Stonefly from the Cedar River today, enough detail to identify?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Entomology' started by Jim Speaker, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. Jim Speaker

    Jim Speaker Active Member

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    I'd be interested to know what, specifically, this fella is... about a #8-#10 hook - probly closer to an 8.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Jim,

    Actually, it's a mayfly nymph, probably Drunella grandis.
     
  3. Jim Speaker

    Jim Speaker Active Member

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    WOW. That's likely a western green drake nymph? I fished the Cedar hardcore the first 4 years after it re-opened and I don't think I ever saw an adult. Your WA chart on your website suggests they'd be hatching June-July. I'm not saying this in any way doubting your ability to identify, I mean, you're all over this stuff... I'm just amazed that I've never seen Green Drake adults on the Cedar or even thought to fish them there. I have, however, seen adults on the little Deschutes here and it's productive on that little river when they're happening.

    Oh, one more thing though: I haven't really fished the upper river there below Landsburg nearly as much as I fished the lower river. Would you expect they may be more prevalent in the higher gradient stream up there?

    Thanks very much!
     
  4. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Jim,
    Sure is.
    Well, that's a relief. ;)
    Perhaps, but I don't really know.

    One thing that I would recommend doing:
    [​IMG]
    Take a jar lid along next time. Place the nymph you want to photograph in it, and then add enough water to fully cover the nymph. This allows the nymph's appendages to freely move, and will result in a photo which is much more useful for identification purposes.
     
    Derek Young likes this.
  5. Jim Speaker

    Jim Speaker Active Member

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    When my son finishes those last couple pickles in the jar I'll just have to do that! Thanks.
     
  6. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Good show, Jim. As I recall, my lid was from a small jar of Sweet Gerkins. ;)
     

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