Walking Trails with a Rod in Hand

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Gregg Lundgren, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. Gregg Lundgren Now fishing on weekdays too!

    Posts: 513
    N. Edmonds / Mukilteo, WA
    Ratings: +89 / 0
    This probably wouldn't include real bushwhacking, but here is something I use to keep a broken-down rod from snagging the brush. Like many folks, I like to carry my 4 pc strung-up and broken down into 2 pieces so I am ready for action. I used to grab the two sections and go. Occasionally, the line, leader or misaligned rod tip would catch on a bush or a vine.

    My solution was to use 2 pieces of two sided 1/2inch Velcro and wrap it around the two sections, line, and leader. It trims down the profile, and I don't have to keep re-gripping the two pieces to keep them in alignment. It takes mere seconds.

    Anyway, someone has probably thought of this already, but it has saved me some grief, so I thought I would share. I thought of this when I was "tying" my tomato plants to their stakes. My Redington Torrent is green, so the green Velcro strips for tomatoes is a good match.:rolleyes:
    Jeff Dodd likes this.
  2. Evan Virnoche Guest

    Posts: 0
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Slide the reel case over both and go
  3. Gregg Lundgren Now fishing on weekdays too!

    Posts: 513
    N. Edmonds / Mukilteo, WA
    Ratings: +89 / 0
    That works good for an easy jaunt, but only solves part of the problem. I used to do that, but stopped packing in reel cases on longer hike-ins, as it is just one more thing to carry in and keep track of/stow.
  4. David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

    Posts: 1,910
    Walla Walla, WA
    Ratings: +740 / 0
    13' fully assembled and crawling through bushes. I'm pro :)

    Seriously though, one long skinny thing seems easier to manage than two skinny things.
    Kyle Smith likes this.
  5. Gregg Lundgren Now fishing on weekdays too!

    Posts: 513
    N. Edmonds / Mukilteo, WA
    Ratings: +89 / 0
    Try doing that hiking a half mile through wet-side underbrush that is constantly trying to overtake the trail.;)
  6. Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

    Posts: 7,136
    Not sure
    Ratings: +1,225 / 0
    I had recently bought my Sage 389-4LL and was hiking back to the car through some serious brush after a delightful evening fishing. Ready to stow my new rod, I saw that I had only 3 of the 4 sections in hand.

    I retraced my steps most of the way back, peering hard through the gloom, brush and leaves for the missing tip section. Not finding it after returning to the river, I turned back in despair. Less than 20 feet from the car, I found the tip, snapped where I had stepped on it, unseen on my first trip back to look for it.

    My lesson: Do NOT unstring your rod for a bushwhack. It's all too easy for a branch or vine to snag a guide and pull a section loose. A tight line connecting all the sections will help prevent that from happening.

    Fortunately, my only experience with Sage's outstanding warranty service resulted in a new tip section shipped back to my welcoming hands in less than 3 weeks - in August no less!

    "Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment." - Will Rogers

    K
    Brian Miller, Jslo and Kyle Smith like this.
  7. Richard Olmstead BigDog

    Posts: 2,486
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +786 / 0
    Lucky guy, Kent. A broken tip is good for a warranty replacement. A lost tip is a three piece rod without a tip section. I dropped a tip section of my Redington 4-wt in the pouring rain at a treefarm lake last spring and didn't realize it was missing until I got home. I went back the next morning and found it, but I must have stepped on it, even though there wasn't a visual break; it broke on the first cast next time I used it.

    I feel like I have broken more than my share of rods. Now I try to take the few moments required to break my rod down and put it in a sock before walking with it.

    D
    Kent Lufkin likes this.
  8. David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

    Posts: 1,910
    Walla Walla, WA
    Ratings: +740 / 0

    Oh, oh...brushfight!!! For the most part I'll give you it may be worse in general on the wet side.
    Gregg Lundgren likes this.
  9. David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

    Posts: 1,910
    Walla Walla, WA
    Ratings: +740 / 0

    Completely agree. I never unstring anything until it slides back into the tube in the car.
  10. Jslo Active Member

    Posts: 181
    Ratings: +80 / 0
    Maybe I'm just type A or afraid to lose something, but I pretty much break my rod down whenever I'm headed on the move. It just really doesn't take me long to rig it up. Even for a nymph rig type setup it's probably 2-3 minutes tops for me to rig from case to cast. Alot easier to be on the move in the mountains near where I live if the thing is cased, and jammed into my backpack even if it sticks out a little like a small chimney or radio antenna! lol
  11. Gregg Lundgren Now fishing on weekdays too!

