starting to get it

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by cuponoodle breakfast, Jul 5, 2013.

  1. cuponoodle breakfast

    cuponoodle breakfast Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    1,702
    Likes Received:
    342
    Location:
    Arlington
    After only being at it a few weeks my spey casting really came together today. I got the feel for modifying my snap t when changing between sink tips and a full floater and was slinging it out there with ease. The other change was just keeping my hands in closer for a more compact stroke. It felt pretty good to "get it."
     
    Jamie Wilson and Ed Call like this.
  2. Luke77

    Luke77 I hope she likes whitefish

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Messages:
    1,683
    Media:
    35
    Likes Received:
    436
    Location:
    Yakima, WA
    Prepare to hang up single handers now, because that's the next evolution.

    Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk 4 Beta
     
  3. Jeremy Floyd

    Jeremy Floyd fly fishing my way through life

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    2,625
    Media:
    176
    Likes Received:
    378
    Location:
    Quesnel, BC
    There is no reason to discriminate between 1 and 2 hand rods.. I learned all the spey moves on a 1h rod, and used them for years, before I even bought a 2h rod. I think it is great practice just getting a feel for the load of the line regardless of rod length. Once you get the feel there is nothing you can't do with either rod.

    Being able to snap T or double spey, and then double haul into your D loop, and double haul again on the forward movement with a single hand rod will allow you to air out the entire length of most fly lines. It commonly makes jaws drop too.
     
  4. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Messages:
    1,999
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    Bellingham, WA, USA.
    During my learning phase as a spey caster, I noticed that a cast was either successful or unsuccessful. The feedback was immediate, and lead to steady improvement. That's a large part of the fascination of spey casting. I also learned that when a cast was going to be successful, I could usually tell when partway through it. It's true with both spey and single hand casting that when the backcast/D loop is properly timed and executed, that a successful forward stroke is more or less automatic.
     

Share This Page