Thoughts/Opinions on a multi-head shooter for a Redinton CPX 7wt Switch.

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Jordan Simpson, Jun 5, 2011.

  1. ten80 Active Member

    Posts: 516
    Anchorage, AK
    Ratings: +84 / 0
    sorry, double posted.
  2. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    No worries to everyone- I'm only focusing on the positive side of things here (being a member of about six different message boards sorta trains you for it...).

    The Tenkara video I was talking about I found while researching that style of fishing- we did a bit of it in Hawai'i in the canals for baby barracuda- total blast!

    As for line selection/set up, I think I will go with a mono running line and then slowly build up a variet of heads. This, as far as I can tell, will be the least costly for me.
  3. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,530
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Ratings: +1,503 / 9
    Good luck with that magic trick. I'm up for trying. I don't live on the prime pink side of the Puget Sound but I know a few places that they have been known to pass by.
  4. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    So I went in to my fly shop and was looking t the different line set ups that you guys had all suggested. I was looking at the Rio mono running line and had this question- can you strip it safely or is it going to nest up t your feet? It looked cool but I was concerned about the tangle factor. I was also looking at the Rio Outbound Short in either the clear intermediate shooting head, or maybe going full floater and then use a poly if I needed to. I am leaning more towards the Rio OB Short because it is integrated...thoughts?
  5. constructeur Active Member

    Posts: 1,520
    Seattle, Wa
    Ratings: +412 / 0
    I think you're over thinking this man. I bet the Rio mono line you were looking at was the slickshooter right? I use it because it's cheap and durable and shoots very well. It comes in either a 35lb or 50lb and I personally use the 50lb as it's easier to hold onto. As with any mono line you/ll need to stretch it out once in a while, but that is as easy as tying your shoes.

    The only thing to keep in mind is that mono running lines don't really mend for shit in the river.

    In regards to those shooting heads, talk your shop into letting you test cast them, to find a length and taper that you dig, if possible.

    In regards to sinking line, unless your beach has a 10' plus deep hole that youre trying to dredge through, a floating line will work a treat. You can always tie a pattern with extra weight, or again have your shop make you a short tip out of T-14 (Should cost you around .60-.80 cents a foot U.S. plus an assembly fee, all tips I've had made were less than $10 each)
  6. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    I'll be really only fly fishing the beaches for coho, so mending isn't too much of a factor- where I fish it's usually just casting and stripping.
    I was thinking of a floating head more, because I could always tie a weighted pattern, or use a sinking poly leader or T-14 tip.
    I just wasn't too sure what the mono is like for stripping in, or how it feels when hauling during a cast...
  7. shotgunner Anywhere ~ Anytime

    Posts: 488
    45th Parallel NW Michigan
    Ratings: +23 / 1
    Which line was your primary with the single hander? Might be the direction to lean.

    I like the integrated heads, allows longer retrieves without incoming or outgoing interference. Outbound, Outbound Short, or Airflo 40+ in float/15' intermediate tip or straight intermediate will cover 85%+ beach casting. Add 5' - 10' sinking poly for troughs. The intermediates drop below breakers rolling in.. something a floater lacks and can be bossed by them.

    Later in the game pick up one spare spool and load it with whatever satellite line tickles your fancy.

    Just my personal prefs.. others mileage may vary. Best of luck.

    B
  8. Brazda Fly Fishing guide "The Bogy House" Lodge

    Posts: 428
    Ellensburg, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Nuts on in my opinion.
    These types of rods may say switch but you still need to decide if you are overhand casting or spey casting to choose line and have it perform the task. Being you are salt fishing probably overhand, correct?
    I run the outbounds on switch rods when I want them to perform like a single hand rod. They will handle light tips good enough too. That rod will do well with a 425 grain.

    My question to you is why the switch if your salt fishing, extra distance? because accuracy will be less the longer you go. If its just for distance then go with the shooting head style just be sure its around 425 grains.
  9. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    I am hoping to find a line that can overhead as well as swtich. Fine line, i know, but if one exists, thats what I'm hoping for. I usually overhead, but with weighted flies, wind and what not, I'd prefer to not get hit in the head with a clouser, as well, the beach I fish with sometimes gets a bit of foot traffic and I'd like to be able to still make long casts without having to have that length flying behind me where people might be walking- hence the reason I'm hoping to learn how to switch.

    I just contacted my guy in Hawai'i who lent me his set up out there, and it was a Beulah 8/9, matched with the Beulach Elixir. Probably not transferable to our westcoast...
  10. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,530
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Ratings: +1,503 / 9
    I have an Elixir switch line for one of my switch rods. It does two handed nicely with delicate (for me) presentation and overheads okay. I prefer the airflo 40+ for two handed overhead work off the beach, and this line also does two handed casting well. You have options, you just need to get a few together, loaners perhaps, and try them out. For me personally, and this is just me because I'm not very talented, I like to be at the lower third of the grain window for two handed overhead work, middle third for scandi type two handed casting and upper third for skagit delivery methods.
  11. MDL We work to become, not to acquire.

