Want to start tying for saltwater, SRC

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by robeau, May 9, 2010.

  1. robeau New Member

    Posts: 12
    Maple Valley, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Looking for some input on what all is needed to start tying for the saltwater, sea run cutt's mainly. There is a older Orvis rotary vise for sale that I'm looking at 50.00, pics posted below. Wandering if this would get the job done or should I be looking at something else or a kit maybe? Looking at tying tube flies, clousers ,poppers maybe. Thank you for you thoughts
  2. Matthew Gulbranson Resident Swinger

    Posts: 1,732
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +46 / 0
    Hey Robeau,

    I say get it and start tying! If your like me you'll need plenty of practice before things start looking like flies! Use the search function on this site and start looking for salt flies, SRC (sea run cutthroat) flies and such and you'll have plenty to start with. Get tying and go get em!
  3. Nick Clayton Active Member

    Posts: 2,733
    Ratings: +948 / 4
    I'm sure that vise will be just fine. However if you're unsure there are plenty of options out there for not a lot of money. I have had a Danvise for a couple months and can't say enough good about it. 75 bucks brand new. Hell of a deal.

    As for getting started, do a search for Dryflylarry's Popsicle Stick. Very effective and a relatively easy tie to get you going.


    Nick
  4. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,265
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Ratings: +1,224 / 9
    Jump in with two feet, search the saltwater forum and scour the gallery for pattern ideas. Until you have all the "right" materials just tie on impression and instinct. Imitate what you don't have yet and then get those flies wet.
  5. Steve Saville Active Member

    Posts: 2,415
    Tacoma, WA
    Ratings: +287 / 1
    Go to the library and get some books or check out a local shop. If I see a fly I like, I buy one and then try to mimic it. Sometimes I'm successful, sometimes not, and once in a while, the fly I bought mutates into a better version or leads me to an entirely new idea. I stick with baitfish flies, for the most part. They are relatively easy to tie and don't require a lot of materials.
  6. kelvin Active Member

    Posts: 1,943
    Seattle,WA
    Ratings: +231 / 0
    xcome to the event at Steve's place some of us are doing tying demos
  7. Chad Lewis NEVER wonder what to do with your free time

    Posts: 872
    TriCities, WA
    Ratings: +150 / 0
    I like to do what Steve does too; a lot of my tying is copying patterns that I want to fish with. Get yourself a book or two on SRC's (Les Johnson's is highly recommended, and may be the definitive work on the subject). As for the tying itself, take some lessons. That shortens the learning curve so much it's ridiculous. By taking lessons, you also get to tie on a vise and see if you like it and try your hand at tying different flies. The rest, as they say, is practice-practice-practice.

    I've also found that if you poke around enough on the internet you'll find recipes for most all the flies you want to tie, if not videos. Just do google searches. On YouTube, I've found Davie McPhail's videos a fantastic source of learning, not to mention learning to tie some great flies!
  8. Steve Saville Active Member

    Posts: 2,415
    Tacoma, WA
    Ratings: +287 / 1
    By the way, don't buy a kit. Most of what you get is second quality and of no use for most of what you will want to tie. Get a specific pattern in mind and buy just what you need for that fliy or maybe two or three patterns. Then you don't waste money and you have exactly what you need. That's how I built my collection of stuff that has grown out of hand lately. But, I rarely have to go looking for something unless it's really special stuff.
  9. Richard Torres Active Member

    Posts: 1,346
    Mill Creek
    Ratings: +76 / 0
    These guys are right on Robeau.
    In addition, look up previous posts from Les and Roger Stephens. ( Look below in the "Similiar Threads" box)
    These gents have tremendous knowledge of our local waters and what they post is always entertaining to read...
    Good luck and welcome to the forum!

    Richard
  10. robbbos east coast transplant

    Posts: 59
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I think this is all great advice. I just tied my first SRC flies... I went to a fly shop, saw a pattern I liked, bought the materials, and went home and tied 15 (for the fly swap). I haven't fished them yet, but I think they came out nicely... plus I now have materials for some other saltwater flies I want to tie. My fly was essentially a clouser minnow with a popper head rather than metal eyes, which was pretty darn simple... plus I can tie the traditional clouser and fish below the surface as well. Good luck!

    Rob
  11. flyfish_pimp $2 coyote steak

    Posts: 97
    seattle, wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    That vise will do the job, but I would save your money and get a better quality setup. The real question is, do you want to spend a lot of time tying (versus 1-2 times a month/year)? Do you really want to learn to tie tube flies? If yes, you are going to need something else. Tons of options, but for tubes specifically I would ask your local fly shop for recommendations on brands to look at or hit the websites of a few name brand vises to see if they offer a tube conversion kit/jaw.

    The extra money you spend will get you a vise that has a lot more fine adjsutments, a pedestal (unless you really want a C-Clamp), and a WAY better jaw. I started out with a vise similar to the one in your picture and I regret it...total piece of junk, and the jaws were scarred/dented after about a year of tying. On top of that, the hook fell out all the time because the locking mechanism was garbage.

    For SRC flies, I would start out basic - think clouser minnows, even if you are doing tubes. Chartruese/white, pink/white, also do some brown/yellow or brown/olive. Also not a bad idea to tie in a grizzly hackle down each side to mimic the lateral line (like really thin dry fly hackle). 1-1.5 inch patterns, keep them pretty sparse. The baitfish you see will be about this size.
  12. robeau New Member

    Posts: 12
    Maple Valley, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Thanks everyone for your advice. I think I will wait and get a better vise capable of tube flies also. I went to see Roger's presentation at Orvis in Bellevue a couple weeks ago and the tube flies definitely interests me, I even won one of Roger's Sand Lance flies in the raffle! Now if I did not have to buy a new laundry set last weekend... how nice of a vise could I have right now?
  13. colton rogers wishin' i was fishin'

    Posts: 874
    gig harbor, washington
    Ratings: +10 / 0
  14. robeau New Member

    Posts: 12
    Maple Valley, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Colton, thanks Puget Sound Fly Co. {Anil} has
    taken good care of us.
  15. colton rogers wishin' i was fishin'

    Posts: 874
    gig harbor, washington
    Ratings: +10 / 0
    start by finding a few simple patterns to get down the basics and move on from there. marabou closers are the easiest