Trail cameras

Discussion in 'Cast & Blast' started by Roper, Aug 6, 2011.

  1. Roper

    Roper Idiot Savant

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    Ribka's post of his deer and yotes got me thinking about a trail camera again. I have a little extra stash sitting around and would like to set one up at the property.

    I'm gonna be lazy, not do any google searches and just ask for advice about price, quality, etc.

    Lay it on me bro's...:clown:
     
  2. andrew

    andrew Active Member

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    Roper,

    The old saying "you get what you pay for" applies - more MP gives you better pictures etc.

    BTW - I think on the "other" (Hunting-Washington) forum somebody has a mess of them for sale. My apologies in advance if I just broke a rule about advertising another forum :hmmm:

    Andrew
     
  3. Roper

    Roper Idiot Savant

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    Thanks...I don't think Chris will mind...
     
  4. ral

    ral Rich Layendecker

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    I have owned one trail camera and set it up on the deck and discovered I had 3 different bears visiting during the night. One at 10:30, one at 2 and another at 3:30 as regular as a bus. Plus coyotes, deer, 'coons, bobcat etc. It was a hoot to check the camera every day.

    What I learned about cameras is they can really eat batteries. My advice is to get one that allows you to use an external 12v car battery.
     
  5. cuponoodle breakfast

    cuponoodle breakfast Active Member

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    My dad and I have three different cams. Two are cheap Moultries and the other is a nicer Cuddeback. The Cuddeback gets much better pictures and more of them. The Moultries work ok. They just work like cheap cameras. They take a little more movement to trigger, are a bit slower, and the pics aren't nearly as good as the Cuddeback. One of the Moultries can be a bitch sometimes about accepting a memory card, requiring several attempts at inserting the card before it recognizes it. We also found that the flash on the Moultries is too much and whites out the pictures. Annoying at first, but a little tape blocking part of the flash solves that.

    The Cuddeback takes 4 D batteries. The Moultries take lantern batteries. We leave them out for a month at a time and both brands still have juice left. With the Moultrie's slower trigger and different location it gets about 1/4 as many pictures as the Cuddeback. I'm not sure the Moultrie's battery would hold up as well if it was taking as many pics as the Cuddeback.

    We enjoyed the Moultries for several years before getting the Cuddeback. They still accomplish the task of letting you know what's in the area. We don't need 3 cams out all the time so one of the Moultries stays home most of the time now. It just depends on what you want to spend. When I ordered the Cuddeback I also ordered the protective box for it. Bears are curious and will mess with your camera.
     
  6. UptheCreek

    UptheCreek Member

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    Haven't been in this section of the forum in awhile. I would really look into the Bushnell trail cams. The best one out there for the money. Easy to use and takes good pics and videos. My dad and I currently use 3 of them.