    Posts: 227
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Jordan,
    I am planing on selling my CPX 1137-4 as soon as I get it onto classifieds. I used it last summer with silvers, chum and it performed great. I use a 8wt ambush, 330grain scandi with polyleaders and it overhead cast great. I originally lined it with 420 grain scandi and 9wt ambush but I tend to like the lighter side. Spey/Switch casting from the beach really helps with blown shoulders and getting the line out with one backcast. I have been using mostly spey rods for all fishing (except for the Fiberhammer that I will be using for silvers). The rod is pretty much new as it was replaced through warranty at end of season(didn't wax ferrules=snap)comes with a spare tip. Send me a PM if interested.
    Mike
  12. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    Thanks Mike, but I've already got my hands on one. With your said set up, the 8wt Ambush Scandi, did you do more overhead casting with it than spey/switch casting? I am wanting to learn how to spey/switch cast so I can still punch out long casts without having to worry about foot traffic that can sometimes be an issue behind me on this particular beach. The fact it's easier on the body is also a driving factor. I'll probs be doing a bit of both types of casting, but am hoping to learn swtich really fast.
  13. MDL We work to become, not to acquire.

    Posts: 227
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Jordan,
    I meant that I used an 8wt, 9wt ambush and corresponding airflo scandi lines. SA has a nice mono running line that I used but I had one that came with a twist which was a rats nest pain so I just used 30lb airflo ridge running line. What I like with the ambush lines is that they are only 20 ft long and have a profile similiar to a skagit. You can strip most of the line in as with beach fishing and get it out pretty quickly. I also used 10ft poly leaders with 4-6ft of tippet. The lighter lines don't load as deep as say the 420grain lines and will load about half way and will tip cast more. I was mostly 50/50 with overhead and spey casts. I thought of it as a fast rod with decent recovery and can do various tasks. It will also throw intermediate to fast sink leaders or T8. I haven't thrown anything heavier and mostly use poly leaders. Definately play with different lines and see what works for you. It handled silvers and chum just fine. Good luck as i am sure you will get it dialed in. Almost forgot...I used the lighter line 330 grain plus 30 grains for the poly leader to give 360 grains for overhead casting. I felt the 420 plus poly overhead casting was a bit much but that was me.....
    Tight Lines!!!
  14. Switch MT New Member

    Posts: 43
    Billings MT
    Ratings: +3 / 0
  15. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    After watching some spey and switch casting videos, I think that this rod is going to used for that style of casting. If I want to over-head, I will just use my 8wt TFO single hand. I am going to revert back to the original reasons I wanted this rod- to switch and spey cast, and to ease up on arm strain.
    This being said, what line would one recommend for this style of casting in the salt, for distance?

    I will probs switch my WFF line on my 8wt TFO single-hand to a Rio Outbound shooter for the single-hand distance, but for switch distance, does anyone have any ideas?
  16. ten80 Active Member

    Posts: 516
    Anchorage, AK
    Ratings: +84 / 0
    I suggest you throw on the 8wt line from your TFO single hander and give overhead casting a go before you nix the idea. The 7wt Redington switch is very light and I had no trouble with two- or single-handed overhead casts. Get a feel for the rod, then make a decision about what lines to use.
  17. snbrundage Member

    Posts: 111
    seattle, wa
    Ratings: +3 / 0
    Thank you ten80. For as much time that I spend thinking about these things, it is shocking how little I think well. I will do exactly what you suggest, and maybe some other things too, with my CPX 7wt. Switch. I already have floating shooting heads from 210 to 350gr. and a 325 gr. Skagit Short. As I said earlier, I can single hand the rod all day with the 425gr. Skagit Short, and 90 ft. or so is no problem, but it is too heavy to be fun after noon. The pole is truly light and fast. Now I'm as enthused as the day I bought the rod.

    Thank you again.

    steve
  18. shotgunner Anywhere ~ Anytime

    Posts: 488
    45th Parallel NW Michigan
    Ratings: +23 / 1
    Point taken re foot traffic, good to be safe. The right line will perform well at both, 40+ is such a line, pretty much a Skandinavian taper. In my opinion the Ambush is to short headed for casting long. I've used some and liked them for close quarters on streams. A few of these lower stream areas have places I can cast from the bank which I do when possible to avoid alerting fish [stirring silt] With overhead, it takes a very short - power finicky stroke to maximise. Longer rods by default lend themselves to longer strokes.

    The plus side is that an Ambush will turnover A LOT. A 10' - 15' poly might help tame it.. O.K, I just reviewed MDL's #33 post and echo his thoughts on the Ambush. I'd suspect that the right 12' - 15' floating tip from lighter multi-tip line kit could work on one.

    At any rate, best of luck..

    B