Stinky Pinkies

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Guillaume, Aug 28, 2005.

  1. Guillaume New Member

    Posts: 76
    Woodinville, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    "Stinky" Pinkies

    Hmmm this thread title should attract the people tired of hearing that pinks stink (to those, fear not) and of course those who really think so. I'd like to offer my 2 cents on this.
    Next time you go to the supermarket, whether it is Costco or you favorite local one, look at what consumers buy. Often you'll see Atlantic Salmon in their cart. Oh yeah, that wonderful stuff that is farm raised, fed plastic and paper pellets and fire retardant. That's right, fire retardant. Add a wonderful pinch of industrial orange dye and..tadaaaaaaa...you have "fresh salmon"!
    And here we are going on and on on how pinks stink. Disgusting, stinky, wild pink salmon with its pale rosy flesh. Bech, I want my fire retardant flavored salmon! Also note that the same people disgusted by pinks also eat hormone pumped beef and arsenic fed chicken. But that's another story.
    2 years ago I remember fishing the salt and seeing a teen catch a salmon, and then shout "Oh, s***, it's a pink".
    As many members here have said, pinks from the salt, once bled and put on ice right away, are perfectly decent tasting on the bbq, smoked, in fish cakes, you name it. How many times have you seen people catch a pink, dump it alive on the shore and let to suffocate? Oh, gee, I wonder why it doesn't taste that great!
    As far as I'm concerned, I'll eat a bright pink over a farm raised salmon any time. Not only is it better tasting, it is also healthier (no kidding). And when people ask me about pinks, whether they are kids or adults, that's what I'll tell them. That and "never buy farm raised salmon here in the pacific NW when wild salmon is almost always readily available".
    That's my "stinky pink" ranting for the day :cool:
  2. Scott Behn Active Member

    Posts: 1,201
    Lk Stevens, Wa.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    iagree . Done correctly they taste great!!!!!

    Here's some I just got off the barby...
  3. Guillaume New Member

    Posts: 76
    Woodinville, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Looks good Scott! Just finished smoking a bunch. Here's a great recipe for those who like smoked salmon. The high fat content of humpies is perfect for it:

    1 Qt. of distilled water
    1 1/2 cup of Whiskey or Bourbon
    1/2 cup of brown sugar
    6 tsp. of non-iodized salt (canning salt)
    1 tsp. of Garlic powder
    1 tsp. of fresh ground black pepper

    Mix ingredients thoroughly.
    Place salmon into brine, and let sit for at least 8 to 12 hours
    before smoking (the longer the better).
    remove salmon from brine and rinse lightly.
    Place on paper towel, skin side down for 30 Minutes.
    Place on Smoker, and add ground pepper.

    Smoke preparation.
    I use Alder wood.
    Smoke Samon for 10 to 12 hours at 110°-140°F
  4. Scott, that bbq fish looked pretty good, what did you use to put on the fish?

    And thanks too for that smoked fish recipie also, sounds good. Last humpie year I pickled a couple of fish and they turned out pretty good. Also you can smoke and then pickle the fish which turns out really good.
  5. Guillaume New Member

    Posts: 76
    Woodinville, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Hedburner, when you say "pickle", do you mean cure them in salt and sugar? I do this with the sockeye I catch in AK when I go there. I add dill and black pepper too.
    Now that I installed an oven thermostat on my smoker (i'll have to post how to do this one day, this is pretty cool), I can "cold" smoke, and will try to smoke the cured fish briefly. :p
  6. No, pickle as in pickled herring or smelt, in vinegar and pickling spices. Can't remember the exact recipie but I found it on the internet someplace under a pickled fish recipe search.
  7. Guillaume New Member

    Posts: 76
    Woodinville, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I'll have to try that too!
  8. Ron Crawford ===

    Posts: 210
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Aside from the helpful and tasty follow on posts - let's just remember the jist of the original post.

    Any wild salmon kicks the a$$ off a lousy farmed salmon (in flavor and in spirit). Anyone that brings a salmon to the fly should oppose farmed atlantic salmon in these parts. There are so few of our beautiful pacific creatures, the last thing we need is a bunch of imposters in our home waters.

    Sorry - this probably belongs on the conservation page...
  9. chadk Be the guide...

    Posts: 5,057
    Snohomish, WA.
    Ratings: +41 / 0
    Right, so let's eat all the wild ones ;)
  10. chadk Be the guide...

    Posts: 5,057
    Snohomish, WA.
    Ratings: +41 / 0
    Actually I ate some chrome salt caught pinks the other day. Turned out awesome on the BBQ. One was cooked in vinagarette dressing and the other an asian ceasar dressing. Both were GREAT and quickly devoured by all at the table.
  11. Skagit Angler I miss Ed's Sports

    Posts: 51
    North Puget Sound
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    I find farm raised salmon insulting & disgusting.. I only eat wild sockeye, silver & king.. and then not much, but what I eat is cherished. Did you know the BC gov't has ok'd the placement of penned salmon farm near the mouth of the Skeena?? Ignorant, uncaring or greased pockets?

