The importance of good wading.

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Panhandle, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. surfnfish

    surfnfish Member

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    Panhandle, if you manage to make it thru a few more decades, you'll understand being in your 60's isn't "being an old man" - I'm 60 now, and this morning I surfed for two hours in double overhead surf with 40 degree air and 52 degree water, and then spent the next several hours casting to rolling Chinook from my boat in tidewater.

    Some folks get old when their still young, and other folks remain young at heart and spirit throughout their entire life...
     
  2. nutsack angler

    nutsack angler newb

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    double overhead in oregon... get some!
     
  3. Matthew Gulbranson

    Matthew Gulbranson Resident Swinger

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    Nice! I want to be doing that when I'm 60. I can't surf worth a shit, but at least I've caught a few steelhead and salmon!
     
  4. golfman65

    golfman65 Guest

    Wading can be dramatically over rated...as well as dramatically under rated...

    I think too many guys wade to far out...they don't fish the water in close first, they don't take into account others around them...They wade out because they either don't have a clue or can't cast worth a damn....Those are the over rated ones..

    Fish the Thompson...fish the Y and some of the runs with big nasty snot covered rocks and then you'll learn really fast what good wading is and how important it can be....Most use aluminum cleats and staffs...and you still see swimmers...It's taken awhile for me to feel even a little confident out on some of that stuff and yet I marvel when seeing some of the older guys and where they stand...I am humbled...

    I agree it is a skill but one overlooked by many who assume it only means ruining good fishing water to improve their casting distance...
     
  5. SpeySpaz

    SpeySpaz still an authority on nothing

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    agreed here too-
    I usually fish pressured waters, and I've found that a strategy of fishing from knee deep or less early in the day and only wading more aggressively once the fish move into deeper channel water (after being disturbed by boats or overeager waders), can really pay off.
     
  6. surfnfish

    surfnfish Member

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  7. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Your Preferred Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide

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    Most people wade too deep, too far and too soon. If you took the time to develop your casting skills, if you got some good quality coaching and instruction over time, and practice-pratice-practice...well then your wading would take a back seat to your good casting skills. And even if you can wade up to your nose and cast 100 feet easily, and with accuracy, most fish are still going to be caught within 30 feet of the riverbanks.
     
  8. Paul Huffman

    Paul Huffman Lagging economic indicator

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    I have a wading Lab. Even as a pup, he showed a proclivity to stay by my side when making a crossing, perhaps from ancestors that worked as guide dogs. After working with him over the years, he knows what his job is when we reach a crossing point. He even remembers places where we've crossed before, and eagerly anticipates his duty. I say "Are you going to help me, Billy?" and he takes his place at my side. What he hasn't figured out by himself is that I want him on the downstream side of me. He mostly lines up on the left, so sometimes I have to reposition him. I grab onto his collar, and off we go. We can cross some tough spots. As the water gets deeper and faster, he sometimes gets swept off his feet and his rear rotates downstream, but he paddles hard to keep up. Even when he's swept off his feet, his bulk can be very stabilizing for me. Near the opposite bank, he touches down, then helps me up on the bank. Even though I've stepped on his toes with studded felts many times, he still loves his job.

    Another good service he provides is coming out into the river to get me when I've worked to the bottom of a run. The sound of reeling in alerts him that I might be ready for him.

    If you ever see a guy crossing a river with a 100 lb. chocolate beside him, that would be us.
     
  9. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

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    I got to agree with you Pan, wading is an overlooked and rarely mentioned skill.

    I've been crawling around rivers all my life, and it's just second nature to me to wade agressively and I know by experience when I'm right on the edge and need to pull back, use a stick, or should look down stream to analyze my risk and exposure scenario if I want to risk taking a swim. Don't overlook demonstrating basic wading techniques if you're taking a novice out fishing, because probably no body has ever taught them.
     
  10. thewaker

    thewaker Tight line takes ain't no fakes!!

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    The importance of good wading.Bad and Good

    The bad:

    As mentioned above many wade too deep to quick. Also,it's not only about safety, it's about all the fish you walk on to get to a place where you think you should start fishing. I saw a guy the other day out 60 or 70 feet in the middle of the river trying to stand up and fish in a heavy current. Not too bright! Not to mention that probably every steelhead in the ditch was between him and the bank! Kind of silly to watch but if he would have lost his footing out there he would have been swept a long ways down river before he would have gotten out. That would not have been too funny as he was a bit of an older gentleman. Basically, he could have lost his footing, went under, took a big drink and drowned right in front of me and it would have been hard to reach him as he would have been swept way below me very fast.

    The good:

    A good example of why it is smart to start fishing and wading in shallow water occurred the other day. I was on the Deschutes at WS fishing above the boat ramp. I started in way up high in the riffle in about ankle deep water. I took my fly of my hook keeper and flipped it out in about a foot and a half of water. First swing starts to come around and Whamo! fish on and tearing line of the reel, a nice steelhead. This fish was in so close I am surprised I didn't step on him. He jumps and rips around,I fight him for 45 seconds or so and he comes unpinned. Who cares, I got the best part of him. Standing in the same spot, a make about three more casts and hook another nice fish. Both of these fish were in LESS than 2 feet of water in very close to the bank.

    Sometimes it pays to stay dry!

    Mark
     
  11. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    A HUGE THANKS to board member David Loy!!

    PM today on a possible 'solution' to my 'issue.' So simple, so great, what can I add!!????:thumb:

    fae
     
  12. Bob Jones

    Bob Jones Still truckless now farther away

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    Fred, I just saw this thread today so couldn't answer sooner . I've never been an agresive wader but have gotten myself in trouble by not staying aware of where I've waded too, and finding that I have to go back the way I came in and that against the current I'm worn out before I'm safely dry. Now at 71 I've had parkinsons which makes me somewhat unstable and have been sick a couple of times in the last few years, which makes me too weak to climb a stream bank. Now again I have to work my strength back up to the point that I can make it to the stream and wade a little too. For the last several years I have had to carry a wading staff and then bought one of the sospenders inflatable life vests, which I wear under my waders any time I'm near the water. My wading staff is wooden and has a spike end and a strap to my wading belt. and when I let go it floats downstream so it's out of my way but still in reach. If I couldn't do this I may have to stop fishing and what good would that be. tight lines! Bob:)
     
  13. a.schweitzer

    a.schweitzer Tigre de Princeton

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    Well ladies (at least one posted) and gents, I think this post has taken many interesting directions. I didn't realize some of the machismo that wading skills apparently reflect.

    I interpret confident/strong wading skills as dependent on the run. I was recently fishing on the snake and watched anglers ahead of me wade right into the water I hook steelhead in. Just because you can wade it doesn't mean it will confer a fishing advantage. I am still relatively new to steelheading but that is what I like to observe. Good anglers IMO, wade sparingly (only deep enough to reach the fish and/or execute a cast). And yes, I have fished runs where I was up to my teats to reach fish, but it has its place.
     
  14. Rimmy

    Rimmy Member

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    Wading skills ? It's luck and it will come to bite you. Just ask the guy who lost his life on the sandy with his 16 year old son last weekend. DO NOT GO IN THE RIVER WITH OUT C02 vest.
     
  15. LG Mix

    LG Mix New Member

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    I believe a good wader avoids mine fields, quicksand and other people's toes.
     
  16. Panhandle

    Panhandle Active Member

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    It's luck? Are you telling me that at any given time I could drown and I have no control over it, so I better wear a life vest? That's a pretty ignorant statement.
     

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