Tying equipment

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by nquizitive, Aug 11, 2008.

  1. nquizitive

    nquizitive New Member

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    I am wanting to get into fly tying. I would like to start with used equipment and get better if it works out. I'm looking for a vise, hackle clamp, scissors, and a bobbin. I watched the videos of the Mitches bobbin whirler. E-mail if you have some around you no longer use or if you know a good source. rv_tripper@hotmail.com
    Thanks
    Dave
     
  2. moobiker

    moobiker Moobiker

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    Dave,
    Good for you to jump in. I thinks it's a good idea to get good used equipment to see if you like it, but poor equipment is likely to keep you from getting better. The video's are a great way to get a visual explanation for terms that don't initially make sense in books, but the best way to get a feel for it is to take a class. Most flyshops offer classes at various times during the year, and generally the equipment they have for learning, while not superior, is good enough so that you can tie decent flies and not be frustrated by your equipment.
    All that being said, if you're like me, you just want to get your hands on something and get started. To that end, Cabela's makes a couple of tool kits, with a vise, bobbin, bodkin, hackle pliers, and even a whip finisher (the one in mine was a thompson and useless, get a matarelli) that are marketed essentially as portable kits, for $25 and $40 respectively, depending on how many tools you want. The vise in the one I have, and only occasionally use, isn't as good as my Thompson, but it'll hold an 18 on up to a 2 without any problem.
    The biggest expense long term isn't likely to be tools but materials. Decent quality hackle, dubbing can really add up. My suggestion there is decide what you want to tie (IMO it's a good idea to start with nymphs), and get the best materials you an afford to tie those flies, then move on to more complicated patterns.

    Most of all, have fun with it - it's a very exciting moment when you start catching fish on flies that you tied yourself.

    Cheers,
    Mike
     

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