    Sorry for the rant... :beathead:
  12. Chris Bellows The Thought Train

    Posts: 1,681
    The Salt
    Ratings: +823 / 0
    well, i'll jump off this pink love bandwagen.

    i hate to break it to you, but pinks do not have a high fat content compared to other wild salmon. would i rather eat pinks than farm raised atlantic salmon?.. yes.... but give me some other options (such as coho or king salmon) and the answer would be an loud NO.

    a true test of how good salmon taste is how they are cooked. every picture and recipe mentioned goops up the salmon with other flavors. a good piece of fish can stand on its own... grilled plain with maybe some salt and pepper. a piece of king or coho is outstanding cooked this way. a pink is okay cooked plain, but doesn't stand up to other wild salmon.
  13. kodiaksalmon Jeff B.

    Posts: 946
    Muskie country!
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    There was pretty much the same attitude in Kodiak, and everyone who kept their pinks to eat pickled and canned them. They seem well suited to this treatment.

    Jeff
  14. chadk Be the guide...

    Posts: 5,057
    Snohomish, WA.
    Ratings: +41 / 0
    There is a big difference in Alaska, and other places were you can catch a lot of fish and a variety of species.

    If it is common to fill your freezer with salmon, pinks just don't make sense to keep unless canning, pickling, smoking, etc. Just trying to freeze the fresh fillets for another day doesn't work like it does for silvers and kings.

    But for those of us who eat a few (or a few dozen) freshly caught salmon per year - keeping a few bright fresh pinks to eat within 24 to 48hrs (max) isn't a bad deal. If I were to catch a silver and a pink and chose to bonk them, I'd eat the pink fresh that day and freeze the silver for another time.

    There's nothing wrong with adding a little flavor. I do it for almost any fish I catch - just for variety. While a lot of fish taste fine with minimal flavoring - it can get old after a while eating it the same way all the time...
  15. Bradly640 New Member

    Posts: 40
    Bellingham ,WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    We bbq'd a pink out of the salt last week. We blead it right off the bat, gutted and put on ice. It turned out to be some of the best salmon I have ever had. So, im not sure why some don't like it. I think its all in the way its handled and prepaired. :beer2:
  16. Smalma Active Member

    Posts: 2,831
    Marysville, Washington
    Ratings: +707 / 0
    Talking of fat content in salmon - one of the major health benefits from eating seafood is the amount of omega 3 fats found in seafood. These fats have been linked to cardic and other health benefits.

    The following site:

    http://www.nyseafood.org/nutrition/health2.asp

    Shows that pink salmon and chinook salmon are consider to have high omega 3 contents while coho, sockeye and chum while have good concentrations of these healthy fats have lower levels than pinks.

    I think it also important to recognize that individual tastes differ, I know some folks that dis-like any salmon (have a son like that), others who would not touch a beef steak, others who think crab or clams are horrible food not fit for human consumption. Fortunately there are many different tastes in this world and we all don't have to fit in the same box.

    Tight lines

    Curt
  17. Salvelinus Member

    Posts: 187
    WA
    Ratings: +2 / 0
    Flyfishneahbay, I thought that high fat concentrations were found in the best eating salmon ie. chinook and that is why they tasted so good. :confused:
  18. Bob Triggs Your Preferred Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide

    Posts: 4,020
    Olympic Peninsula
    Ratings: +684 / 0
    Smalma, can you provide us with a link to resources and information on toxins in wild salmon fish flesh?
  19. Beckler Member

    Posts: 104
    Redmond, WA
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    I think Chad made a great point, we are lucky to have this opportunity in our backyard. I'm sure if I could hook as many Kings and Silvers on the fly as I do pinks I would have a preference, but these fish come readily to the fly and my whole family enjoys them, smoked or on the Barbie. I grew up in the midwest so just to be able to hook Salmon from a city beach and then prepare it for dinner that night is awesome in my book. :thumb:
  20. Chris Bellows The Thought Train

    Posts: 1,681
    The Salt
    Ratings: +823 / 0
    it is the high fat content that imo makes salmon tasty (i don't know if it's high omega-3's that make it taste good). everyone has different tastes. for me, the greasier the salmon the better (give me the collar and belly of a 30-40 pound king any day). some people like milder fish, and pinks fit that taste range perfectly.

    again, i have never said pinks are unfit for consumption... i just prefer stronger flavored salmon. and yes, pinks demand quick bleeding and gutting to retain their table quality.

    as for flavorings... of course we all add flavor to our salmon... but the point remains that most recipes regarding pinks involve sauces... or smoked.

    chris