Tying Fies and back pain

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by Chef, Mar 8, 2011.

  1. Chef New Member

    Posts: 1,102
    Seattle, WA
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    I have only been tying for a short time but when I tie, my back starts to kill me.... and this is after like 3 or 4 flies. I have played with different chairs and height of the chairs but no luck.

    Anyone have this problem before?
  2. Philster New Member

    Posts: 2,479
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    But I bet you haven't played with different vise heights. Jay Murakoshi showed the way back in the 90's for commercial tying. Sit in a comfortable chair for you with good posture. Open your legs to a 90 degree angle. Let your arms rest on your thighs. See where your hands are? That's the area your vise should be in. Bend your wrists up as far as they will go, and down as far as they will go without moving the arms, and put your vise in the middle of that range. Takes some getting used to, but it'll let you go hours.
  3. fishingcheftim Member

    Posts: 207
    Seattle, Wa
    Ratings: +10 / 0
    As you are chef and used to standing on your feet and using your knife at a certain distance, the change of hand position and body position will put a huge pain in your back. For me I had to find a chair height that fit, more then a specific chair. I discovered I had to be a bit further away then I wanted.
  4. jeff bandy Make my day

    Posts: 2,230
    Edmonds, Wa.
    Ratings: +275 / 1
    Chef, do a search. This topic has come up before. I find the lower and closer I can hold my hands when tying, the better. Take a break after each fly. Get up and move around. As for your chair, try putting a pillow behind your lower back and slide back into it.

    This is your first step to getting old. Remember it well. It's all down hill from here.:rofl:
  5. Chef New Member

    Posts: 1,102
    Seattle, WA
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    Thanks everyone. I will play around with the vice height as well.
  6. Camo Clad Warrior Member

    Posts: 341
    Sedro-Woolley,WA
    Ratings: +10 / 0
    You might look at getting a table in which you can stand behind?

    Or just drink more beer while tying ;)
  7. Loren Jensen Active Member

    Posts: 1,013
    Sedro-Woolley, Washington
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    i am also starting to feel some back pain after a few flies. i am gonna try the commercial tyer sitting style lol
  8. Josh Smestad aka Mtnwkr

    Posts: 620
    Bremerton, Wa
    Ratings: +67 / 0
    Same problem here. More beer helps, but as the back pain eases, the flies get worse. I'll try adjusting some things.
  9. Philster New Member

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    Lol all you want. Would that be LOLAYW? But try going from 7:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. using your neck, upper back and shoulders to support your arms after a full days work. There was some scandahoovian pro-tyer chick who used to do braided flies, and she suspended bungees with slings from the ceiling to support her arms in a fake "zero G" situation to take the stress off her upper back. Anything to keep going.
  10. Mark Walker Active Member

    Posts: 2,760
    So. Cal.
    Ratings: +221 / 1
    Get a comfortable chair, a good light, a better magnifying glass, two Vicodin and a double shot of good vodka. Tie only saltwater flies.:rofl:
  11. Loren Jensen Active Member

    Posts: 1,013
    Sedro-Woolley, Washington
    Ratings: +1 / 0

    damn that's a little far haha. i just tied an intruder. pissed me off and hurt my neck lol
    maybe that's where the crazy charlie came from?
  12. scottflycst Active Member

    Posts: 1,711
    Ozark Mtn springwater
    Ratings: +24 / 0
    Posture and vise height make a huge difference as others have stated. Do whatever it takes to prevent hunching over your work or creating tight muscles. To help watch yourself in action a side mirror is invaluable.
  13. Mike Wilson Yakbowbw

    Posts: 660
    Everett, WA
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    I am recovering from a neck fusion C6-C7. I have my chair all the way up and it feels like I need to be just a little bit higher. I take breaks and don't tie more that three or four at a time before I take a break.
  14. jeff bandy Make my day

    Posts: 2,230
    Edmonds, Wa.
    Ratings: +275 / 1
    I think I've heard of a sex toy like this. I heard:rofl:
  15. scottflycst Active Member

    Posts: 1,711
    Ozark Mtn springwater
    Ratings: +24 / 0
    Jeff, that's a different kind of tying!
  16. Plecoptera Active Member

    Posts: 622
    Bellingham
    Ratings: +28 / 0
    Sitting down is not good for your back. I would seriously look into getting a standing desk. I've converted all my desks to standing height (including my desk at work) and it helps out tremendously. Some of the architect style desks are build at standing height stock and won't require modification. Except my float tube, I've even set up my boats to stand in while fishing.
  17. Loren Jensen Active Member

    Posts: 1,013
    Sedro-Woolley, Washington
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    I remember when I had my retail job how crappy it was not to have a place to sit. After a while, I could stand for the longest time with little fatigue.
  18. Rob Ast Active Member

    Posts: 1,899
    West Pugetopolis WA
    Ratings: +229 / 3
    I agree. I have a counter height desk with a stool on wheels. I will alternate between standing and sitting, and the only thing I have to do is stand a slide the stool out of the way.
  19. Jeff Dodd Active Member

    Posts: 1,569
    Langley, WA
    Ratings: +349 / 0
    Chef - What part of your back hurts? Low, middle or upper?
    Some tips to consider:

    Placing the vise low so your arms and shoulders are in a neutral position is good, but can encourage stooping over your vise if you do not have proper magnification.
    Changing posture is always good for circulation - short standing/stretching breaks is best
    Proper chair size is important. Lumber curve in right spot, seat pan depth adequate (not touching the back of the knee) and hips/butt slightly higher thatn the knee for proper chair heigth

    I use viser magnifier and the focus range is around 8 inches. I often bring my vise up to chin level and tie at that heigth. The Nor-Vise and auto bobbin allow the tyer to keep his hands/arms in a more neutral position, as you rarely have to wrap materials around the shank.

    Take care Isaak!
    Jeff
  20. Chef New Member

    Posts: 1,102
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Jeff:

    It is my upper back. I will need to change some things around. Perhaps starting with vise height and then play around with the chair thing. Perhaps standing might be to the best bet. Just gotta do some big modifications for that since I now use a roll top desk. I would like to keep the roll top of the desk if posssible becasue my of cats. So I was thinking of making a table thats high enough and then cutting the roll top off on the sides so I can put the roll top section on top of the taller desk. I know it might sound weird but I love the feature of the roll top desk.