Strike indicator or bobber

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by steve at walker lake, Sep 27, 2012.

  1. OK had a bass man call my strike indicator a bobber. Need your help for some come backs to that next time I see him.:mad:
     
  2. Does not matter as long as your catching fish and he is not. ;) Even better when he is watching and scratching his head trying to figure it out.
     
  3. I'm not going to cross that bridge, I think I see a troll under there.
     
  4. It's kind of funny how we fly fishers like to "sophisticate" our sport. It's a rod, not a "pole", an indictor, not a bobber, is a plastic bead still fly fishing. As far as I'm concerned, I like to catch fish and cast a fly line. If using an indicator/bobber makes it less of a fly fishing activity than say throwing a light cahill with a bamboo rod, so be it-I'm still having fun! Rick
     
  5. If it's sitting still doing nothing in stillwater, I call it a bobber. If it's being used in moving water, I call it an indicator.

    But in reality, they are the same thing. A visible indication that a fish has grabbed whatever you are offering it.
     
    Ed Call likes this.
  6. If it is bobbing, you are doing it wrong.
     
  7. I just call it fun.
     
  8. Someone else using it >>> bobber
    Me using it >>> strike indicator
     
  9. I think of a bobber as something that floats and positions the hook (be it covered by fur&feathers or a worm) at a certain depth.

    I think of a strike indicator as something that floats, but doesn't significantly affect the depth at which the hook presents itself in the water column.

    So, on a lake it's usually a bobber, whereas on moving water it might be either, depending on where it is positioned and how it is used. For me, it is usually a strike indicator, because I keep it high on the leader regardless of water depth; sometimes I simply use the end of my floating fly line as the "strike indicator."

    D
     
    Ed Call likes this.
  10. Let's just call it a bobbercator! Something's wrong with mine...it keeps sinking!
     
    navajoe117 and Travis Bille like this.
  11. The late, great, Lee Wolfe said "bobbers can't be pulled through the guides, while strike indicators can". That was when only yarn and/or small, collapsable indicators were the norm. Now, "Bobbers"!
     
  12. OK thanks for the help next time I go down to BIG R in Omak I can have some fun with this guy. The store is set up with the bait shop next to the fly shop and its been some good fun watching them spar back and forth.
     
  13. I like "grabometer".....
     
    troutpocket likes this.
  14. I have been slip bobber bait fishing most the week for salmon and steel, to me they are two completely different items so I call my fly fishing indicators - "indicators" and my bobbers - "bobbers" Im just glad so many fly fisherman think indicators are not fly fishing - it just makes fishing that much better for me when people "shun" the indicators, and then watch me catch fish all day! but I never use them in rivers, that's where high stick nymphing comes in.

    As far as what a bass fisherman thinks - I don't even care!
     
    BikerBilly and Irafly like this.
  15. I always enjoy stopping in at the Big R. It is a very well stocked fly shop and the rest of the store is cool as well. If fact, I'm going right by it this morning on my way to Chopaka. Rick
     
  16. Rick
    Talk to Greg. He worked on Walker lake a few years back and is doing a great job with the store.
     
  17. i just call it the floating thingy and if i really want to get technical i call it the plastic floating thingy or the foam floating thingy
     
  18. I think we should call it a "boobie". Not only would curiosity draw more people into the sport but it would be easier to hold your attention when things are slow on the lake.;)
     
  19. Already a fly named that, and trust me it fits it's name.
     
  20. My comeback would be: "So.....what's your point?" Personally, who cares. I'm going to breakdown one of these days and try using one. If someone gives me the business about it, then I have to ask myself, "Why am I really fly fishing? Is it a status thing or something?"

    If I ever answer yes to that last question, I'm going to quit.
     
    Mark Kraniger likes this.

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