Tying with "Chick-a-bou"

Discussion in 'Patterns' started by SuperDave, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. SuperDave New Member

    Posts: 341
    .Spanaway, WA
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    Whiting offers a soft-hackle pelt with "Chick-a-bou". It ties up some great patterns such as the "Tabou Caddis Emerger" as featured on the Global Fly Fisher site. http://globalflyfisher,com/patterns/taboucaddis/ I've tied several dozen example for use next spring/summer and they look absolutely DEADLY!

    Check it out! :thumb:

    SuperDave
  2. Sourdoughs -Marc Chapman, icthyoantagonist

    Posts: 577
    WA
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  3. SuperDave New Member

    Posts: 341
    .Spanaway, WA
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    My "bad". I corrected it.

    SD
  4. Nick Riggs I've been known to fish from time to time...

    Posts: 481
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    That fly is amazing. Thanks!
  5. ceviche Active Member

    Posts: 2,261
    Shoreline, Washington, U.S.A.
    Ratings: +24 / 0
    Cool set of techniques for tying a fly. The method utilized for making the body results in what Les Johnson refers to (and Preston Singletary described in the "Recommend 2 gotta have soft hackles" thread) as "Self-bodied"--as in the "Self-Bodied Carey." First securing the tail of the fly (the feather tip), twisting the feather, and then wrapping the body with the same feather is the essence of the technique. Same as with the Carey, the body needs reinforcement with some kind of ribbing material.

    Anyone know of other patterns (other than the pheasant tail nymph) that use the same body-forming technique?
  6. Richard Olmstead BigDog

    Posts: 2,417
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +684 / 0
    Hans Weilenmann's "CDC and Elk." It is a simple and effective fly. Tie in a CDC feather by the tip at the back of the hook shank and wind forward to form the body. Then tie in a regular elk hair wing and your done. The CDC barbs provide floatation and imitate legs at the same time.
  7. Craig Hardt aka Nagasaurus

    Posts: 193
    Lynnwood, WA
    Ratings: +60 / 0
    Nice pattern...I might have to try it with the similar filoplume feathers on a pheasant skin.

    To add to the self-bodied list there the classic damselfly pattern using marabou that are easy to tie.