Trying not to drown in all the digital SLR inofrmation on the web: Lifelines welcome.

Discussion in 'Photography / Video' started by Grant Richie, Nov 9, 2010.

  1. Grant Richie

    Grant Richie Member

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    I have been reading countless hours about digital SLR's on the internet over the past several weeks. I often feel like shooting myself in the head and putting myself out of misery. I have made up my mind and changed it countless times.

    Here is what I am leaning towards now; a pentax k-7. One of the main selling points for me is the "weather sealing." If I buy an SLR I plan on using it, which means 2-3 days a week on the river, in the mountains, going up and down trails, etc. Does anyone have any experience with these?

    This will be my first SLR camera. I was wanting to get the pentax k-r or k-x since they are a little more begginer oriented, but they do not seem to be weather proofed like the k-7.

    After the camera question, if you are a SLR packing fisherman/backpacker, which lenses do you find meet your needs best for the photography your doing and the need for somewhat lightweight equipment? I am considering fixed focal length lenses and that is why I asked the last question.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. tkww

    tkww Member

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    Trying not to drown in all the digital SLR inofrmation on the web: Lifelines welc

    -
     
  3. veilside180sx

    veilside180sx Member

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    Trying not to drown in all the digital SLR inofrmation on the web: Lifelines welc

    My take is...hike with a good point and shoot. Rafting, camping, general fishing...take the DSLR.

    There is a need to have both unfortunately, as they both have their place.

    I shoot a Canon XSi with a 50mm/1.8 or 55-250 and my p/s is a Canon SD780IS that takes fabulous pictures of still objects (or relatively slow moving)

    The water pictures and stuff are all taken on the DSLR, but pics of fish are typically on the p/s.
     
  4. JesseC

    JesseC Active Member

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    Trying not to drown in all the digital SLR inofrmation on the web: Lifelines welc

    Get a good body and lens if you're going to get into the SLR game. Go with either Canon or Nikon.

    For me - I chose the Nikon D90. I think there's a new model the 7000 which just came out. Yes, it's a pricey camera, but you pay for quality. The great thing about getting a good camera in the beginning is that you won't be kicking yourself 6 months down the road when you decide you want a new lens or the professional features of a pro model.

    Grab a cheaper D90 or 7000 - you won't be disappointed.
     
  5. KerryS

    KerryS Ignored Member

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    The Nikon D7000 is a considerable improvement over the D90 and even rivals the D300 in some aspects. If one was looking at the 90 but can afford the extra bucks for the 7000, they should buy the 7000.
     
  6. Grant Richie

    Grant Richie Member

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    Trying not to drown in all the digital SLR inofrmation on the web: Lifelines welc

    Thanks for all the input. I do have a waterproof point-and-shoot and use it quite a bit. It never does it for lanscape though and it seems whenever I run into a bear, no matter how close I am, it looks far away in the picture and I have been pretty close to some bears. What I was really hoping was that the weather sealing might make the camera survive a possible dunk in the river. I just don't want to spend a bunch of money on a camera and then always be too scared to use it for fear of damaging it.

    I really appreciate the feedback on lenses as well. I was leaning towards buying the camera body only and then buying a higher end lens. But perhaps I will start out with the less expensive kit lens and see where I use it most and then pursue a higher quality lens after getting my feet wet.
     
  7. veilside180sx

    veilside180sx Member

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    Even with "weather sealing", I wouldn't expect any of them to live through a dunk. It may live through some rain, but not a dunk imo.
     
  8. Grant Richie

    Grant Richie Member

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    Trying not to drown in all the digital SLR inofrmation on the web: Lifelines welc

    For you guys that have used your Digital SLR's a bit, would it be a bad idea to buy one focal length lens that I would keep on the camera while hiking and fishing and then carry a telephoto lens for those distant wildlife shots? The primary lens idea is again thinking about minimizing weight hanging off my neck. I don't mind carrying weight in a pack (extra lens or lenses) but too much weight hung around the neck definitely leads to some tight muscles here and there. If that sounds reasonable what would be your pick for a primary lens? I would primarily be taking landscape pictures, although when someone will go with me, I definitely like to get fish pictures as well and will try and get some fish pictures by myself.
     
  9. KerryS

    KerryS Ignored Member

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    You can buy sling packs that allow quick access to your camera while providing a confortable way to carry it while hiking. Changing lenses isn't as easy in the field as it may seem. At least not for me. I am real careful with my lenses and my camera body and I don't like to change the lens that often. A lot of things can go wrong. I use an 18-200mm lens as a walk around. I lose a little in sharpness for the range of the lens but its versatility gives me instant access to a lot of shots. I try to plan my field trips for what I want to shoot. If I am heading out to shoot Blue Herons I will attach a 500mm before I leave the house. If I am shooting sunrises or sunsets a 12-24mm or the 10mm is attached. I still carry other lenses with me and change if I see something good that requires a different lens but normally I try to follow a plan.
     
