Stream Cleats?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by mtp1032, Sep 4, 2002.

  1. Hi Everyone,

    Can anyone recommend a set of stream cleats? This fall/winter I'm going to be fishing the Skagit/Sauk/Deschutes pretty heavily and last year's experience with simple felt soles was not, ah, pleasent.

    Cheers,

    Michael

    Remember, Son. Catch, Gloat, then Release.
     
  2. Hello Michael!

    Two suggestions for you.

    1. stay away from Chotas. The wife busted up her leg really bad with them. The screw heads are just too wide to get a good bite on the rocks.

    2. I really like the Simms guide boot with the "Aquasteath" soles. I started wearing them about a year ago and will not wear anything else anymore. They stick like glue and have not even began to show signs of wear after 50 or 60 trips...

    Just my 2 cents.
    :BIGSMILE
     
  3. I bought mine from Cabela's. A lot more inexpensive than other brands with the same quality.
     
  4. I love the Aguastealth soles on my LL beans too. There not studed, but they do provide me with lots of grip. I saw the post about the simms boots and having a catolog handy, I checked em out. Wow, 169 bucks, you got to be kidding me. I know simms is expensive, having simms pro guide waders, but come on. Simms stuff is high quality and it will last. My LL beans were pricey (125), but thats just insane. I personally like the chotas. I feel for rivers, felt soles with studs can't be beat. I'd go with the Cabelas. check their catalog, they make decent stuff for the price. Another 2 cents added..... :THUMBSUP YT
     
  5. I have some stream cleats that have little bent aluminium bars on the bottom. I bought mine about 10 years ago in Kaufmann's in Downtown Seattle. I just saw nicely updated ones in the Avid Angler called "Super Stream Cleats".

    They fit on your wading boots like overboots, and grip like they will never let go. Up clay banks, on deeply algaefied rocks, they never stop gripping. My only beef is that they are kind of heavy, and a bit clunky. But they rock for wintertime, or big water wading, and they are cheaper than a new pair of boots.

    Rob
     
  6. are they just regular korkers like roofing and logging, bought mine at a roofing store for around 50 $ I think when I was roofing. used to walk up and down those cedar shake roofs covered in algae pooring down rain fixing leaks and never had a mishap. they would go over my boot.
    Ben
     
  7. BEST PART ABOUT STREAM CLEATS IS THAT WHEN YOU STEP ON YOUR FLY LINE, YOU GET TO BUY A NEW ONE...YOU CAN CLIMB AND WADE WATER LIKE A MOUNTAIN GOAT, BUT THERE ARE SOME DRAWBACKS.. BE CAREFUL.
     
  8. That's also a really good reason to treat your fly line with more care than that.
     
  9. Hey, we all screw up every once in a while... Walking up the side of a river in ankle deep water while trying to keep an eye on a rising fish, false casting as you go... Experience comes in many forms, that one just happened to be a more expensive one. But you learn pretty quickly not to do that again.
     
  10. I have the Chotas and they do the job perfectly
     
  11. I came to the same conclusion, especially after fishing the Deschutes.

    For me, the problem with studs was scratching up the bottoms of drift boats and flat-out not being allowed in inflatable rafts. My solution has been to go with aqua stealth soles and also carry a pair of Dan Bailey stream cleats in a fanny pack for those times when the going gets really slippery. The stream cleats are the rubber slip overs with a felt sole and aluminum bars. The aluminum really grabs on to that lava rock you find on the Deschutes. While the aqua stealth are superior to felt soles for hiking along a stream and scrambling over rocks, I haven't found them to be as good as felt on really mossy stream bottoms, hence the need for the cleats.




    :COOK
     

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