stocker trout

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by rockfish, Apr 30, 2003.

  1. Sean Beauchamp

    Sean Beauchamp Hot and Heavy at yer 6

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    what do i know, im just a kid

    i spent opening weekend on lake ki. i saw lots of flyfishermen but i didnt ask if they belonged to the site. i talked to several different guys about the fishing so if any of you guys talked to a young kid in a red doughnut tube (saturday) or a pontoon style tube on sunday let me know. id like to put some faces with your names. i almost alwyas wear a camo boonie hat and a yellow raincoat so if you see me out there in one of the above mentioned tubes be sure to say hi.

    anywas, back to the fishing. saturday morning i did decent on a size ten red SJ worm on a intermediate full sink line. i caught around 10 with lots of lost fish. the rest of the afternoon kinda lullled me to sleep. i just dinked around trying to get them up top with stimulators and humpy's. did ok.

    sunday was my good day. i found a great spot and i really stuck it to em. i started off by myself but people started paying attention when they kept cathing them in the same spot everytime they passed by. pretty soon there was a nice little gathering of float tubin fly flingers. if you were one of them let me know. anyways, the wind was blowing pretty regularly in the same direction so i would set myself up to where i would just make a cast, then pay out some line and drift parallel to the shore with the wind. i was drifting a size 8 olive bh wooly bugger on my intermediate full sink line. it seemed like the slower i went the more takes i got. holding your rod was the only way to do bussiness as the fish werent really hooking themselves. i was really rearing back in order to take all the slack out of the line and put the hook in the fish.

    all told i caught and released about 30 fish (very few lost fish) between 6 AM and 4 PM. the smallest fish was about 10in with most around 11 or 12. they were all pretty cookie cutter. i did manage one 16 incher on saturday and twin 17 inchers on sunday. the second 17 incher hit when i was paying out line. the line was coiled up on my apron and it was slowly paying out as i was drifting along. all of the sudden the line just started jumping off the apron. i grabbed the line and the line came tight and the rod nearly got ripped from my hand. it started jumping and then settled into the normal bulldog type fight. it didnt fight quite as well as the other two bigger fish but the way it hit really got my heart pumping.

    my typical technique was to cast out about 20 feet, then pay out about 20 more feet of line. i would drift with the wind for like 10 minutes, then i would start stripping in my line real erratically with anywhere from 2 to 12 inch strips with 2 second pauses. i would bring about half of my line in and then i would let the rest of the line back out and start all over again. i got fish at all different stages of my presentation with most right after my fly switched speeds. half of my fish hit right when i started stripping or when i started paying out line. the other half would hit when i was just drifting. see you on the water!

    ~sean~
     
  2. IveofIone

    IveofIone Guest

    IveofIone
    A lot of good responses to your question but no single clear-cut solution. Sometimes we fish too shallow, sometimes too deep or too fast or too slow. It is important to keep changing your tactics until something works and then ride that pony until it dies and try something else. All the suggestions to shorten the tail up a bit are right on the money. Also dead sharp hooks are and obvious necessity. Leaders on sinking lines need to be shorter and stouter than those used on floating lines-this overcomes some of the stretch on the initial hit and makes it easier to get the hook into the fish. Perhaps more fish are lost by improper holding of the rod and line than any other single reason. If you are fishing a sinking line, keep your rod tip in the water and pointed directly at the fly. Keep a firm grip on the line and expect a strike at any instant. No slack, no rod tip sticking up in the air and no hoping that the movement of the boat will set the hook! Usually anything in olive works well on those early season planted fish so if you are getting hits and not hookups just work on your mechanics a little bit and things will improve. Tight lines, Ive
     
  3. BOBLAWLESS

    BOBLAWLESS New Member

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    Word!

    Bob:thumb
     
  4. rockfish

    rockfish Member

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    thanks for the great replys guys, trolling those wooly buggars is probly my most consistant way the last few days.

    sparsegrey hackle I tied your pattern and caught a perch about 13 inches long and fat as can be.

    trout fishin is pretty relaxing on these calm lakes in the evening, thinking about going somewhere like rocky ford or something next week.





    saltwater flyfishing in the northwest is a science as well as an art:thumb
     
  5. hikepat

    hikepat Patrick

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    Funny how many use a wooly bugger. My luck this year with Wooly buggers has been poor so more and more I am using smaller patterns. I went out to a local King County lake Saturday that is only 15" deep at its deepest most is only 5" foot deep.The lake is known more for its bass then trout. I did not catch but one on a wooly but I caught some nice fat pigs on zug bugs with a clear slow sink line in a size 16 and 18 I even caught two cutthroat the largest was 12" and they are not planted by the state in that lake as far as I know. Sometimes a wooly is not the way to go. Often going to a smaller bait will take more fish since its only the aggressive fish that will take a bait as large as a wooly bugger. One of the rainbows I caught was 13" will a belly like a bass and it put up one heck of a fight I feel it was a one year hold over in the lake. The cutthroat as with most of the rainbows were taken out of the deep deep grass and pads on the lake in 5ft of water or less. I also caught one very long and skinny yellow perch. If you are getting lots of hits on a wooly but few hook up try a smaller pattern it may bring you more fish to hand. The nice thing about the day on this South King county lake only two others fished it the whole time I was there from 10AM till 3PM and they stayed close to the launch giving me the back side of the lake all to myself. I had about the same results fishing Tuesday and Friday on Lake Geneva even lost one of the nice trips on a smaller patterns.
     

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