    Posts: 513
    N. Edmonds / Mukilteo, WA
    Ratings: +89 / 0
    Jslo, You are a type A with patience.;) Are you on the move to just one destination or a dozen?
    Jslo likes this.
  12. Jslo Active Member

    Posts: 181
    Ratings: +80 / 0
    LOL. Usually if I'm hiking in the mtns I might be hitting 3-5 or more places in a hiking sequence. sometimes its a couple hundred meters between spots, sometimes a couple miles. If it's only a quick short open hike of course I don't break down for that. But anything longer or more treed and I break down.

    In the canyon that I consider my home river, I rarely break down as I'll wade a large section, hike back to the truck on the side of the road after exiting the river- and leaving everything rigged- drive to the next wadeable section...

    I never bushwhack with my rod uncased. Just too much to think about as I bushwhack lol.
    Gregg Lundgren likes this.
  13. David Loy Senior Moment

    Posts: 2,410
    Wolf Bay
    Ratings: +319 / 2
    Patron Pole is a hiking/wading staff that holds a two piece rod (8' max.) inside.
  14. zen leecher aka bill w born to work, forced to fish

    Posts: 3,154
    Moses Lake, WA
    Ratings: +963 / 1
    Breaking a 389 LL makes me whimper. That's a good rod. I could handle a broken SP or RPL but not a 389 LL.
    Kent Lufkin likes this.
  15. Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

    Posts: 7,136
    Not sure
    Ratings: +1,225 / 0
    It was one of the Classic reissued LLs, not a vintage one, which made the pain a bit less sharp. Nonetheless...

    K
  16. Jslo Active Member

    Posts: 181
    Ratings: +80 / 0
    Speaking of which, and slightly off-topic I know – but how can you tell the difference between the reissued "classic" or a vintage LL?
  17. 10incher Active Member

    Posts: 210
    Coupeville, Washington
    Ratings: +92 / 0
    A lot of talk about rods broken due to trail stomping. JM2C but I use my graphite rods for bigger streams, still water, etc. where I'll need extra distance and there are usually decent trails. For small stream bushwhacking I take my fiberglass rods. Much less fragile and I do like the way they fish for small water. I've had many accidents like tripping over blackberry bushes or small tumbles down sheer faces where my fiberglass rod took a hit that would shatter any graphite rod.
  18. Kyle Smith Active Member

    Posts: 1,954
    Bozeman, MT
    Ratings: +267 / 0
    I'm pretty sure the reissue was just the 389-4 and they also did a limited reissue of the 4711-2 LL for Feather Craft. I could be totally wrong, but the original GII and GIII LL's (wow, is this English?) were 2 and 3-piece rods only.
    Kent Lufkin likes this.
  19. Old Man Just an Old Man

    Posts: 21,628
    Dillon, Mt
    Ratings: +1,656 / 0
    I only broke one rod while walking through the woods. I was young and dumb at the time and was walking with my rod out in front like an idiot. I have since walked with my rod facing backwards. Never had a problem doing it that way. And the rod was all together at the time.

    I have since then not walked farther than a few feet to fish. No brush busting anymore. Here, where I fish now, I can drive to. No walking involve unless I'm walking behind my truck to get a different rod out.
    10incher likes this.
  20. Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

    Posts: 7,136
    Not sure
    Ratings: +1,225 / 0
    Sage made just 500 of the reissued ('Classic') 389-4LLs back in the early- to mid-2000s. Each was engraved on the butt cap with that rod's individual number (mine was #50.) The reissued LLs came in a black tube with the word 'Classic' printed on the side in gold lettering while the vintage rods came in a putty-colored tube with the Sage name printed on the side in teal.

    If I remember right, the reissues were originally priced at $500 or so. They weren't terribly successful in terms of sales, and I recall that the last hundred or so were sold to an online fly shop in Pennsylvania who blew them out at $350 or so each (which was a pisser for those of us who paid full retail). I think Porter still has a reissued LL and he might remember the details better than I.

    I ended up selling mine in 2007 to a fellow in southern California. I figured I was pretty lucky to have gotten $395 for it.

    I'm no authority on vintage LLs and have heard varying opinions about configuration of the original LLs. I believe that Kyle's post above is correct - the vintage LLs were made only in 2- and 3-piece configurations. I've seen, lawn-cast, or fished perhaps 4 vintage LLs in the past decade and all were 2-piece. It's worth remembering that back in the mid-90s when the vintage LLs were made, most rods were still 2-piece while 4-piecers were fairly rare.

    K