  10. crc333

    crc333 New Member

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    richiegd

    IMO...As a full time professional photog covering motorsports acrrss the US. I get the wonderful opportunity to shoot in many different conditions, from sleet, cold to very hot and in equally high humidity (Daytona in July) oh and the rain, the wonderful rain. I stood in it for 45 minutes prior to the start of the 24hrs of Daytona back in January.

    I think Its very important to use gear that can handle the abuse that you plan on giving it. The body should be a magnesium or some sort of blended material mix I think TKWW makes a good point about weather sealed bodies. Right now in the market they start somewhere in the $1700 range and go up to 8k. In the 5 to 8k range you get bodies that can handle heat, cold, humidity and rain...not a down poor unprotected not a sand storm, but can handle being used for the moments that a fully sealed body can handle. I'm not saying people haven't found a way to test the weather proof-ness of pro bodies, I've heard of some unusual situations.

    As for protecting the camera/lens. There isn't a Pro out there that doesn't have rain gear for their camera gear, and then this rain-gear is only good for a few hours in continues rain for up to 4 or 5 hours. At some point your camera will get wet! You'll also need to consider how you'll carry the body and two lenses along with your fishing gear!

    On the lens side of things do your best to get the best glass you can afford. I recommend staying away from the "Do-all" kind of lenses you'll find that at some point they don't do it all or not well enough. The slowest fixed focal length lenses I would tell you to consider would be f4. I find that I can still shoot with an F4 lens in most conditions even low light and indoors. I know that the ISO settings in most pro-level bodies can be turned up 25,000 and higher but is that really what you need?!

    I shoot Nikon D300s's and have lenses specific to my work so what I use may or may not be good for what your needs are. As for purchasing, it doesn't matter if its new, refurb'd, or pre-owned get the best you can get from a reputable store, local or online.

    If you plan on hiking and shooting wildlife or scenic get yourself a tripod and get Carbon Fiber. They're light weight and if you carry it, it won't take heat out of your skin like an aluminum or steel legged tripod will.

    If you want to talk more in-depth PM me and we can talk on the phone.

    Cheers,
    Curtis
     
  11. Jon Bial

    Jon Bial Chasing the Magic

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    Trying not to drown in all the digital SLR inofrmation on the web: Lifelines welc

    www.kenrockwell.com

    He does a fantastic job of reviewing cameras, and all of his reviews are of equipment that he bought or borrowed so he is as independent as they come.
     
  12. Dustin Bise

    Dustin Bise Active Member

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    id get a d7000, 17-55 vr, and a 70-200 vr. add in a 60mm 2.8 micro for workin up close.

    if only i was rich, then i would add in some darn sb-900's
     
  13. JesseC

    JesseC Active Member

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    look at the specs between the d90 and the d7000. can you spot the MEGA differences? Unless you're planning on shooting a lot of video, pick up a used d90 on the cheap.

    if you have a ton of cash to blow - grab the d7000.

    Let me summarize ALL of the above advice though; Get a nikon, get a good camera the first time, get a lens with a little range on it for your first piece of glass. (not a prime lens)
     
  14. KerryS

    KerryS Ignored Member

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    16.2mp cmos sensor, all new 39 point af system, new metering system, af tracking is new, magnesium body, full hd movie, and the list goes on. In reality the d7000 can't be compared to the 90.
     
  15. Grant Richie

    Grant Richie Member

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    I am looking at the D7000 and frankly it looks great. It is a little bigger than the Pentax, but that's OK. Looking at the lenses they don't offer very many lenses with image stabilization. How important have others found this feature? Without image stabilization, do you need to shoot from a tripod to get good results?
     
  16. Dustin Bise

    Dustin Bise Active Member

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    depends on the lighting and the picture. if ur shutter speed is less then the focal length of ur lense u should shoot it on a tripod. image stabilization is good, but not the end all.

    and as far as the d7000 vs d90, i think the 7000 would take it hands down. who doesnt want to shoot alot of hd video...
     
  17. surfnfish

    surfnfish Member

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    couldn't agree more - real world camera tests/use, with great feedback...check out his review in recommended cameras of the very affordable Nikon D5000
     
  18. SteelieD

    SteelieD Non Member

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    I am a Nikon guy too and really don't think you can go wrong with any of the bodies mentioned (D90, D5000 or D7000). If I had an unlimited budget, I go with the 7000. In reality, I am likely to upgrade to the 90 sometime soon. Like all technology, these bodies will be "outdated" sooner rather than later.

    I think the most important thing to consider is the glass. Camera bodies are replaceable and upgradeable, if you invest in good lenses up front, you can bring them along for years... Oh yeah, VR is pretty cool.
     

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