Tying Streamside

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by Trapper Badovinac, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. Trapper Badovinac Author, Writer, Photographer

    Posts: 446
    Helena, Montana
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    A friend and I made this video a few years ago. I thought maybe folks here might enjoy it.

    dfl, Freestone and GAT like this.
  2. wyofly Active Member

    Posts: 181
    NW Wyoming
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    I never leave home without my fly and leader tying material and tools. ll fits in a small pkg that I keep in my vest.
  3. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 4,009
    Willamette Valley, OR
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    Well, that is flat out cool! So, who's the old dude with the white beard and hair?:D

    Thanks for posting. I tie flies at picnic tables while fishing stillwaters, but never tried tying flies while fishing a river. As noted, there is an advantage to that tact. (BTW, glad you made it over here, my friend)
  4. David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

    Posts: 1,909
    Walla Walla, WA
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    That's a cool vid. I would have left a bit of thread to rib the emerger (actually, I would probably have used brass wire), but in any event he's (you?) got me thinking about a portable kit when I camp and fish.
  5. Trapper Badovinac Author, Writer, Photographer

    Posts: 446
    Helena, Montana
    Ratings: +590 / 0
    I dye my hair that color to make myself look older . . .
    GAT and David Dalan like this.
  6. Jeff Dodd Active Member

    Posts: 1,576
    Langley, WA
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    Trapper
    Thanks for posting, great video - I picked up all sorts of ideas from watching it.

    That stream you were fishing looks like paradise to me right now while I am sitting here on an island in the wet dark months :)
  7. Jeff Peacock Member

    Posts: 77
    port orchard, wa
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    Great work Trapper- nice post.
  8. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 4,009
    Willamette Valley, OR
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    Odd... I do the same thing! :)
  9. Trapper Badovinac Author, Writer, Photographer

    Posts: 446
    Helena, Montana
    Ratings: +590 / 0
    I normally rib that soft hackle fly. My friend is the video guy and everything was done in short choppy segments then edited together. I left out that rib in the process, but good point. Thanks.

    I've taken that kit with me to many places. It's really worked out great to be able to customize some patterns based what you find in the river. It's especially helpful if you're fishing water that is new to you. That wasn't the case in this video though. That's the Arkansas River I'm fishing and I've fished that since I was a kid although I no longer live in Colorado.
  10. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 4,009
    Willamette Valley, OR
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    There is certainly an advantage to tying when fishing. A few years ago, Gin and I were fishing East Lake and while she was on the lake, I was tying flies at a picnic table... with the aid of a chipmunk that was very interested in my trail mix.

    Callibaetis were hatching and I noticed the emergers where not really a solid grey color but had a light green tint. I found some dubbing that was basically a very light olive, tied some simple patterns and gave them a try. They worked great!

    Now, I tie my Callibaetis with dubbing that includes a light olive hue. I wouldn't have figured that one out if I hadn't tied the flies at the lake and tried them just after tying them. Of course, the color recommendation from the chipmunk didn't hurt :)

    Great thread!
  11. David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

    Posts: 1,909
    Walla Walla, WA
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    Where do you get the screen fro seining the river, did you make it?
  12. Trapper Badovinac Author, Writer, Photographer

    Posts: 446
    Helena, Montana
    Ratings: +590 / 0
    I did make it and it's very easy:

    I took two 4 foot long 1" dowels. I then stapled common 3' wide window screen to the dowels leaving 6" at both the top and bottom. That 6" at the top gives you a hand hold. That 6" at the bottom gives you something to dig with and also keeps the screen from getting trashed.

    Normally, when I sample a river with that seine, I first hold it in the current for a couple of minutes and then inspect it. This is before I start flipping over rocks. That way I'll see what's in the drift first and on the substrate second. I look for the various orders, families, genus, and species, but I also stand back and see what insect is present in the highest concentration and at what stage. That will determine what I tie on first and how I fish it.
  13. GAT Active Member

    Posts: 4,009
    Willamette Valley, OR
    Ratings: +2,592 / 0
    Rocky, our bug guy, and I also made nets as Trapper described. At one time, Rocky would bring an aquarium to the local club flyfishing fair and we'd go to Oak Creek and collect nymphs so he could show them in the aquarium at the fair. It helped to have one guy upstream shuffling their feet on the bottom to dislodge the nymphs so they'd float into the net held downstream.

    This technique is how I gathered nymphs for my bug aquarium that I once kept in my garage.

    Turns out, Oak Creek is home to a huge variety of aquatic insects and the reason some entomologists moved to Corvallis to teach at OSU. Evidently, the number of bug species available is rare for one little stream. When Hafele and Hughes wrote their first book, they collected bugs from Oak Creek to use for reference in the book.

    Unfortunately, once I switched from rivers to stillwaters, I've found it damned difficult to collect bugs off the bottom of the lakes :)