SRC's in a Lemon Dill Sauce

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Go Fish, Sep 2, 2008.

  1. Les Johnson

    Les Johnson Les Johnson

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    It might be better if we called these great trout Coastal Cutthroat, or Sea-Run Cutthroat rather than SRCs, which somewhat demeans their status in my opinion. Telling some ignorant soul that they've just caught a SRC doesn't sound like such a bad thing to do. We really need to add some $$$$ to the state budget and target it for ennforcement. If we started really coming down on these people, ignorant or knowing poachers, things would get better pretty fast. Another thing is to change the law to make them catch-and-release in rivers as well as the marine environmnet.
    Les Johnson
     
  2. Milt Roe

    Milt Roe Member

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    More enforcement is badly needed, but that is a very expensive fix and we'll never get enough to cover the need. How about more information posted at the launches, in the kayak stores, and in the tackle shops? I know WFC posted some nice informational flyers at many launches recently covering SRC and bull trout conservation. That's a cheap way to reduce impacts from ignorant anglers, and education about the resource creates more advocates for the resource. In this case, I am pretty sure that a little more education before they hit the water would have made a difference.
     
  3. alpinetrout

    alpinetrout Banned or Parked

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    That's not exactly correct. When fishing with bait, any fish caught, whether kept or released, counts as part of the limit. Therefore, if you fished bait in C&R water, the first fish you caught and released would put you over the limit.
     
  4. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Just a little background on the catch-and-release regulation for sea-run cutthroat in salt water: Thanks to Les and others, one of the main reasons we were able to get the marine area restriction put into place is because sea-run cutthroat stocks, while in salt water, are mixed. Stocks from a healthy, productive streams may very likely to be mixed with cutthroat populations from a stream or river that is just barely hanging on and a consumptive fishery over these mixed stocks might very well do that stream in; a powerful argument. In the rivers, if additional protection is deemed necessary, there are other options. As mentioned, the 14-inch minimum ensures that any cutthroat caught will, most likely, have spawned at least once.

    Whether we have the data to accurately determine which in-stream populations need additional protection is an entirely different matter. When the WDFW analysis of the health of most of western Washington's sea-run cutthroat populations in the "not determined" category one can only pray for more data and wonder where the money to fund such research will come from.
     
  5. ChrisW

    ChrisW AKA Beadhead

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    I believe that rule only applies to trout (as in small t trout- not including steelhead) caught in freshwater. But I could be wrong...there is always a first time for everything.

    Not advocating a position just my interpretation of the regs

    iagreeCW
     
  6. ChrisW

    ChrisW AKA Beadhead

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    iagreeI agree Les
    terms like "rezzies" "chromers" and even "blackmouth" might be fitting for hatchery stocks which are set up specifically for consumption. But they blur the line with wild fish. How many "shakers" do we think are actually wild juvenile Chinook or wild cutthroat?

    Wild fish would benefit by people using their proper name, not just for the sake of the people doing the talking but also those listening, ESPECIALLY on the internet....

    An example: "I released a nice native coho today probably 10lbs but I didn't want to handle it too much. I kept a 6lb hatchery coho for the BBQ, and then at the end of the day I was rewarded with a nice sea-run cutthroat which rose to a popper and was carefully released.

    Compare that to "Man we slayed the rezzies today, then Joe caught a fat chromer which we kept for the BBQ. Lots of shakers and dogfish though."
     

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