'em.
     
  2. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    In most of Washington's waters, sea-run cutthroat spawn from February through June, activity usually peaking in March. Biologists divide sea-run cutthroat into two categories: early- and late-entry. Early-entry fish are typical of larger rivers while late-entries predominate in smaller creeks which empty directly into salt water.

    Early-entry fish may return to fresh water as early as July and continue to come in through the late summer and fall and even into winter even though they will not spawn until spring. Late-entry fish will remain in salt water until late winter before heading quickly upstream to spawn. This is probably an evolved response to the lesser availability of food in small streams and the difficulty of reaching the best spawning areas under low-flow conditions.

    March and April are also the months during which pink and chum salmon eggs deposited the previous fall begin to hatch. Both pink and chum fry spend very little time in fresh water, beginning their downstream migration as soon as they swim up out of the gravel at a length of only about one inch. These fry, in their millions, provide ample forage for hungry cutthroat who follow them back down to salt water.
     

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