The Bazooka

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by pittendrigh, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. pittendrigh

    pittendrigh Active Member

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    One way to make a large fast sinking streamer that's not so difficult to cast: tie it sparsely, tie it on a snelled hook and use a flattened built in split shot....on which some plastic eyes are glued. I used non-lead tin shot for this one. Why end to end flexibility sinks faster than the same fly tied on a long rigid shank escapes me. But so it is.

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. NewTyer1

    NewTyer1 Banned or Parked

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    Nice looking streamer. How did you get the hackle that long?
     
  3. pittendrigh

    pittendrigh Active Member

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    The answer to your question ("How did you get the hackle that long") is a bit off the deep end.
    One iron clad rule for me is "All flies, no matter what, should be simple, fast and easy to tie."

    And I do like to break the rules. Hence:

    http://montana-riverboats.com/index...ttendrigh/Flies/Streamers/Lathe/The-Lathe.jpg

    The flies in the sequence above were tied on a monofilament snell. I use Dacron backing now, because it is more supple/flexible. This has been a very good fly for me. I've been tying it and fishing it for a good five years or so now.
     

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