steelhead/salmon photo's

Discussion in 'Steelhead' started by threadjob2004, Oct 14, 2004.

  1. threadjob2004

    threadjob2004 New Member

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    While fishing last week, I ran into a fish and wildlife guy writing tickets to a few bait fisherman that were lifting the fish out of the water for a photo op, then releasing native steelhead back into the water. At first, I had some angst toward the drift rod guys, but then wondered how many people are actually aware fo the new law or those that choose to ignore the law.

    I was cruising through the photo gallery on this site and noticed there are several steelhead photo's of people holding the stealhead out of the water. these photo's are dated oct 2004.

    My question is - what gives with this rule? do you know about and de-hook the fish in the water (no photo's), do you not know, or do you know and choose to do what you want?

    Just curious. people talk about mortality rates, incorrect fish handling, etc. and I'm wondering what the masses are thinking??

    CHris
     
  2. alpinetrout

    alpinetrout Banned or Parked

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    I think the photos you mention are all from BC, where there is no "out of water" rule. The rule in this state wasn't created because of people lifting fish out of the water for 10 seconds for a quick photo opp. It was designed to target the people who beach fish, lift them into boats to flop around, or otherwise beat the hell out of the fish while they're out of the water. A quick lift out of the water does less damage than the average leap up a waterfall. That being said, we still have to follow the rule if we expect the beachers and boaters to do the same. You can get great fish photos like these without removing the fish from the water:

    http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=3203&sort=1&cat=500&page=1

    http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=2934&sort=1&cat=500&page=1
     
  3. GreenButt

    GreenButt New Member

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    Its a good, maybe a great rule, but as you say, easy to forget in the excitement of the moment. Old habits are hard to break. Supposedly it is to prevent people from dragging fish onto a beach or spending five minutes holding a fish (and often dropping it) trying to get the perfect photo. If this rule works at all it will be beneficial. Personally I think its great to hear its being enforced. Probably will take a long time for folks to get used to. Besides I'd rather see a photo of a properly handled and released fish in the water.

    You could say that the benefit is probably negligable given other WDFW and NOAA management policies and practices, or that they could make a bigger difference in other ways and that would be true. At least its something.
     
  4. clockwork

    clockwork New Member

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    in truth, i think it's easier to unhook a fish while its in the water. if the fish is reasonably tired, they usually comply fairly well. on the other hand if you take that fish out of the water, it will begin to flop wildly. further, i think fish that are netted are pretty much gonners. have you ever seen what a salmon can do when netted? they get hopelessly tangled. the net wraps around their head, gets in their mouth and gills and gets wrapped around the hook, etc etc to where extraction nears impossible. i think this is the basis of the law because most people who bring a fish out of the water do so with a net. unfortunately ive not been able to find a salmon-safe net like we have for Ffishing. fish wont have many scales on it when its done, even if it does survive the net itself. its a totally reasonable law, in reality fish stay much calmer, and thus safer if left in the water.

    personally i had to sacrifice a good photo op of what must have been a 30+lb king at sekiu(on gear) this year. not to mention some healthy native silvers. what i do when im fixin to keep some is identify the fish first and if its a keeper then net it. i think its basically traditional in salmon fishing to net first ask questions later. and i think it dies hard with alot of them, especially old schoolers. -ryan
     
  5. HeavyWader

    HeavyWader New Member

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    hat rule is new for 2004 and I think most of the gallery photos we're taken before then so they are OK. But yes you cannot take a fish completely out of the water now.
     
  6. msteudel

    msteudel Mark Steudel

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    Any fish? Or just particular fish?
     
  7. Scott Behn

    Scott Behn Active Member

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    Fish that are unattainable i.e., wild steelhead and native salmon unless specified in the special regs...read'em, I did

    :eek:

    Just being a smartass...sorry!!!!
     
  8. kodiaksalmon

    kodiaksalmon Jeff B.

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    Since we're talking about handling fish, and getting pictures, does anyone out there use a Boga Grip? I started using them about five years ago, and let me tell you, they are a God send. I was losing so many big silvers at my side when I tried to tail them or get a hand on them after they tired out. They'd start thrashing again, and on the short end of my line right at my hip, they'd be off in no time. I started using the Boga and as the fish tired, I'd ease them toward me and as I use flies tied point up, the fish is usually hooked in the top jaw, so they come in mouth open, and you get them by the bottom jaw, and they ain't going nowhere. I can leave the fish in the water, remove the hook, take pictures, revive them, and then release them and never even lay a hand on the fish at all. I agree with the above comment about nets, and it is hard to find a feasable net for big fish. I've gotten many a stare from other guys as they see me with it hanging off my back where their net is hanging. But the ability it gives me to land and release fish untouched is worth the weight and the questions I get about it. And pictures being as important as they are, likewise the life span of the fish as important as it is everyone here knows handling the fish as little as possible is the way to go. So to answer the original question, what was already said above about the law not being targeted at those of us who already know how to handle fish is true. But it is there and it behooves us to act responsibly and treat the fish as they deserve to be treated.

    Take care all,
    Jeff
     
  9. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    Well anything that is required to be released cannot be brought out of the water. But if it is legal to keep and you are going to,then by all means you can take it out of the water. But that rule does it apply to adult fish or all fish.

    Jim
     
  10. Charlie Erdman

    Charlie Erdman In search of steel

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    to be honest, I did not know that rule existed. I am actually quite ashamed of myself for not knowing that rule, as last weekend I took a steelhead out of the water to look at it for a second as it was my first steelhead and I had never seen one before. Does anyone know if oregon has similar rules?

    Thanks for informing me about that rule, as I will never take a steelhead out of the water again.

    Charlie
     
  11. Steelie Mike

    Steelie Mike Active Member

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    Natives

    Over the years I have seen lots of pictures of native steelhead, salmon and trout in magazines. On the odd occasion you see a pre-spawn or spawning fish that is dropping eggs or sperm into the water because of good old gravity. This always disgusted me, but even more so when I lifted my first native steelie out of the water and she started to do the same. I cannot tell you how ashamed I was of that event. :beathead: Especially because I know that river was suffering from a lack of native fish. I apploud WDFW for ticketing people for this. I learned my lession without a fine, but others may need to learn with a hole in their pocket. Before this post I did not know it was illegal to take a natives out of the water. Thanks for the post.